Porcelain figurines transformed into creepy-cute insects


Judith (AKA Miss Mantis) remakes kitschy-sweet porcelain figurines, transforming them with polymer clay, flocking and paint into statuettes of anthropomorphic insects going about their weird, daily business:. Some favorites: Bee Lady "Mìfēng", Fancy Dancing Mantis Gentleman, Bee Lady "Alice", Little Praying Mantis Boy, and Scandalous Mantis Dancer. Read the rest

Is this a photo of the elusive jackalope?


The jackalope, the mysterious cryptozoological combination of a jackrabbit with the horns of an antelope, has apparently been photographed at Ontario's Bruce Peninsula National Park.

According to Gillian Sutherland-Jones, a resource management technician at the park, the creature was first spotted in spring by a camper. Sutherland-Jones suggests that the animal may actually be a hare with "a birth defect."

Sure it is...

(Mysterious Universe)

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Is this a photo of the elusive and creepy Jersey Devil?


Dave Black snapped this astounding photo of the infamous cryptid known as the Jersey Devil in Galloway Township, New Jersey. Photo evidence is always welcome, as residents of Southern New Jersey and the region have been reporting sightings of this bizarre creature since 1909. Apparently it looks like a kangaroo with a goat's head, bat wings, cloven hooves, and the forked tail of, you guessed it, a devil. Below, a drawing of the infernal beast from a 1909 edition of the Philadelphia Bulletin.

"I was just driving past the golf course in Galloway on Route 9 and had to shake my head a few times when I thought I saw a llama," Black recounted in an email to NJ.com. "If that wasn't enough, then it spread out leathery wings and flew off over the golf course."

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Is this a real pterodactyl flying over Idaho?


“This video made me laugh out loud,” said paleontologist Leif Tapanila, director of the Idaho Museum of Natural History. Read the rest

Loch Ness Monster was almost named after Queen Elizabeth


Famed British conservationist Sir Peter Scott, who gave the Loch Ness Monster the scientific name of Nessiteras rhombopteryx as part of an effort to protect it as an endangered species in case it's real, originally tried in 1960 to get Queen Elizabeth to approve the name Elizabethia Nessiae. Read the rest

Listen to country songs about Bigfoot (c.1970)


Yesterday, I went to a terrific parking lot record swap in San Rafael, California and I regret not purchasing "Bigfoot: (Northwest's Abominable Snowman)," an album of country tunes about my favorite cryptid sung by Don Jones. Check out these two songs from the LP, including the title track that includes the "real scream of the true Bigfoot (Sasquatch.)" Read the rest

The Resurrectionist: Your favorite mythic creatures laid out on a mortician's table


Imagine all your favourite mythic creatures: pegasus, mermaid, centaur, sphinx, minotaur. Now imagine them laid out on a mortician’s table: dissected, given Latin medical labels, and analyzed in terms of their unique muscular and skeletal makeup. This is what we’re offered in the second part of E. B. Hudspeth’s The Resurrectionist in the section titled The Codex Extinct Animalia.

This intriguing novel does its best to defy categorization. Part One reads like a nonfiction textbook piecing together the biography of controversial 19th-century surgeon Dr. Spenser Black. Through reproduced letters, newspaper clippings and exhibition flyers we chart Black’s life: his early career as a stellar young surgeon, his marriage and the birth of his son; and then his rapid descent into infamy, gaining a reputation as a splicer of anatomies and an eccentric who believed that the creatures from our myths are in fact our evolutionary ancestors. Part Two presents his extensive drawings and writings, though it is left up to the reader to decide whether Black was a visionary or a madman.

The book’s beautifully macabre images capture the imagination instantly, but where Hudspeth really impresses is in the utter believability of Dr. Black’s story. The narrative is furnished with a fictional note from the publishers, and Black’s biography neatly intertwines with real 19th-century events. The Resurrectionist channels the aesthetics of Edgar Allan Poe while playing with form in the manner of Jorge Luis Borges. While the novel’s publisher Quirk Books has given us a wealth of visual treats in the last few years, The Resurrectionist still feels like the most immersive and fully realized book in their catalogue. Read the rest

World's most dedicated hunter of Loch Ness monster says he's not about to give up

His current best guess is that "Nessie" is just a large catfish.

Beautiful grotesqueries for your wunderkammer

Seattle's Anthony Hicks has an Etsy store filled with beautiful grotesqueries, including carny sideshow gaffs (come for the feejee mermaid, stay for the mummified head!), but also tooth-filled pocketwatches and artfully preserved homunculi. Read the rest

Badass blankets: Shining, sasquatch, Cthulhu, ancient aliens

Some beautiful new housewares from the people who brought you the Krampus Christmas sweaters. Read the rest

The Loch Ness ladle

It's $21.80 and will make your tureen into a cryptozoological mystery. (via Kottke) Read the rest

Is Blinky the bigfoot really Todd Standing?

Comparison of still from footage of purported bigfoot to photo of Todd Standing.

The world of Bigfoot is no stranger to shysters and hoaxers. In fact, the entire phenomenon could be nothing more than a mix of chicanery, misidentification and gullibility. Yet the subject is enormously popular, with internet forums, YouTube channels, numerous television programs, and even conservation groups focusing on the possibility of the existence of an undescribed, bipedal, North American ape (or demon, alien, or interdimensional being, depending on your point of view). Enter Todd Standing, a self-avowed bigfoot researcher. Standing has purportedly had multiple encounters with these creatures and has even published photos and videos of them. Standing's footage aired during an episode of Les Stroud's Survivorman series, and shows a bigfoot peering through the vegetation. The creature even blinks its eyes in the footage (and has become known as "Blinky" as a result). Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence, and in the eyes of many, Standing's is not only insufficient but downright (and laughably) fake. Phil Poling, photography expert and former law enforcement official, and Daniel Falconer, a special effects expert, have written a paper refuting Standing's evidence. In it they analyze Standing's photos and video footage, and make some pretty compelling points and discoveries using stills from the video and photos of Standing himself. It's a fascinating read if you're interested in the subject. If you're a believer, it's a good guide to critically thinking about the subject and how to NOT go about trying to convince others that bigfoot is real. Read the rest

The Best Bigfoot Podcast

The Bigfoot Show is the best bigfoot podcast you're not listening to.

Weird gremlin photographed in China

What is this mysterious beast photographed by a tourist in the Huairou District valleys in northern Beiking, China? Read the rest

"Bigfoot of Endor" t-shirt

My wife says she always thought of Chewbacca as a space sasquatch; I just spotted this delightful "Bigfoot of Endor" t-shirt on Neatorama!

The forest moon was full of furry creatures of all shapes and sizes, and they generally got along just fine thanks to daily parties and plenty of libations, but when the critter they referred to as Bigfoot moved in things got pretty scary. He carried a big bowcaster and a bag full of tiny bones, and when he spoke it sounded like a sheep was being strangled. The little alien bear people now live in fear of the Bigfoot, hoping to one day hire a smuggler to come and take him away...
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Hunt for living dinosaurs


Are there living dinosaurs in Cameroon or the Republic of Congo? This group thinks so, and they are headed back later this year to keep looking for the Mokèlé-mbèmbé, the legendary "one who stops the flow of rivers." Watch the video to learn about their quest. (via Daily Grail) Read the rest

Loch Ness Monster photo on Apple Maps?

Does this image of Loch Ness from Apple's Maps app depicts Nessie or the wake of a small boat? Unfortunately, I think it's the latter as we all know the Loch Ness Monster more closely resembles a pleiosaur than a giant catfish. (Forbes) Read the rest

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