The new Lumberjanes book is sweet and badass, with a hell of a monster

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Books one and two of Lumberjanes introduced us to the characters and setting of the awesome, women-run, girl-positive comics: the girls of Roanoke cabin at Miss Quinzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet's Camp for Hardcore Lady Types are Lumberjanes, being trained in the badass arts. Book three -- collecting comics from a kind of victory lap of the title after its amazing success -- turned the series' reins over to some of the best writers and illustrators in comics-dom for a series of vignettes. Now, with Out of Time, the fourth book, the original creative team are back at the helm, telling a long-form story that illuminates the Lumberjane backstory and introduces one of the best, scariest monsters of cryptozoologica.

Search for the Loch Ness Monster on a luxury super-catamaran

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Cruise Loch Ness has just commissioned construction of a £1.4 million custom catamaran that can take more than 200 passengers on a quest for Nessie. According to the company, purchase of the new vessel was driven by a big, er, swell in Chinese tourists at Loch Ness. From The Scotsman:

The specially-designed catamaran boasts superior features such as monster-sized windows on the main deck, to optimise ‘Nessie’ spotting opportunities. Meanwhile the upper deck will be open at the sides, but covered above, meaning passengers won’t be forced to come inside in bad weather. Toilets and a bar will feature on the main deck.

The vessel will be powered by a pair of Volvo D9 MH main engines. Producing 313kW per side, these powerful engines are capable of propelling the vessel to speeds over 20 knots, whilst being extremely fuel-efficient at the same time.

Oh, I'm sure that if Nessie does exist, it would certainly choose to frolick around this hulking beast speeding through the water.

Above: the infamous hoaxed "Surgeon's Photograph" Read the rest

Skier records Yeti on video

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What rough beast slouches toward Aragon?

Shaky footage of what looks like a strange ape-like creature with white fur clambering though the snow was posted online this week.

Spanish ski resort bosses have been forced to comb part of the Pyrenees after the images sent the internet into a frenzy. But skeptical viewers of the footage say it is just a man dressed in a furry suit.

A skier sounded the alert after posting the photo taken at Formigal in northeastern Spain on a popular website with the message: “Strange animal spotted in Formigal. What the hell is this?.”The picture, retweeted thousands of times, sparked a search by ski resort owners Aramon and a frenzied debate over whether a Spanish Yeti was on the loose or if it was a bear, Photoshop montage or even a soldier wearing mountain camouflage.

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: "Are we ready for 'Bigfoot" or the Loch Ness Monster?"

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In 1977, the US Department of Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service published a fascinating document asking what the government would do if Bigfoot or something like the Loch Ness Monster were to be found? The paper goes on to explain the laws and regulations in place to deal with such a discovery, and also mentions 20th century discoveries like the Komodo dragon and cryptozoology's darling, the coelacanth. From the document:

Finding a Loch Ness monster or Bigfoot is still a possibility, and the discovery would be one of the most important in modern history. As items of scientific and public interest they would surely command more attention than the moon rocks. Millions of curiosity seekers”and thou- sands of zoologists and anthropologists throughout the world would be eager to “get at” the creatures to examine, protect, capture, or just look at them....

Under U.S. Law, the Secretary of the Interior is empowered to list as threatened or endangered a species for 120 days on an emergency basis. For endangered species in the United States, the Secretary can also desig- nate habitat that is critical to their survival. No Federal agency could then authorize, fund, or carry out any activities which would adversely modify that habitat.

So long-term Federal protection of Nessie or Bigfoot would basically be a matter of following the same regulatory mechanisms already used in protecting whooping cranes and tigers.

“Under normal situations,” said Keith Schreiner, then Associate Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “we must know a great deal about a species before we list it.

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Scientist 3D prints hypothetical bigfoot skeleton

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Idaho State University anthropology/anatomy professor Jeffrey Meldrum 3D printed a scale model of a speculative bigfoot skeleton.

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Steiff Japan's centaur teddybears

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The Teddytaur is an actual, $400 product, made from alpaca-wool, sold by high-end toymaker Steiff in its Japanese store. (Thanks, Fipi Lele!) Read the rest

Porcelain figurines transformed into creepy-cute insects

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Judith (AKA Miss Mantis) remakes kitschy-sweet porcelain figurines, transforming them with polymer clay, flocking and paint into statuettes of anthropomorphic insects going about their weird, daily business:. Some favorites: Bee Lady "Mìfēng", Fancy Dancing Mantis Gentleman, Bee Lady "Alice", Little Praying Mantis Boy, and Scandalous Mantis Dancer. Read the rest

Is this a photo of the elusive jackalope?

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The jackalope, the mysterious cryptozoological combination of a jackrabbit with the horns of an antelope, has apparently been photographed at Ontario's Bruce Peninsula National Park.

According to Gillian Sutherland-Jones, a resource management technician at the park, the creature was first spotted in spring by a camper. Sutherland-Jones suggests that the animal may actually be a hare with "a birth defect."

Sure it is...

(Mysterious Universe)

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Is this a photo of the elusive and creepy Jersey Devil?

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Dave Black snapped this astounding photo of the infamous cryptid known as the Jersey Devil in Galloway Township, New Jersey. Photo evidence is always welcome, as residents of Southern New Jersey and the region have been reporting sightings of this bizarre creature since 1909. Apparently it looks like a kangaroo with a goat's head, bat wings, cloven hooves, and the forked tail of, you guessed it, a devil. Below, a drawing of the infernal beast from a 1909 edition of the Philadelphia Bulletin.

"I was just driving past the golf course in Galloway on Route 9 and had to shake my head a few times when I thought I saw a llama," Black recounted in an email to NJ.com. "If that wasn't enough, then it spread out leathery wings and flew off over the golf course."

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Is this a real pterodactyl flying over Idaho?

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“This video made me laugh out loud,” said paleontologist Leif Tapanila, director of the Idaho Museum of Natural History. Read the rest

Loch Ness Monster was almost named after Queen Elizabeth

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Famed British conservationist Sir Peter Scott, who gave the Loch Ness Monster the scientific name of Nessiteras rhombopteryx as part of an effort to protect it as an endangered species in case it's real, originally tried in 1960 to get Queen Elizabeth to approve the name Elizabethia Nessiae. Read the rest

Listen to country songs about Bigfoot (c.1970)

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Yesterday, I went to a terrific parking lot record swap in San Rafael, California and I regret not purchasing "Bigfoot: (Northwest's Abominable Snowman)," an album of country tunes about my favorite cryptid sung by Don Jones. Check out these two songs from the LP, including the title track that includes the "real scream of the true Bigfoot (Sasquatch.)" Read the rest

The Resurrectionist: Your favorite mythic creatures laid out on a mortician's table

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Imagine all your favourite mythic creatures: pegasus, mermaid, centaur, sphinx, minotaur. Now imagine them laid out on a mortician’s table: dissected, given Latin medical labels, and analyzed in terms of their unique muscular and skeletal makeup. This is what we’re offered in the second part of E. B. Hudspeth’s The Resurrectionist in the section titled The Codex Extinct Animalia.

This intriguing novel does its best to defy categorization. Part One reads like a nonfiction textbook piecing together the biography of controversial 19th-century surgeon Dr. Spenser Black. Through reproduced letters, newspaper clippings and exhibition flyers we chart Black’s life: his early career as a stellar young surgeon, his marriage and the birth of his son; and then his rapid descent into infamy, gaining a reputation as a splicer of anatomies and an eccentric who believed that the creatures from our myths are in fact our evolutionary ancestors. Part Two presents his extensive drawings and writings, though it is left up to the reader to decide whether Black was a visionary or a madman.

The book’s beautifully macabre images capture the imagination instantly, but where Hudspeth really impresses is in the utter believability of Dr. Black’s story. The narrative is furnished with a fictional note from the publishers, and Black’s biography neatly intertwines with real 19th-century events. The Resurrectionist channels the aesthetics of Edgar Allan Poe while playing with form in the manner of Jorge Luis Borges. While the novel’s publisher Quirk Books has given us a wealth of visual treats in the last few years, The Resurrectionist still feels like the most immersive and fully realized book in their catalogue. Read the rest

World's most dedicated hunter of Loch Ness monster says he's not about to give up

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His current best guess is that "Nessie" is just a large catfish.

Beautiful grotesqueries for your wunderkammer

Seattle's Anthony Hicks has an Etsy store filled with beautiful grotesqueries, including carny sideshow gaffs (come for the feejee mermaid, stay for the mummified head!), but also tooth-filled pocketwatches and artfully preserved homunculi. Read the rest

Badass blankets: Shining, sasquatch, Cthulhu, ancient aliens

Some beautiful new housewares from the people who brought you the Krampus Christmas sweaters. Read the rest

The Loch Ness ladle

It's $21.80 and will make your tureen into a cryptozoological mystery. (via Kottke) Read the rest

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