Boing Boing 

Apple announces Apple Music and native Watch apps

Its own News app and updates to OS X and iOS filled an unusually-packed lineup of new softwareRead the rest

The inside story of how the iPhone crippled BlackBerry

The Wall Street Journal has a juicy excerpt from Jacquie McNish and Sean Silcoff's new book, Losing the Signal: The Untold Story Behind the Extraordinary Rise and Spectacular Fall of BlackBerry.

The next day Mr. Lazaridis grabbed his co-CEO Jim Balsillie at the office and pulled him in front of a computer.

"Jim, I want you to watch this," he said, pointing to a webcast of the iPhone unveiling. "They put a full Web browser on that thing. The carriers aren't letting us put a full browser on our products."

Mr. Balsillie's first thought was RIM was losing AT&T as a customer. "Apple's got a better deal," Mr. Balsillie said. "We were never allowed that. The U.S. market is going to be tougher."

"These guys are really, really good," Mr. Lazaridis replied. "This is different."

"It's OK -- we'll be fine," Mr. Balsillie responded.

RIM's chiefs didn't give much additional thought to Apple's iPhone for months. "It wasn't a threat to RIM's core business," says Mr. Lazaridis's top lieutenant, Larry Conlee. "It wasn't secure. It had rapid battery drain and a lousy [digital] keyboard."

[via]

Finally, Apple Watch available in stores this month

The Apple Watch, Sport Edition.


The Apple Watch, Sport Edition.

After over a month of pre-sales and online-only availability, the Apple Watch will finally be on the shelves in Apple stores later this month. Consumers will be able to touch and try on the watch and then actually take it home the same day. Not that selling exclusively online has hurt the product: Apple has had an estimated  7-million Apple Watch orders since its launch and expects to deliver 5-million watches by the end of the first quarter, which is double what analysts had expected.  And Apple has by far outsold what the iPod, iPhone and iPad took in during their first quarter. Yet another win for Apple!

Apple must keep corporate monitor, says judge

Reuters

Apple has failed in a bid to rid itself of a court-appointed monitor, imposed on the tech company after it was accused of conspiring to raise the price of e-books.

Michael Bromwich's $1000-an-hour job is to ensure Cupertino is compliant with the outcome of the price-fixing case—an imposition that Apple claims is excessively burdensome, given that it must cut his checks. But the federal appeals court ruled that the environment must be "appropriately constrained" and that Bromwich can't be disqualified.

Michael Bromwich, a former Justice Department inspector general, began assessing Apple’s antitrust compliance policies six days after he was appointed in October 2013 by U.S. District Judge Denise Cote, who held the company liable

The case was a bitter one, given that the alleged price-fixing represented efforts by publishers and Apple, a newcomer to the market, to compete with Amazon's overwhelming domination of the ebook marketplace. Mat Honan summed it up like so:

But there were no heroes, and plenty of history coming home to roost for those involved.

Apple objects not only to the cost, but the scope of Bromwich's work. Bromwich says it's just playing games because it can't take its medicine.

According to Bromwich, Apple was pulling a shakedown. He’d filed a report on the company with the court, as had been required, and said Apple was furious with the results. The company, he argued, had been refusing to pay him as punishment.

"The monitoring team still lacks a significant amount of the information it needs to fulfill its monitoring obligations," Bromwich wrote in the report. "For these reasons, and others described in this report, the Monitor’s assessment of Apple’s antitrust compliance policies, procedures, and training remains preliminary."

"We're here in large part not because Apple objects to the fact that we wrote the report," Bromwich said. "We're commanded specifically to write that report and subsequent reports by the final judgment. They're objecting to our discretionary decisions about what to put in the report. There can be nothing more chilling to someone in my position to have the contents of a report challenged and for payment to be declined because the monitored entity isn't happy with what's in the report."

Son of China's richest man thinks two gold Apple Watches is enough for his dog

27-year-old Wang Sicong is the son of Wang Jianlin, worth about $34 billion dollars.

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Brute-force iPhone password guesser can bypass Apple's 10-guess lockout

The IP Box costs less than £200 and can guess all possible four-digit passwords in 111 hours.

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Wireless Bluetooth keyboard for $17

keyboardMy 11-year-old has been using an old keyboard on her hand-me-down computer setup. Some of the keys are worn down to the point of being blank.

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If dishwashers were Iphones


My latest Guardian column is design fiction in the form of an open letter from a dishwasher company whose kitchenware marketplace and Dish Rights Management system is under fire.

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Apple won't let EFF release a DRM-free app


EFF has released its mobile app to help people join in important, timely struggles, but you can't get it for your Iphone or Ipad, because Apple insists that EFF use DRM, and this is contrary to everything it stands for.

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FBI seizes LA school district's Ipad purchasing docs


It's not clear what they're investigating, but the DoJ subpoenaed everything related to the $70M program to give Ipads to all 650K kids in the district.

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Involuntary updates: a drama in an imaginary future Apple car


From law professor James "Public Domain" Boyle: a thrilling, chilling tale of life in an "ecosystem" when the company can arbitrarily "upgrade" the devices you depend on for llfe and limb, while they're hurtling down the road at 100mph.

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Furniture from old Apple G5 towers

klaus-geiger-benchmarc-apple-g5-power-mac-furniture-designboom-02-750x499

Klaus Geiger's concept design for minimalist furniture fashioned from the chassis of old Apple PowerMac G5 tower computers

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With this video, Apple's Jony Ive never needs to record another product pitch

Rob Walker says this Jony Ive Supercut "builds a kind of faux pitch for … well, every Apple thing ever, and all of those to come. To quote Ive himself (from this supercut), it's 'instantly familiar.'"

Reasons (not) to trust Apple's privacy promises

Apple's new Ios privacy policy makes some bold promises about their technology's wiretap-resistance, saying that even if Apple wanted to snoop on your messages, they couldn't, but as EFF co-founder John Gilmore points out, Apple's asking you to take an awful lot on faith here.

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The ultimate iPhone 6 and 6 Plus unboxing video by Andy Ihnatko (with Robert Goulet)

You do not need another unboxing video. This is the one unboxing video you need.

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Apple's Patriot-Act-detecting "warrant canary" dies


It's been less than a day since the company published its new, excellent privacy policy -- but Gigaom has noticed that the latest Apple transparency report, covering Jan 1-Jun 30 2014, has eliminated the line that says that the company has received no secret Patriot Act "section 215" requests, which come with gag orders prohibiting companies from discussing them.

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iPhone 6 Plus is the iPad Mini Minus.

...and that's exactly what I wanted, because I'm not a big caller. But maybe it's time to switch to Android, because they already have stuff just like it, and with some meatier hardware to boot.

The above graphic, published by OSXdaily, illustrates Apple's new selection of phone sizes--and also includes the iPad Mini, which lacks cellular calling but now seems part of a consistent spectrum. As one of those people who often finds the iPad Mini a little too big, but the current iPhone too small, I figure that the 6 Plus will be what I'm after. On the other hand, the Galaxy Note 4--slightly less wide than the 6 Plus, but significantly thicker--didn't quite sell itself to me, though that might be because Android is just not the language my thumbs speak.

Here's the specs for reference.

SPECS

Tell me what to buy. (Yes, a Moto F3, I know.)