Take a look at the bogus athletic resume Lori Loughlin concocted to get her daughter into USC

Prosecutors released one of the make-believe athletic resumes that Lori Loughlin, aka Aunt Becky, manufactured to get her daughters into USC. Although neither daughter ever rowed a boat for any team, both pretended to be on crew teams when applying to college. The resume (below) says that one of her daughters (whose name is blacked out) had won many a medals, two gold, dating back to 2014. And her impressive coxswain skill-set includes "awareness, organization, direction, and steering." Check out Loughlin's (and husband Mossimo Giannulli's) handiwork:

Source: Insider

Top image: pxhere Resume image: District of Massachusetts/DocumentCloud Read the rest

Isaac Asimov: How to never run out of ideas again

Wikipedia says Isaac Asimov wrote 506 published books. Where did he get his ideas? Charles Chu says Asimov used a number of tactics:

1. Never Stop Learning

“All this incredibly miscellaneous reading, the result of lack of guidance, left its indelible mark. My interest was aroused in twenty different directions and all those interests remained. I have written books on mythology, on the Bible, on Shakespeare, on history, on science, and so on.”

2. Don’t Fight the Stuck

"I don’t stare at blank sheets of paper. I don’t spend days and nights cudgeling a head that is empty of ideas. Instead, I simply leave the novel and go on to any of the dozen other projects that are on tap. I write an editorial, or an essay, or a short story, or work on one of my nonfiction books. By the time I’ve grown tired of these things, my mind has been able to do its proper work and fill up again. I return to my novel and find myself able to write easily once more."

3. Beware the Resistance

4. Lower Your Standards

5. Make MORE Stuff

6. “By thinking and thinking and thinking till I’m ready to kill myself."

Image: Wikipedia Read the rest

The truth about writer's block

Studies have found writer's block to be a simpler problem—unhappiness—than the legends around it suggest. But there are different kinds of unhappiness, and it's the blockee's job to be honest about which one they're suffering from.

The first, more anxious group felt unmotivated because of excessive self-criticism—nothing they produced was good enough—even though their imaginative capacity remained relatively unimpaired. (That’s not to say that their imaginations were unaffected: although they could still generate images, they tended to ruminate, replaying scenes over and over, unable to move on to something new.) The second, more socially hostile group was unmotivated because they didn’t want their work compared to the work of others. (Not everyone was afraid of criticism; some writers said that they didn’t want to be “object[s] of envy.”) Although their daydreaming capacity was largely intact, they tended to use it to imagine future interactions with others. The third, apathetic group seemed the most creatively blocked. They couldn’t daydream; they lacked originality; and they felt that the “rules” they were subjected to were too constrictive. Their motivation was also all but nonexistent. Finally, the fourth, angry and disappointed group tended to look for external motivation; they were driven by the need for attention and extrinsic reward. They were, Barrios and Singer found, more narcissistic—and that narcissism shaped their work as writers. They didn’t want to share their mental imagery, preferring that it stay private.

I bet group 1 (self-critics) account for most, though. Turn off your inner editor—and if necessary, move to a medium (longhand, typewriter) that deprives you of editorial tools Read the rest