Weird gremlin photographed in China

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What is this mysterious beast photographed by a tourist in the Huairou District valleys in northern Beiking, China?

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"Bigfoot of Endor" t-shirt

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My wife says she always thought of Chewbacca as a space sasquatch; I just spotted this delightful "Bigfoot of Endor" t-shirt on Neatorama!

The forest moon was full of furry creatures of all shapes and sizes, and they generally got along just fine thanks to daily parties and plenty of libations, but when the critter they referred to as Bigfoot moved in things got pretty scary. He carried a big bowcaster and a bag full of tiny bones, and when he spoke it sounded like a sheep was being strangled. The little alien bear people now live in fear of the Bigfoot, hoping to one day hire a smuggler to come and take him away...

Hunt for living dinosaurs

Are there living dinosaurs in Cameroon or the Republic of Congo? This group thinks so, and they are headed back later this year to keep looking for the Mokèlé-mbèmbé, the legendary "one who stops the flow of rivers." Watch the video to learn about their quest. (via Daily Grail)

Loch Ness Monster photo on Apple Maps?

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Does this image of Loch Ness from Apple's Maps app depicts Nessie or the wake of a small boat? Unfortunately, I think it's the latter as we all know the Loch Ness Monster more closely resembles a pleiosaur than a giant catfish. (Forbes)

1970 cryptozoology paperback cover painting found at yard sale

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Untitled Above is the original glorious painting, artist unknown, used for the cover of the pseudonymous Warren Smith's 1970 book Strange Abominable Snowmen. Having been lost for decades, it recently turned up at a yard sale. I only wish I was the lucky duck who found it. Loren Coleman has the news along with a gallery of other fantastic cover art from vintage cryptozoology paperbacks of that era.

This time it's real, says Bigfoot hoaxer

O RICKDYERBIGFOOT 570 Rick Dyer claims to have killed a Bigfoot after luring it with some pork ribs he purchased at WalMart. "Every test that you can possibly imagine was performed on this body -- from DNA tests to 3D optical scans to body scans," Dyer says. "It is the real deal. It's Bigfoot and Bigfoot's here, and I shot it and now I'm proving it to the world." If Dyer's name sounds familiar, it's because of his impeccable reputation in the Bigfoot research community! He's one of the perps behind the 2008 Bigfoot hoax involving a rubber suit with freezer burn. Besides, everyone knows that Bigfoot is kosher. (KSAT)

Is the yeti related to an ancient polar bear?

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Is the yeti actually some hybrid of ancient polar bear and brown bear? University of Oxford geneticist Bryan Sykes has analyzed DNA from what's purported to be yeti hair samples.

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Snorkeler Drags "Sea Serpent" Carcass to Shore

Photo: Catalina Island Marine Institute

Jasmine Santana, a science instructor with the Catalina Island Marine Institute, was snorkling off the California coast when she made a very strange discovery: the carcass of an 18-foot long oarfish.

These are very odd fish.

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The Michigan Dogman

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The Grand Haven Tribune's Kevin Collier reports on the Dogman, a cryptid that apparently rears its ugly head from time to time in West Michigan. "Legendary Dogman seen in Ottawa County?"

Big Data meets Bigfoot

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Big Data meets Bigfoot in Penn State PhD candidate Joshua Stevens's visualization of nearly a century of Sasquatch sighting reports in the US and Canada. Stevens mapped and graphed more than 3,000 sightings included in the Bigfoot Field Researchers Organizations's database of geocoded and timestamped reports. Stevens writes:

Right away you can see that sightings are not evenly distributed. At first glance, it looks a lot like a map of population distribution. After all, you would expect sightings to be the most frequent in areas where there are a lot of people. But a bivariate view of the data shows a very different story. There are distinct regions where sightings are incredibly common, despite a very sparse population. On the other hand, in some of the most densely populated areas sasquatch sightings are exceedingly rare.
"‘Squatch Watch: 92 Years of Bigfoot Sightings in the US and Canada" (Thanks, everyone!)

LEGO introduces female scientist minifig! (And Yeti too!)

Legoooo LEGO's new Minifgure Series 11 includes its first female (lab) scientist character and a Yeti. Both are excellent additions to the minifig universe! I also appreciate that the scientist is holding Erlenmeyer flasks while the Yeti is gripping a popsicle.

UPDATE: Maia Weinstock writes that she "she's not the first (LEGO) female scientist... she's the first female LAB scientist." More background in Maia's SciAm piecec, "Breaking Brick Stereotypes: LEGO Unveils a Female Scientist"

Bigfoot by K-tel

The reason you really know this was a seventies TV commercial? Children playing outside.

Jersey Devil or… something else?

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Is this the elusive Jersey Devil as some Redditors have speculated? Perhaps it's the dreaded Chupacabras? Or a bastard cousin of the Montauk Monster? The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation claims it's just a furless squirrel. But then, that's what they'd want us to think. "Mystery Solved" (NJ.com)

Monsters and Legends: kids' monster book now in the USA!


Back in April, I reviewed Monsters and Legends, a wonderful illustrated kids' reference book from London's Flying Eye Books. At the time, it was only available in the UK, but now Americans can get it too! Here's my original review:

Monsters and Legends is part of the fabulous debut lineup of titles from Flying Eye, a kids' imprint spun out of London's NoBrow (they're the publishers of recently reviewed books like Welcome to Your Awesome Robot and Akissi). The book, written by Davide Cali and illustrated by Garbiella Giandelli, is a fascinating reference work for kids 7 and up about the curious origins of the monsters of the popular imagination. The book recounts the odd history of stories of mermaids, chupacabras, cyclopses, dragons, the Loch Ness Monster, and other cryptozoology favorites. It's a great balance between fascination with monsters and lore and a skeptical inquiry into how widespread beliefs can be overturned by evidence and rational inquire -- a real "magic of reality" book.


The illustrations in this book represent a range of engaging styles, and they bring it to life for even younger readers. My five year old and I spent several bedtimes on this, flipping through the pages, and stopping when a picture caught her eye. I had to interpret the text for her -- the language was often over her head -- but the stories absolutely grabbed her and it's become a family favorite.

As a one-time monster kid who's doing his best to raise another one, this one gets my unreserved stamp of approval.

MONSTERS AND LEGENDS [Flying Eye]

Monsters and Legends [Amazon]

Incredible pipe cleaner thylacine and other animals

Artist Lauren Ryan creates incredible animal sculptures entirely from pipe cleaners. My favorite is her palm-sized thylacine, a Tasmanian "tiger." The last confirmed thylacine died in 1936 but some crytpozoologists think they may not be extinct after all. Lauren Ryan's "Chenille Stems" (via The Anomalist)