WATCH: Glowy Zoey's 2014 LED costume is Minnie Mouse

Royce Hutain of GlowyZoey.com returns after last year's hit costume for daughter Zoey. This year's rainbow LED and Velcro homage to Minnie Mouse includes instructions on making your own.

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LEDs on pentagonal tiles for creating dynamic light sculptures

Matt Mets has a Kickstarter for something he calls BlinkyTile.

It's a fun little set of pentagonal LED circuit board tiles that you can solder together to make geometric shapes, and then program to make dazzling light shows. It's unique because the LEDs are all connected in parallel, but each one has it's own address, so you can make any kind of structural topology and still control each light individually. I would of course appreciate any attention I could get for it!

Video: maker of incredible working model engines

Retired naval mechanic José Manuel Hermo Barreiro makes incredibly intricate models of engines like the V-12. (via Devour)

Adam Savage, muscle man!

BB pal Adam Savage of Mythbusters is very proud of his incredible new muscle suit! Check out those guns and boulders!

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Video: circuit bending pioneer Reed Ghazala

In the studio with Reed Ghazala, "the father of circuit bending."

Vinyl record recycled into lamp

IMG 2925 Kopie Sandman "up cycled" a vinyl record and camera tripod into a neat studio lamp! (via Laughing Squid)

DIY X-Men: Pyro flamethrowers

Colin Furze, who made the amazing DIY Wolverine claws, continues his X-Men experimentation with wristworn Pyro flamethrowers; demo above, how-to video below (via Laughing Squid).

$5 programmable chemistry set inspired by music box

Stanford bioengineer Manu Prakash and his colleagues devised a $5 "chemistry set" that can be programmed to mix various reactants by punching holes in a paper tape and feeding it through the handheld device. Prakash says he was inspired by a hand-cranked music box. This latest device for what Prakash calls "frugal science" is on the heels of his amazing 50-cent folding microscope that I blogged previously.

"Music box inspires a chemistry set for kids and scientists in developing countries" (SCOPE)

Tech-art making class with Kal Spelletich (San Francisco)

Ingenious tech/robot artist Kal Spelletich of Seemen and Survival Research Labs fame is teaching a maker class in San Francisco on creating art involving technology! It sounds fantastic -- a rare opportunity to learn directly from a master of this genre that blends art, science, engineering, cultural criticism, and high weirdness. (Above, a two-minute video survey of Kal's storied career.) Kal says, "We will explore: building installations, carpentry, home-brewing, guerilla gardening, electric wiring, robotics, fire-making, fixing things, plumbing, pnu-matics, pumps, water purification, high-voltage electricity, video surveillance, electronic interfaces, scavenging for materials, cooking alternatives, solar power, skinning a rabbit, lighting, remote control systems, survivalist contemporary art history, and promoting and exhibiting your art.." Kal Spelletich: Research & Survival in the Arts Class

Bioengineer builds 50-cent paper microscope

Stanford bioengineer Manu Prakash devised a pretty amazing paper microscope that uses cheap tiny spherical lenses. The "Foldoscope" costs around 50 cents.

“I wanted to make the best possible disease-detection instrument that we could almost distribute for free,” Prakash says. “What came out of this project is what we call use-and-throw microscopy.”

"Stanford bioengineer develops a 50-cent paper microscope"

Formerly homeless maker reengineering the homeless shelter

Over at Institute for the Future's Future Now blog, my colleague Rebecca Chesney writes:

Marc Roth moved to San Francisco to make a better life for his family, but he soon became ill and unable to work. After six months living in a homeless shelter, he used assistance money to take classes at TechShop, a makerspace that provides tools and training for members. Marc learned new skills that led to starting his own laser cutting business, and, more importantly, he found support in an active and engaged community. Now Marc wants to help others who have fallen on hard times and don’t have the skills needed to enter today’s technology-driven economy. He founded The Learning Shelter, a 90-day program that provides housing, training, and mentorship for obtaining a job. A true extreme learner, Marc is teaching others what he learned: that the “permission to fail and encouragement to break through the walls you run into [are] absolutely necessary.”

The Indiegogo campaign is over but Marc's work has just begun: The Learning Shelter (Thanks, Gever Tulley!)

Dad makes son excellent "Mission Control Desk"

Jeff Highsmith made a fantastic "Mission Control Desk" for his young son who has just started school. It's hidden under a regular desktop.

White House Maker Faire taking place in 2014

BB pal Tom Kalil, Deputy Director for Technology and Innovation at the White House, sends word of the first White House Maker Faire taking place later this year. From the White House Blog:

Inspired by “Joey Marshmallow” and the millions of citizen-makers driving the next era of American innovation, we are thrilled to announce plans to host the first-ever White House Maker Faire later this year. We will release more details on the event soon, but it will be an opportunity to highlight both the remarkable stories of Makers like Joey and commitments by leading organizations to help more students and entrepreneurs get involved in making things.

Meanwhile, you can get involved by sending pictures or videos of your creations or a description of how you are working to advance the maker movement to maker@ostp.gov, or on Twitter using the hashtag #IMadeThis. Take Joey’s advice – don’t be bored, make something. Maybe you, like Joey, can take your making all the way to The White House.

"Announcing the First White House Maker Faire"

Russell "The Professor" Johnson, RIP

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Russell Johnson, who played iconic DIYer "The Professor" on Gilligan's Island, has died. He was 89. (CNN)