Last chance to buy a TV-B-Gone!


BB pal Mitch Altman informs us that he's ceased manufacturing on his marvelous invention the TV-B-Gone, a keychain remote control that turns off any television with a push of the button. It's great fun in sports bars, airports, restaurants, and wherever else there's an idiot box that annoys you! Grab one now because when they're gone, you'll have to make your own (also great fun). Mitch writes:

In 2003 I quit my job to explore ways of making a living doing what I love doing. It was kind of scary, since I had no idea how I would make enough money after quitting my work. But I knew that I had to quit doing what was only OK, to make time to explore what I truly love. One thing I knew was that I wanted to design and make one TV-B-Gone remote control -- just for me. I wanted to be able to turn TVs off in public places!

It took me a year and a half to make the first TV-B-Gone remote control. And when I did, I went all over San Francisco turning TVs off everywhere I went -- and enjoying the hell out of it! And, of course my friends all wanted one. So, I made them for all of my friends. But, oddly, most of their friends wanted one. And when it turned out that many of the friends of my friends' friends also wanted one, I thought it would be interesting to make a bunch.

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Bizarre mechanical techno music machine driven by a DJ turntable


Graham Dunning made this fantastic techno music-making contraption in which a DJ turntable triggers a variety of mechanical percussive sounds that are fed through effects boxes. Incredible!

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Man built an incredible underground bunker in his backyard


British maker and video host Colin Furze dug up his backyard and built a fantastic underground bunker under his lawn to save himself from the apocalypse or at least hide out and play videogames, rock out on his drum kit, and chow down on canned goods.

"There are more things to add such as air filtration and different power source but it's a great space," Furze says.

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Upvote this: Teach kids in underserved communities how to code with Minecraft

Camp Minecraft. The goal: Bring it to more kids whose families can't pay.

LA Makerspace co-founder Tara Tiger Brown shares a project that her kid-friendly maker workshop is trying to make a reality.

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Rube Goldberg Machine? More like Rube Slowberg Machine.


Inventor, director and tinkerer Bob Partington made what he claims is the world's slowest Rube Goldberg Machine. Read the rest

Fan of TV painting host Bob Ross? Watch the very first episode of his show.


What a gem was released upon the internet today! This video of Bob Ross: A Walk in the Woods, was Season 1 Episode 1 of his long-running “anyone can paint” television HOWTO show.

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Obama's coming for your Christmas drones


Amid growing fears about safety and security risks from unauthorized drone flights, federal regulators say they plan to require pretty much all recreational drones in the U.S. to be registered. Read the rest

Weird sights inside a French museum of miniature scenes

The Musée Miniature et Cinéma in Lyon, France is home to more than 100 miniature scenes painstakingly crafted by Dan Ohlmann. The artist is a former cabinetmaker and interior designer who has spent two decades hand-making these pocket universes.

"The subtle lighting arrangement, the painstaking replication of old textures, the use of the same original materials, all contribute to the creation of a moving poetry that resonates with each new miniature panorama."

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Fantastic DIY robot "juggles" more than five balls

Nathan Peterson built this fantastic "juggling" robot that can be programmed with different juggling patterns and handles more than five balls.

"I believe this is the first juggling robot to juggle more than 5 balls," Peterson says. "Yeah it's not toss juggling (into the air), but that would be my next project."

Build notes and images on imgur here.

Here's his full project page with previous designs.

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PocketLab: a $100 scientific "Swiss Army knife"


The PocketLab is billed as a "Swiss Army Knife of science." Launched via Kickstarter, the small device contains numerous sensors to measure acceleration, force, angular velocity, magnetic field, pressure, altitude, and temperature and send that data to smartphones or laptops. According to inventor Clifton Roozeboom, it's a tool for students and citizen scientists who can't afford to spend tens of thousands of dollars on lab equipment and will get the data they need from this $100 gadget. From IEEE Spectrum:

“If you are doing a classic experiment in AP physics, you might have, say, a track and a pulley and you want to attach a sensor to a cart to measure acceleration, force, and momentum transfer,” says Roozeboom. “The typical gear available is wired, plugs into a specialized handheld gadget with a host of menus to navigate. The students spend a lot of time understanding how to use the gear instead of learning concepts.” In other traditional physics experiments, Roozeboom says, the device can be attached to a rocket to study projectile motion, stuck to a pendulum to look at harmonic motion, or placed inside a tube to measure changes in pressure with volume.

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Man built full-size emoji keyboard(s)

Tom Scott built an "full-size, real-life emoji keyboard" from 14 keyboards labeled with 1,000 stickers to cover everything from Unicode 8. "It's a bit ridiculous," Tom says. 👏 Read the rest

Beautiful hand-cranked kinetic spiral sculpture


This fantastic sculpture by Clayton Boyer will delight, amaze, hypnotize, and/or induce motion sickness. He's posted the plans for sale and you can see how others have interpreted his basic design in this Flickr pool! Boyer writes:

This is Zinnia, a spring driven kinetic sculpture that will quietly run about 40 minutes on a full wind. Each of the two display wheels is 24" (61cm) in diameter, and as they change rotational speed and direction they create a variety of visually interesting shapes within the sculpture ~ as well as the contrasting shadows it projects against the wall behind. This is a very easy project to build and a great place to begin your kinetic sculpture and clock making journey. Zinnia's included wheel design is only one example of display wheel possiblities; you can create your own designs! The basic motive mechanism of the Zinnia will easily accept a wide variety of other display wheel sizes, shapes and forms. The possibilities for other variations in display wheel shapes is only limited by your imagination!

(via DIGG)

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Support this programmable smart watch kit developed by 8-year-old


Developed by an 8-year-old maker named Omkar, the O Watch is a 3D printable, programmable, smart watch kit for kids. Omkar has launched a Kickstarter to scale up the O Watch so other kids can use the platform "to learn programming, 3D printing and crafts." Support it! Read the rest

Amazing DIY computer control panel


If only all computer interfaces were as gloriously sci-fi as this excellent "DIY Overhead Control Panel" hand-built by a maker called Smashcuts. It features a slew of LEDs and 100 programmable buttons and switches that activate shortcuts on his PC, open apps, control volume and screen preferences, etc. Read the rest

Spectacular, swirling custom-built stone walls and furniture


Stonemasons Andreas Kunert and Naomi Zettl of Ancient Art of Stone elevate the art of stonemasonry with carefully designed and positioned decorative stone walls. Read the rest

3D printed chess set where each piece holds a tiny plant


After this Bauhaus-inspired pattern from XYZ Workshop is downloaded and printed, each chess piece is designed as a mini-planter. Read the rest

Father builds glowing life-sized Minecraft block for son's birthday


Nathan Pryor (HaHaBird) made this fantastic life-sized illuminated Minecraft block for his son's birthday. It's lit with RGB LEDs so the color can be changed via remote control. Read the rest

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