That time my husband reported me to the Facebook police: a case study

[Stanford's Daphne Keller is a preeminent cyberlawyer and one of the world's leading experts on "intermediary liability" -- that is, when an online service should be held responsible for the actions of this user. She brings us a delightful tale of Facebook's inability to moderate content at scale, which is as much of a tale of the impossibility (and foolishness) of trying to support 2.3 billion users (who will generate 2,300 one-in-a-million edge-cases every day) as it is about a specific failure. We're delighted to get the chance to run this after a larger, more prestigious, longer running publication spiked it because it had a penis in it. Be warned: there is a willie after the jump. -Cory]

Those of us who study the rules that Internet platforms apply to online speech have increasingly rich data about platforms’ removal decisions. Sources like transparency reports provide a statistical big picture, aggregating individual takedown decisions. Read the rest

After Ways of Seeing, watch Robert Hughes' Shock of the New

In the Ways of Seeing post, commenter Frederick_Hagemeiste suggested the 1980 series Shock of the New. The first episode makes a compelling case that engineering had a vast influence on 20th century art. Read the rest

Five minute video about Gustave Caillebotte's painting, "Paris Street, Rainy Day"

James Earle spent a summer studying a single painting, Paris Street, Rainy Day, by Gustave Caillebotte, and made a short video about what he discovered. Read the rest

Can games learn from 19th century art?

Independent game developers are doing interesting things in smaller games by using the creative techniques and tools of some "higher-end", bigger game-makers, just like avant-garde impressionists once did.

Run a Renaissance art guild in this Leonardo da Vinci simulator

If you've ever dreamed of being—or perhaps of micromanaging—the great artists of the Italian Renaissance, then it's time to play Painters Guild.

Old Masters Buzzfeed

A tumblog of greatness. Read the rest

A walk through art history, told in a series of imaginative shoe designs

A series of designs with one goal in mind: “To create a shoe as a summation of an entire culture’s art.”

Memento Mori: the beautiful ways we have kept the dead among the living

Art historian Paul Koudounaris travelled the world, visiting 30 countries to document the practices—ancient to modern, solemn to joyous—by which human remains are displayed. From good luck charms to genocide memorials, his gorgeous art book Memento Mori collects the finds.