Is this a real pterodactyl flying over Idaho?


“This video made me laugh out loud,” said paleontologist Leif Tapanila, director of the Idaho Museum of Natural History. Read the rest

Loch Ness Monster was almost named after Queen Elizabeth


Famed British conservationist Sir Peter Scott, who gave the Loch Ness Monster the scientific name of Nessiteras rhombopteryx as part of an effort to protect it as an endangered species in case it's real, originally tried in 1960 to get Queen Elizabeth to approve the name Elizabethia Nessiae. Read the rest

The Resurrectionist: Your favorite mythic creatures laid out on a mortician's table


Imagine all your favourite mythic creatures: pegasus, mermaid, centaur, sphinx, minotaur. Now imagine them laid out on a mortician’s table: dissected, given Latin medical labels, and analyzed in terms of their unique muscular and skeletal makeup. This is what we’re offered in the second part of E. B. Hudspeth’s The Resurrectionist in the section titled The Codex Extinct Animalia.

This intriguing novel does its best to defy categorization. Part One reads like a nonfiction textbook piecing together the biography of controversial 19th-century surgeon Dr. Spenser Black. Through reproduced letters, newspaper clippings and exhibition flyers we chart Black’s life: his early career as a stellar young surgeon, his marriage and the birth of his son; and then his rapid descent into infamy, gaining a reputation as a splicer of anatomies and an eccentric who believed that the creatures from our myths are in fact our evolutionary ancestors. Part Two presents his extensive drawings and writings, though it is left up to the reader to decide whether Black was a visionary or a madman.

The book’s beautifully macabre images capture the imagination instantly, but where Hudspeth really impresses is in the utter believability of Dr. Black’s story. The narrative is furnished with a fictional note from the publishers, and Black’s biography neatly intertwines with real 19th-century events. The Resurrectionist channels the aesthetics of Edgar Allan Poe while playing with form in the manner of Jorge Luis Borges. While the novel’s publisher Quirk Books has given us a wealth of visual treats in the last few years, The Resurrectionist still feels like the most immersive and fully realized book in their catalogue. Read the rest

World's most dedicated hunter of Loch Ness monster says he's not about to give up

His current best guess is that "Nessie" is just a large catfish.

Beautiful grotesqueries for your wunderkammer

Seattle's Anthony Hicks has an Etsy store filled with beautiful grotesqueries, including carny sideshow gaffs (come for the feejee mermaid, stay for the mummified head!), but also tooth-filled pocketwatches and artfully preserved homunculi. Read the rest

Badass blankets: Shining, sasquatch, Cthulhu, ancient aliens

Some beautiful new housewares from the people who brought you the Krampus Christmas sweaters. Read the rest

The Loch Ness ladle

It's $21.80 and will make your tureen into a cryptozoological mystery. (via Kottke) Read the rest

The Best Bigfoot Podcast

The Bigfoot Show is the best bigfoot podcast you're not listening to.

Weird gremlin photographed in China

What is this mysterious beast photographed by a tourist in the Huairou District valleys in northern Beiking, China? Read the rest

"Bigfoot of Endor" t-shirt

My wife says she always thought of Chewbacca as a space sasquatch; I just spotted this delightful "Bigfoot of Endor" t-shirt on Neatorama!

The forest moon was full of furry creatures of all shapes and sizes, and they generally got along just fine thanks to daily parties and plenty of libations, but when the critter they referred to as Bigfoot moved in things got pretty scary. He carried a big bowcaster and a bag full of tiny bones, and when he spoke it sounded like a sheep was being strangled. The little alien bear people now live in fear of the Bigfoot, hoping to one day hire a smuggler to come and take him away...
Read the rest

Hunt for living dinosaurs

Are there living dinosaurs in Cameroon or the Republic of Congo? This group thinks so, and they are headed back later this year to keep looking for the Mokèlé-mbèmbé, the legendary "one who stops the flow of rivers." Watch the video to learn about their quest. (via Daily Grail) Read the rest

Loch Ness Monster photo on Apple Maps?

Does this image of Loch Ness from Apple's Maps app depicts Nessie or the wake of a small boat? Unfortunately, I think it's the latter as we all know the Loch Ness Monster more closely resembles a pleiosaur than a giant catfish. (Forbes) Read the rest

1970 cryptozoology paperback cover painting found at yard sale

Above is the original glorious painting, artist unknown, used for the cover of the pseudonymous Warren Smith's 1970 book Strange Abominable Snowmen. Having been lost for decades, it recently turned up at a yard sale. I only wish I was the lucky duck who found it. Loren Coleman has the news along with a gallery of other fantastic cover art from vintage cryptozoology paperbacks of that era. Read the rest

This time it's real, says Bigfoot hoaxer

Rick Dyer claims to have killed a Bigfoot after luring it with some pork ribs he purchased at WalMart. "Every test that you can possibly imagine was performed on this body -- from DNA tests to 3D optical scans to body scans," Dyer says. "It is the real deal. It's Bigfoot and Bigfoot's here, and I shot it and now I'm proving it to the world." If Dyer's name sounds familiar, it's because of his impeccable reputation in the Bigfoot research community! He's one of the perps behind the 2008 Bigfoot hoax involving a rubber suit with freezer burn. Besides, everyone knows that Bigfoot is kosher. (KSAT) Read the rest

Is the yeti related to an ancient polar bear?

Is the yeti actually some hybrid of ancient polar bear and brown bear? University of Oxford geneticist Bryan Sykes has analyzed DNA from what's purported to be yeti hair samples. Read the rest

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