Boing Boing 

BoXZY all-in-one 3D printer, CNC mill, & laser engraver

Maker Ben Saks of KinetiGear is crowdfunding BoXZY, a desktop fabricator bringing micromanufacturing to the masses. Users can shape wood, plastics, and many metals using most commercial CAM programs.

Read the rest

Hacking a laser-cutter to play real-world Space Invaders

Martin sez, "I just completed my silliest projects to date: while running the risk of turning my laser cutter into a giant fire ball I actually succeeded in turning it into a real world version of the Space Invaders game."

Read the rest

Carving a spoon a day

Stian Korntved Ruud has been carving a new wooden spoon once a day. Some of them are wild.

Read the rest

Hoax photos of real events


Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger normally produce beautiful commercial photos, but their hobby is recreating iconic photos -- the Hindenberg's explosion, Nessie 1934, Tiananmen 1989, 9/11, and more -- in miniature, so that their replicas are virtually indistinguishable from the originals.

Read the rest

Book Preview: The Boy Who Played with Fusion

boy

This June, Harcourt releases The Boy Who Played with Fusion: Extreme Science, Extreme Parenting, and How to Make a Star. Written by journalist Tom Clynes, the book got its start as a 2012 Popular Science story of the same name. I've been reading an early galley and love the way Clynes weaves tales of a precocious youngster, his wise parents, and his baffled teachers. It’s an inside look at raising a typical, angsty teen, except one who gives Ted talks on the weekends and hangs with world-class physicists.

Taylor hadn’t realized that his biggest challenge, by far, would be to create a workable vacuum. He needed enough negative pressure to create an almost empty space for his subatomic particles to travel. If any gas or air molecules were left inside the tube, the high-energy particles would collide with them and lose energy. “Imagine a freeway in Los Angeles and you want to go 100 miles an hour,” Taylor explains. “If you try that at rush hour you’re going to hit other cars. But in the middle of the night it’s wide open and you can go fast.”

To pump out the tube, Taylor used a refrigerator compressor and wired it to run backward. Then, Taylor loaded the deuterium gas he’d generated. “I was so excited,” he says. “Me and Tom got the Van de Graaff up to 200,000 volts, and with the Model-T arc we tried to get plasma going.”

But even though they used higher-tech fasteners than Lawrence did in the 1930s, they had trouble creating enough vacuum to get a sustained plasma field, and a clear enough path to accelerate particles to any measurable degree. They tweaked the fasteners and tried all sorts of sealant—silicon rubber, epoxy, “and a few other things,” says Taylor. “We were using techniques from the sixties and seventies, and we modernized them, but with our expertise and materials we could only go so far. Most of it worked. But not the big picture.”

boy2

Astounding RC flying with counterrotating drive

Barry writes, "There's a thing called pattern flying, where pilots compete to perfectly execute an elaborate set of compulsory tricks."

Read the rest

Bondic: multipurpose liquid UV-curing plastic adhesive

Bondic is a UV-curing liquid plastic adhesive that can stick together materials that usually require different kinds of glues to bond.

Read the rest

A Wisconsin grain silo renovated into three-story fort

tree4

In a great reuse of old infrastructure, a carpenter in West Bend, Wisconsin is turning his family's vacant grain silo into a play room. He started the project last summer and expects to finish in the new few weeks.
tree2 tree3 tree5

West Bend man builds ultimate “tree house” [Fox6Now]

THIS TOOK FOREVER

A truer-words-never-spoken woven label to sew into your crafting projects. (via Making Light)

How to make a technicolor igloo

igloo4.jpg copy

Firefighter Jostein Alvestad built this igloo in his backyard by filling 32 plastic buckets with colored water each night. In a Chicago magazine story, he describes the fun of sleeping and hanging out inside by candlelight. The exterior issues a soft glow when a flashlight is brought inside.

igloo3

igloo2

igloo

Igloos are usually built with snow that has sintered, or compacted, in the wind. A good guide to more traditional structures is How to Build an Igloo: And Other Snow Shelters.

When Life Gives Him Ice, He Makes a Crazy, Rainbow-Colored Igloo [Chicago]

Giant cat or hyper-detailed model cars?

Headquake claims this a scratch-built RC car. I'm not buying it. He's been breeding giant housecats.

Read the rest

Teen makes Arduino compatible with rechargeable battery

Quin Etnyre is one of the coolest kids I know. He saved my butt a few years ago when he was my "assistant" at an Arduino workshop I gave.

Read the rest

Awesome, nerdy, bookish, fannish skirts, bags, scarves and stuff


Rooby on the Isle of Wight turns nerdy fabric prints into garments and accessories: Death Star, Walking Dead BEWARE OF ZOMBIES signs, Incredible Hulk blow-up, Rocky Horror, Heroes of Star Wars, antique book-spines, and the first chapter of Harry Potter (which, sadly, is no longer available as a dress).

Read the rest

Nerdy status-badges for kids


Isiah Saxon made a set of amazing badges for DIY, a program to teach kids skills.

Read the rest

FedEx won't ship milling machine that makes untraceable guns

Defense Distributed sells a $1500 digital mill called the Ghost Gunner. Among other things, it can carve an aluminum AR-15 rifle body without a serial number. FedEx refuses to ship it.

“This device is capable of manufacturing firearms, and potentially by private individuals,” FedEx spokesperson Scott Fiedler wrote in a statement. “We are uncertain at this time whether this device is a regulated commodity by local, state or federal governments. As such, to ensure we comply with the applicable law and regulations, FedEx declined to ship this device until we know more about how it will be regulated.”

But buying, selling, or using the Ghost Gunner isn’t illegal, nor is owning an AR-15 without a serial number, says Adam Winkler, a law professor at UCLA and the author of Gunfight: The Battle over the Right to Bear Arms in America. “This is not that problematic,” he says. “Federal law does not prohibit individuals from making their own firearms at home, and that includes AR-15s.”

Horrifying knit goods


Brooklyn's Knitrocious creates nightmarish knit goods, such as the goat balaclava and the horror clown balaclava.

Read the rest