Trump ad uses Nazi symbol to woo voters

The New York Times reports that Facebook took down Trump campaign advertisements that "prominently featured a symbol used by Nazis to classify political prisoners during World War II."

The symbol was a red triangle, which ran alongside ad copy that said, “Dangerous MOBS of far-left groups are running through our streets and causing absolute mayhem.”

According to the Times, the red triangle is "a symbol that Nazis used to identify Communists and other political prisoners in concentration camps, just as they used a pink triangle to identify people they labeled as homosexual."

From The New York Times:

The Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum also weighed in on Twitter, noting that the red triangle was “the most common category of prisoners registered at the German Nazi #Auschwitz camp.”

Mark Bray, a historian at Rutgers and the author of “Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook,” said that “the origin of the symbol is universally agreed to be with the Nazis and the concentration camps.” He added that the red triangle was not part of the symbolism of antifa in the United States.

The fact that the triangle has been reclaimed by some anti-fascists, Mr. Bray said, does not give the Trump campaign license to use the same symbol to attack antifa. “This is a symbol that represented the extermination of leftists,” he said. “It is a death threat against leftists. There’s no way around what that means historically.”

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Police decline to arrest the leader of a Neo-Nazi terrorist network because he's 13 years old

The Feuerkrieg Division is the Baltic version of the US-based Atomwaffen Nazi paramilitary. And like their American counterparts, they were planning some murder, specifically with bombs.

Fortunately, authorities were able to put a stop to theses plans once they identified and found their leader — who turned out to be a 13-year-old boy. From Deutsche Welles:

Investigators found the group was headed by a 13-year-old, the German magazinesaid, citing Estonian newspaper Eesti Ekspress. The young man operated online under the name "Commander" and was responsible for the recruitment and admission of new members.

He also shared bomb-making instructions, spoke about planning an attack on London and suggested organizing military training camps in February, to commemorate the "100th birthday" of Adolf Hitler's former political party NSDAP.

A spokesman for the Estonian Internal Security Service told The Associated Press that they had intervened with the 13-year-old Commander's parents in Finland in January, but that, "As the case dealt with a child under the age of 14, this person cannot be prosecuted under the criminal law and instead other legal methods must be used to eliminate the risk. Cooperation between several authorities, and especially parents, is important to steer a child away from violent extremism."

The Feuerkrieg Division has operatives in Germany, Lithuania, and the US, and some of their other leaders have also been apprehended recently. But the group was largely organized online, and according to the Eesti Ekspress, which broke the story, no one seemed to be aware that they were taking orders from a maniacal 13-year-old. Read the rest

Neo-nazi assholes seek to chase Jews from Whitefish, Montana

Ironically named Whitefish, Montana seems to be a hotbed of American anti-Semitism. Blessed with a number of Jewish residents, as well as the mother of Richard Spencer, leader of the white supremacist National Policy Institute, this small town is suffering from Trumpism's open season on non-whites.

In response to an email from a local realtor, who happens to be jewish, asking Spencer's mother if she'd like to sell, bigots will march in Whitefish showing off their guns.

The ADL has this to say:

Andrew Anglin, the neo-Nazi who runs The Daily Stormer, a blatantly racist and anti-Semitic website, has ratcheted up his campaign of harassment against the Jewish community in and around Whitefish, Montana, including announcing an armed march in the town by white supremacists that he has scheduled for January.

Whitefish is the part-time home of Richard Spencer, a prominent spokesperson within the white supremacist alt right, and his parents. Spencer’s mother claimed in a recent article that she was being harassed to sell her property in the town because of her son’s views. As evidence, she made public emails between herself and a realtor, who happens to be Jewish, though Spencer’s mother did not point this out.

On December 16, Anglin reacted to the article by encouraging his “troll army” of neo-Nazis and other white supremacists to contact Jews in the small town and oppose their “Jew agenda.” Moreover, Anglin posted photos to his website of a number of Jewish residents of Whitefish, including a child, and superimposed a yellow Jewish star with the word “Jude” on the pictures.

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