I have found a secret tunnel that runs underneath the phone companies and emerges in paradise

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Calyx is a famous, heroic, radical ISP that has been involved in groundbreaking litigation -- they were the first company to ever get a secret Patriot Act warrant unsealed, fighting for 11 years to overturn the gag order. Read the rest

Linux "lockout" tangle snarls Lenovo

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After failing to install Linux on a recent Lenovo laptop, a Reddit user claims to have received a short reply from Lenovo's support team: "This system has a Signature Edition of Windows 10 Home installed. It is locked per our agreement with Microsoft." Read the rest

New York Public Library installs high-tech, wall-climbing book-train

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The new conveyor system will open the week of October 3, ferrying books from the vast, subterranean archives beneath Bryant Park to researchers working in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street. Read the rest

Old school speech synthesizers perform Monty Python's "Argument" sketch

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John Cleese is played by the Intex Talker, Michael Palin is played by the Dectalk Express ("Perfect Paul modified to sound more like Stephen Hawking"), and the video was made by Per Kristian Risvik, who is an evil genius. I could watch the entirety of the Python oeuvre conducted like this, and in so doing perhaps put behind me John Cleese's shameful support for Brexit. (via Kottke) Read the rest

French schools use 3D printed anatomical clitoris models in sex-ed classes

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The amazing internal anatomy of the clitoris is a mystery that has surfaced and vanished in history, coming into focus in 2005 (!), when Royal Melbourne Hospital urologist Helen O'Connell published her groundbreaking MRI studies. Read the rest

1TB SD card puts one sixth of Wikipedia in your camera

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The first terabyte SD card will soon be sold by Sandisk. They were apparently first to 512GB too (don't, PNY's is cheaper), but no-one cared because that's not as arbitrarily interesting a number. No release date, no price. It'll be about $700.

Hitachi sold the world's first one terabyte hard disk drive in 2007, according to Wikipedia, one sixth of which would fit in a terabyte, assuming you're just counting the plain text of articles.

I wish there was an SD card format in the exact shape of tiny 3½-inch floppy disks, complete with a sliding metal hatch over the connectors and a free bootsector virus Read the rest

Wishlist for the ultimate music phone

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DJ Jesse Jarnow polled a bunch of "hardcore music nerds" to get their feature wish-list for a music-centric phone for Wired; here's what I suggested: Read the rest

HP detonates its timebomb: printers stop accepting third party ink en masse

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On September 13, owners of HP OfficeJet, OfficeJet Pro and OfficeJet Pro X began contacting third-party ink vendors by the thousand, reporting that their HP printers no longer accepted third-party ink. Read the rest

A modern rebuild of the Radio Shack 150-in-One electronics kit

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While looking into the Kano snap-together learning computer kit (Kickstarted in 2013, reviewed here last January) I got to thinking about Radio Shack's classic, much-loved 150-in-One Electronics Kit, which occupied literal years of my time when I was a boy. Read the rest

Design fiction, the Internet of Women's things, and futurism

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Jasmina Tesanovic (previously) and Bruce Sterling did a residency at The Arthur C. Clarke Center for Human Imagination at UCSD, working with the students on design fiction and futurism. Read the rest

How to make your own magic "forcing pad"

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"Svengali pads," are magic props that, like a Svengali deck of cards, selectively shaves down alternating leaves so that a performer can seemingly riffle all the pages but only display every second page. Read the rest

The $56 USB Killer is an electrified USB stick that will fry a laptop

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For €49.95, you can own a "USB Killer" that "instantly and permanently disables unprotected hardware" with a 200V DC shock. The €13.95 USB KILLER TESTER is a shield that blocks the killer from actually delivering its voltage to your machine (buy the tester, get the killer for half price). (via Schneier) Read the rest

Bell-jars with white, underlighting LED bases

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There is literally nothing in the world that isn't made cooler by being displayed in a bell-jar, and the addition of a diffused white LED base to the traditional jar in the Suck UK jar is a genius move that is obvious in retrospect. Read the rest

LED "clock" spells out the time in words

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If you're a longtime reader, you'll know that I love me some impractical timepieces; the LED Word Clock qualifies, with a set of stencil-text cutouts of words that are selectively lit by LEDs to tell you the time(ish); it measures 8" square and costs $74 and the major complaint from reviewers is that it is too bright, which strikes me as a feature, not a bug. Read the rest

"Anger Release Machine": a coin-op for shattering fine breakables

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In 2008, the Swiss/Danish design team Yarisal & Kublitz created their "Anger Release Machine," a vending machine stocked with "crystal glasses, plates, porcelain, various items" (the catalog helpfully adds "70 x 77 x 182 cm") -- insert coin, shatter breakables, feel better. Read the rest

Randomly Generated Catalog of Creepily Nondescript Domestic Surveillance Equipment

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The Cobham catalog, exposed by The Intercept, features countless pages of surveillance gadgets sold to U.S. police to spy on American citizens: tiny black boxes with a big interest in you. In the creepily bland feature lists and nerdy product names is a whisper of a dark future; perhaps darker than anyone can imagine.

Leaked Stingray manual shows how easy warrantless mass surveillance can be!

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The Intercept has got hold of a set of Harris's super-secretive manuals for their even-more-secret Stingray devices: fake cellular towers used to spy indiscriminately on whole populations by hacking their cellphones into giving up identifying information and more. Read the rest

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