Boing Boing 

New York nears settlement with local Muslim leaders over spying lawsuit

Muslim-Americans protesting NYPD surveillance. Image: Reuters


Muslim-Americans protesting NYPD surveillance. Image: Reuters

The NYC government has come to initial settlement terms with Muslims, represented by the American Civil Liberties Union, who challenged police surveillance as an unconstitutional and stigmatizing intrusion on their religious rights.

Read the rest

Librarians, hackers and privacy activists gather in San Francisco, June 29/30

The day after this year's American Library Association conference in San Francisco, the Noisebridge Hackerspace will host lawyers, hackers, librarians, and privacy ninjas in a two-day workshop on reinventing libraries' mission in the age of surveillance.Read the rest

Less than a day left to kill Paraguay's mass surveillance bill


Katitza from EFF writes, "Paraguay is at a vitally important digital civil liberties crossroads, and we're calling on all Paraguayans to help! "

Read the rest

Screw the techno-determinists -- give me hope instead


In my latest Guardian Column If one thing gives me hope for the future, it’s the cause of ​internet freedom, I talk about the myth that technology activists are "techno-determinists" -- we fight not because we know we'll win, but because we believe there's a possibility that we might not lose.

Read the rest

URGENT: Senate backtracks on TPP fasttrack -- call Congress to oppose the Trans Pacific Partnership

Just days after the Senate rejected the Obama administration's bid to fast-track the secretive Trans-Pacific Partnership, they've backtracked, and now they're getting ready to rush fast-track through.

Read the rest

Tell the Copyright Office not to criminalize using unapproved goop in a 3D printer

3D printing giant Stratasys has asked the US Copyright Office to deny a proposal that would legalize jailbreaking your 3D printer in order to use your own feedstock.

Read the rest

Following the key Trans-Pacific Partnership senator with a 30' blimp

Evan from Fight for the Future writes, "The folks who wrote SOPA are trying to get extremist copyright provisions into the secretive Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement -- the one that Congress is trying to 'Fast Track' right now."

Read the rest

What should the next Aaron Swartz do when the DOJ knocks?

Aaron Swartz found out the hard way that you can't expect justice from the Department of Justice: what should the next Aaron Swartz do when facing decades in prison for information activism?Read the rest

North Korean defectors undermine totalitarianism with smuggled pirate sitcoms


In an amazing, long, in-depth investigative piece, Wired's Andy Greenberg recounts the story of North Korean dissidents who have escaped, but who mastermind ambitious smuggling efforts that send thousands of USB sticks and SD cards over the border stuffed with pirate media:

Read the rest

World War 3 Illustrated: prescient outrage from the dawn of the Piketty apocalypse

The Reagan era kicked off a project to dismantle social mobility and equitable justice began. This trenchant, angry, gorgeous graphic zine launched in response.Read the rest

Snooper's Charter is dead: let's hammer a stake through its heart and fill its mouth with garlic

We killed the dreadful Snooper's Charter last week, again, for the third or fourth time, depending on how you count -- now how do we keep it from rising from the grave again and terrorizing Britain with the threat of total, ubiquitous, uncontrolled state spying?

Read the rest

Modified London police brag-sheets


These are a refreshing antidote to the Metropolitan London Police's poster campaign trumpeting their 2014 achievements.

Read the rest

Spain's Xnet: leak-publishing corruption-fighters


Xnet is a Spanish collective that invites the public to leak evidence of corruption using the Tor anonymizer, then uses those leaks to bring private criminal complaints against officials and corporations.

Read the rest

Fight for the Future gives the FCC a holiday break, asks you to write Congress about Net Neutrality instead


Evan from Fight for the Future writes, "In the last two months, net neutrality supporters (like you?) have helped us drive more than 55,000 phone calls to desks at the FCC demanding real Title II net neutrality."

That's a lot. Like, 1,000 phone calls per day. Best part: we're going right around the FCC's switchboard and connecting people directly to FCC officials.

FCC employees are people too. So, we're going to give the FCC a little holiday break this week. But if they don't show us on their December 11th meeting that they're headed in the right direction, we'll be back, and in greater numbers.

Want to help the fight right now? Send an email to Congress telling them not to be idiots about net neutrality, it's not a partisan issue.

We're giving the FCC a holiday break!

(Thanks, Evan!)

Global Net Neutrality Coalition


The Electronic Frontier Foundation has teamed up with organizations around the world to fight for net neutrality everywhere, because this isn't an issue that just affects Americans. You can help by finding a group in your country and joining in.

Read the rest

Growing movement against Mafia extortion

palermo

Not long ago, 80 percent of shops in Palermo, Sicily were paying pizzo, or protection money, to the Mafia. But a growing movement is putting a serious dent in the pizzo racket. A group of activists is encouraging business to resist Mafia shakedowns, and it seems to be working. It's called Addiopizzo -- Italian for "Goodbye, protection money."

The turning point came when the owner of a rural pub decided not to pay pizzo and as a result started to lose fearful customers. Addiopizzo started organizing outings to his bar every Saturday night, both to show their support and to keep cash flowing his way. The villagers started returning to the pub, and the mob, faced with mass defiance, decided to leave the place alone.

This evolved into a formal strategy: a reverse boycott of businesses that publicly promised not to pay protection money. Addiopizzo assembled a list of 3,500 people who had agreed to patronize places that rejected pizzo. With that in hand, the group was able to convince several enterprises to take a no-pizzo pledge and to put up an orange sticker advertising their stance. (Addiopizzo then found itself developing an investigatory arm, to make sure the owners were keeping their promises.) With time, the lists of both the anti-pizzo companies and the anti-pizzo customers grew longer. When the mafia retaliated by burning down a warehouse belonging to a business that had taken the pledge, Addiopizzo organized public support for the victims: collecting funds for unemployed workers, holding demonstrations against the assault, and using Italy's anti-mafia compensation laws to secure a new warehouse from the government. By refusing to pay for protection, the company had acquired a different sort of protection.

Image: BJS

Free/CC book on transmedia activism


Sasha Costanza-Chock writes, "My book about transmedia organizing is now available for free, Creative Commons licensed download from the MIT Press!"

Read the rest