Forbidden Wine: Tide detergent now comes in a dispenser box

Tanya Chen and Katie Notopoulos asked Tide about the "delicious laundry wine" that teens won't be drinking.

When asked if P&G was aware of the dark futility of the internet, and if they had any concerns, the spokesperson provided BuzzFeed News with the following statement:

"We all know laundry detergent is for cleaning clothes. To be sure people know this is detergent, we put a large picture of our Tide bottle on the side of the box. Whether your Tide comes in a box or a bottle, it should be stored up and away, out of the reach of children."

It's funny, and I will be buying one and reviewing the '18 vintage, but after the whole "eating Tide pods" imbroglio it's hard to avoid the suspicion that this can't be an accident. There's an entire marketing discplipline devoted to avoiding semiotic shelf disasters -- avoiding the packaging formats, colors and type design associated with edible goods -- and this blithely handwaves through a third of it. Read the rest

Bill Gates attempts to guess the prices of everyday grocery items

Microsoft founder Bill Gates admittedly hasn't been in a supermarket in a long time, so when Ellen put him up to estimating the prices of some pretty typical grocery store items, he was hilariously lost. Particularly watch the look of pity Ellen gives at the 1:12 mark when the billionaire guesses that a container of Tide Pods is only four dollars.

With a lot of help from the audience, Bill was able to get the price right (within a dollar) of three items. Because of his "win," that audience will return for Ellen's popular "12 Days of Giveaways" segment.

(reddit) Read the rest

A gritty Netflix-style documentary on the Tide Pods epidemic

The folks at Reality Check Documentaries took the trailer for Netflix's gritty drug-crime docuseries DOPE and made it into a clever parody for the "Tide Pods epidemic." It works a little too well, imo.

The official trailer for #TideDoc a documentary exploring the struggles and lives of pushers and the police in their never ending cat and mouse game.

Previously: Now there's Tide Pods sushi and, yes, it's edible Read the rest

Now there's Tide Pods sushi and, yes, it's edible

Tide's laundry detergent pods look good enough to eat. In fact, since the brightly-colored product's introduction (a bestseller for its creator, Proctor & Gamble) six years ago, children have frequently gotten sent to the ER for consuming them.

Despite the dangers, the "eating Tide Pods meme" remains strong.

In March 2017, this CollegeHumor "Don't eat the laundry pods" video emerged:

Now, in 2018, we finally have "Tide Pods" you can actually eat, in the form of vegan sushi. While recipes for Tide Pods candy and a gelatin-based dessert have been floating around, Hilary, a friend of Redditor dweron, has attempted to crack the "edible pods code." Her sushi retains the squishiness of the swirling "purple" and "orange" sections using truly edible foods like carrot, cabbage, and rice paper.

I say "attempted" because, in my opinion, Tide Pods would taste like candy or frosting not vegan sushi. Solid try, though!

(Mashable) Read the rest