Best of MAKE, Vol 2: 65 cool DIY projects from the magazine


My favorite part of MAKE has always been the how-to projects, and this second volume of the Best of MAKE contains complete instructions for 65 projects ranging from a sous vide cooker, to a beginners Arduino Robot, to a helium balloon imaging "satellite," to a cigar box guitar (written by yours truly). Most of these projects were published while I was editor-in-chief of MAKE, and it's great to see them available in one low cost volume. The Kindle edition is just $8. The first volume of the Best of MAKE is still in print, too. Read the rest

New Zealand's lost colossus: all-mechanical racetrack oddsmaking computer


In 1913, George Julius installed a building-sized, all mechanical odds-calculating computer at Auckland, NZ's Ellerslie racetrack, powered by huge iron weights that slowly pulled down bike chains over sprockets, driving the clockwork device as it "totalised" all the bets laid on horses at the track, keeping the odds in constant balance so that all the bettors were effectively betting against one another, in a system called "pari-mutuel" betting. Read the rest

GIF Dance Party lets you get down with all your favorite loops


There's even a dancing baby! It's based on a mobile installation for hire that prompts your guests to turn themselves into loops that they can then drag around on a virtual stage. Read the rest

A fictional but physically real world of dolls that heal a beaten man


See sample pages from this book at Wink.

For much of the 1990s, Mark Hogancamp of Kingston, New York, adhered to a predictable pattern of waking up, going to work, returning home, drinking as much as a half-gallon of vodka, and then passing out. He was a serious alcoholic, as Hogancamp and Chris Shellen make clear in Welcome to Marwencol (Shellen produced a documentary on Hogancamp’s life in 2010). He also liked to dress in women’s clothes.

Hogancamp didn’t know it, but this last fact would change his life when he drunkenly mentioned it to a stranger in the Luny Tune Saloon, sometime before closing in the wee hours of April 8, 2000. Shortly after exiting the bar, he was brutally beaten by the man and four others, who left his broken and bloodied body in the middle of the street. He would spend nine days in a coma and more than a month in the hospital.

After his release, Hogancamp’s recovery was aided, essentially, by playing with dolls. He got into it when he rediscovered his childhood interest in World War II miniatures. The tiny objects, though, were too small for Hogancamp’s shaky, post-recovery hands to paint, so the owners of his local hobby shop suggested he try detailing figures at a larger 1:6 scale. Dressing the figures proved good therapy for Hogancamp, and before long he had moved on to Barbies and action figures, for whom he eventually built a fictional but physically real place called Marwencol, named after himself, a friend named Wendy, and a neighbor named Colleen. Read the rest

Gorgeous book of paper airplanes collected by anthropologist Harry Smith


h Brian writes, "Avant-garde film maker and producer of the highly influential Anthology of American Folk Music series Harry Smith was also an avid collector of folk art. This book compiles some 251 paper airplanes Smith collected from off the streets of New York City, along with the date and location at which they were recovered. It's a really beautiful collection." Read the rest

Inkjet Samhain: awesome, printable Hallowe'en masks


Super Punch's annual roundup of printable Hallowe'en masks includes some old faves and some stunning new entries in the race to celebrate a truly incredible inkjet Samhain. Read the rest

This USB charger is powered by an electric wheelchair


Josh Winkler is the engineer & inventor behind Cripple Concepts - an innovative startup that provides assistive tech for people with disabilities, made and designed by people with disabilities.

Read the rest

Handmade glowing radio-tube USB drives


Created by Latvia's Slavatech, these glowing, copper-chased USB drives come in 8/16/32/64GB starting at $39 -- they glow LED blue when plugged in. (via M1k3y) Read the rest

Stylish furniture made from discarded supermarket trolleys


Dutch designer Etienne Reijnders rescues discarded shopping trolleys made by Wanzl, purveyor of the world's largest trolleys, and remakes them into beautiful, minimalist pieces of mid-century-modern-inflected furniture. Read the rest

Astounding showpiece table full of hidden compartments nested in hidden compartments


Custom furniture maker Craig Thibodeau created this showpiece "Automaton Table" to illustrate all the different ways that he can hide secret compartments in the pieces he builds. Read the rest

You can make almost anything with a Glowforge


The dream of desktop manufacturing is now a reality. Take a look at the incredible variety of things you can make with a Glowforge laser cutter, from wallets to leather sandals, lamps to dollhouses, jewelry to phone cases. In this video Glowforge CEO Dan Shapiro shows how easy it is to make a laser cut item simply by drawing your design on a piece of material. Visit to get $100 off a Glowforge today. [Sponsored Post] Read the rest

Kickstarting a tough, flexible first responder axe carved from AR400 armor plate

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Peter writes, "We spent the summer doing user-centered design (researching, designing, prototyping and building) around fire-fighting - specifically rural and volunteer first-responder fire fighters." Read the rest

How to make things with a Glowforge laser cutter


Glowforge is a 3D laser printer that uses a beam of light the width of a human hair to cut, engrave, and shape designs from a variety of materials. In this video, Glowforge founder and CEO Dan Shapiro shows us how to make an acrylic Jackhammer Jill (Boing Boing’s mascot) in a matter of minutes. Check out to find out what else you can make with a Glowforge and get a special $100 discount on top of the 50% off pre-order price. The offer expires this Friday Oct. 23 at 6pm PT, so order yours today! (‪sponsored post‬) Read the rest

MAKE: an open hardware, 3D printed cellphone photo-studio


Paolo Kiefe writes, "I love 3D printing and the maker movement. I thought that you might like this design from an open hardware project called #3DBenchy that aims to create more public awareness for applied 3D printing. This is a photo-studio that makes it easy to hold a smartphone to consistently take photos and videos of objects." Read the rest

Entropy explained, beautifully, in comic-book form


Nick Sousanis became a Boing Boing favorite for his 2015 doctoral dissertation in graphic novel form, and since attaining his PhD, he's become a postdoctoral fellow in Comics Studies at the University of Calgary. Read the rest

This 3D-printed, portable railgun fires slugs at 560 miles per hour


David Wirth 3D printed a 20lb railgun that fires copper-plated tungsten slugs with 1,800 joules of energy, firing them at 560mph, with so much force that they vaporize on contact with a steel-backed target. Read the rest

A chess-set you wear in a ring


The tiny board, made from fossil ivory and ebony, flips up on wincy hinges to reveal 32 minuscule chess pieces. The ring itself is sterling silver, and there's only one of them, made by Arduosity, who notes "I can tell you it is impossible, near imposible to set up." Read the rest

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