Cotton and jelly sandwich?

The U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service approved the growing of a new kind of cotton plant that's been genetically modified to be edible. The toxic chemical gossypol in the plant usually makes the cotton dangerous for humans to eat. Texas A&M biotechnologist Keerti Rathore and colleagues genetically stopped the production of gossypol in the cottonseed while not interfering with it elsewhere in the plant where it acts as a natural insecticide. From Reuters:

“To me, personally, it tastes somewhat like chickpea and it could easily be used to make a tasty hummus,” Rathore said of gossypol-free cottonseed.

After cottonseed oil, which can be used for cooking, is extracted, the remaining high-protein meal from the new cotton plant can find many uses, Rathore said.

It can be turned into flour for use in breads, tortillas and other baked goods and used in protein bars, while whole cottonseed kernels, roasted and salted, can be consumed as a snack or to create a peanut butter type of paste, Rathore added.

(via Daily Grail) Read the rest

Halloween-themed hamburger promises to give you nightmares

A top burger chain promises that its new burger will "give you nightmares". It's putting out a 2-minute ad showing actors submitting to a sleep study after devouring a seasonally-themed sandwich, then reporting the night-time horrors that resulted.

Here's the ad:

"The burger in my dream transformed into the figure of a snake," one reports.

Fox 8 News:

A new ad shows participants hooked up to sleep monitoring machines after eating the burger. Per USA Today, the incidence of nightmares increased 3.5 times over the normal rate, apparently due to various proteins. “I remember hearing voices and people walking around talking,” one participant says, per People.

Quite a risky campaign in the country where significant numbers of people think vaccines cause autism, that chemtrails are sterilizing us, that Jews have tails, etc. Read the rest

Freddie Mercury chocolate cake

IT'S PERFECT. Read the rest

How to cook and eat a gourmet meal in Antarctica

Very quickly. Before it, and you, freeze.

On Cyprien Verseux's Twitter account, wonderful snapshots of fun with food on the bleak, frozen ice sheets of Antarctica. Read the rest

How curly fries are cut

Such a soothing video. Read the rest

Hear these breakfast sausages cry for mercy as they are cooked

The horror... the horror.

(via r/videos) Read the rest

The Yogi Bear Graveyard

The Yogi Bear Graveyard was a short-lived accidental tourist attraction in North Carolina. After Yogi Bear's Honey-Fried Chicken restaurant chain dwindled to just one location, the owners sold all the fiberglass statues of Yogi, Boo-Boo, Cindy, and Ranger Smith to a local Jellystone Park campground. After that failed, the statues were dumped behind a truckstop.

Travelers who find themselves in Hartsville South Carolina can still visit that last location standing. The beginning of the end for the chain came when Hardee's bought the honey-flavored chicken additive they used in their chicken. Via The Post and Courier:

From its first location in Myrtle Beach, Yogi Bear expanded to Charlotte, Rocky Mount and Hartsville, among other cities. The franchise was about six stores strong when Hardee’s expressed interest in the honey technology; the Rocky Mount-based chain purchased the method for $1 million, according to Davis.

But once Yogi Bear belonged to Hardee’s, the branded stores were largely neglected.

“It was mismanagement,” says Yogi Bear’s current owner, George Atkins. “All the rest of them just didn’t control their costs.”

Anyone who finds themselves in Hartsville can still stop by Yogi Bear's and enjoy some batter fried corn, liver, or even the original honey-fried chicken.

The Yogi Bear Graveyard Read the rest

Burger restaurant owners take Gordon Ramsay's criticism poorly

"I can see the blood, but what's in it?" asks the cantankerous celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay about a burger before taking a bite, in an episode of Kitchen Nightmares.

After he tastes it, Ramsay says, "that is hideous" and moves the plate away.

The restaurant owners get mad at Ramsay, and even madder at their executive chef, after he serves a differently prepared burger to Ramsay which the show host declares "delicious." Read the rest

How to make prison pizza

Former prison inmate Josh of Lockdown 23and1 teaches the proper way to make prison pizza using only ingredients that an inmate might easily be able to acquire: saltines, Ritz crackers, ramen, tomato sauce, cheese, pepperoni, Slim Jims, and pickles.

(via Laughing Squid)

Read the rest

Today in sadness: cut out carbs and red meat'll still kill you

I've been on a keto diet for the past month and change. I love it! I can eat all the meat, dairy and nuts I want to! I snack on beef jerky, cured meats and nuts when I'm hungry. I can still enjoy a lot of the vegetables I love! I can--oh shit.

From Popular Science:

In a recent study in The Lancet as well as in prior work, including this 2010 analysis, researchers have found that people who eat few carbs and rely on plant matter for their fat and protein intake—think beans and nuts—tend to be healthy, long-living specimens, relatively speaking. Those who eat few carbs and rely on animal proteins and fats, especially red meat, are the only low-carb dieters who seem to suffer for it. They tend to be less healthy in terms of cancer and cardiovascular disease, which are often the primary outcomes measured in these kinds of studies, and as a result they live shorter lives. This makes sense—plant protein is better for you than many animal proteins because plants contain less saturated fat, which can drive heart disease, and often have more fiber and nutrients.

I suppose I should be investing in a little more of all those tasty things other than red meat. And maybe cut down on the chicken. Also, fish.

That said, as Popular Science is quick to point out, "these studies, like virtually all nutrition studies, are merely finding associations between groups of people who are often self-reporting data. Read the rest

RIP, Kenny Shopsin, New York City's greatest restaurateur

Kenny Shopsin was the proprietor of Shopsin's, an incredible, storied, secretive, boisterous, tiny restaurant and general store in Greenwich Village, whose cookbook/memoir is a masterclass in sloppy diner chef-craft in the mode of Daniel Pinkwater's Fat Guys From Outer Space. He died this week. Read the rest

In-N-Out donates $25,000 to California Republican Party, under Trump. There's a boycott.

In-N-Out, the popular California burger chain, just dropped $25,000 on the California GOP under Donald Trump. Read the rest

Meat vending machines in New York

Applestone Meat Co. has installed meat vending machines at their Stone Ridge, NY shop with plans to deploy 24-hour meat machines in Hudson, Scarsdale, and Manhattan. From Bloomberg:

Each is filled with a different type of protein: beef, pork, lamb, and ground meat and sausage. He has to restock the machines constantly to keep up with demand. Later this year, Applestone is expanding to Hudson, where the store will have at least seven machines. By early next year the company will open in Scarsdale, where he’s planning for 10 machines, and later in 2019 he’ll open in Manhattan, with possibly even more.

Accessibility is key to this unlikely success; customers don’t have to get to the butcher shop by 7 p.m. or buy questionable leftover product from a late-night market. “We’re not in the 1950s anymore, where everyone works 9 to 5 and eats at the same time every night,” Applestone says of 24/7 accessibility to meat. “Life is chaotic. At best.”

"Your Next Steak Could Come From a Vending Machine" (via Uncrate)

Read the rest

Super, super, super-size me: a 2142 calorie meal

Have you ever woken up one morning and bemoaned how much time you waste everyday preparing and eating meals? You have to rifle through your refrigerator to dig up ingredients, prepare them in some mildly pleasing and palatable way, before finally consuming them. Even if you’re the type of person who prefers eating out, there’s the choosing a restaurant, deciding what to order, paying, and, again, actually sitting down to eat the meal. This isn’t even addressing the time spent trying not to think about what insidious strain of salmonella or E. coli might be lurking under that leaf of Romaine lettuce. Time. Money. Dangerous vegetables.

Well, in Japan the company Peyoung might have an answer to your prayers. Especially if your prayers included: How do I get an entire day's worth of calories into one sitting?

A little while ago I was stopped dead in my tracks at my local 7-11 when I saw this package (above). Let me read that for you. It says Cho-Cho-Cho Omori Gigamax Yakisoba (Super, Super, Super Large Serving Gigamax Cup Fried Noodles). You'll notice the 2,142 calories is written nice and boldly, too. Below that is a friendly request to limit your consumption of this yummy and enormous meal to only once a day, because you could possibly exceed your daily calorie intake, and that would be bad.

But isn't that the dream? One delicious meal, prepared in a mere three minutes, and all those pesky calories garnered in one fell swoop? Read the rest

Vintage photos of L.A. restaurants that were shaped like the food they served

With L.A.'s iconic Eddie Blake's Tail o' the Pup hot dog stand set to reopen, LAist posted a brief photographic history of the city's fantastic history of "'programmatic architecture,' buildings designed to look like food, animals or other items."

"LA's Awesome History Of Weird, Food-Shaped Restaurants" (via NextDraft)

images: Los Angeles Public Library Collection Read the rest

How rainbow sprinkles are made

From Food Insider:

Rainbow cake sprinkles have been around since the late 18th century, when French candy chefs used them as decorations. Today, liquid food coloring, shortening, and sugar are mixed in hot water to form the sprinkle's colorful dough. Long strands of the dough are broken into the tiny shapes we see on cakes, doughnuts, cookies, and ice cream.

(via Laughing Squid)

Read the rest

We're going to be eating bugs really soon now, again

Whether or not you've ever chosen to eat insects, you've eaten insects, or parts of them, in the grains, legumes, fruits and nuts you've consumed (not to mention the occasional inhaled kamikaze mosquito). Read the rest

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