Income inequality turns "neglected tropic diseases" into American diseases of "the poor living among the wealthy"

The deadly infectious diseases that were eradicated in America during the 20th century are now roaring back, thanks to growing poverty, failing sanitation, and underinvestment in science and health research and regulation. Read the rest

This is why chameleons are so amazing


National Geograph explores the magic and mystery. Read the rest

Scientists growing new arms for monkeys


Bioengineers are developing methods to grow new arms for monkeys using human progenitor cells that can become blood cells, vessels, and other tissue. Read the rest

US lobbying for TPP to lock up clinical trial data

Copyright only extends to creative works, not facts, meaning that clinical trial data (and other data sources) are in the public domain as soon as they're published -- unless governments create special "sui generis" rights to scientific research data. Read the rest

Shakespeare probably smoked weed, scientists say


Several pipes excavated from William Shakespeare's garden contained cannabis, report scientists who used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to analyze the items. Read the rest

Using neuroscience to know what you want before you know it

Moran Cerf (previously) writes, "Can someone else know what we want a little before we do? And if so - who is in charge of our decisions?" Read the rest

Revealed for the first time: the seer stone that translated the Book of Mormon

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has published photos of what they claim is their prophet's talking magical rock.

Mobile game of the week: Specimen, A Game About Color

It's a fact that the sky is blue. But is my blue the same as yours? This fantastic app gamifies the quest to find out more about the differences in how humans perceive color, and it's surprisingly challenging and hooky.

Watch Bill Nye read mean Tweets about himself

My favorite: "You pretend the global warming fairy is real even as you live in a mansion. Maybe do cartwheels for voodoo." (Wut?) Read the rest

Earthquake early warning system gets a $4 million boost from USGS

A demo of the ShakeAlert warning system prototype, in action.
What if there were a way to warn people right before a big earthquake hits? Earthquake early warning system technology is already serious stuff in Japan, and a system in development for the U.S. just got some serious funding.

X-Files was inspired by Chris Carter's observation of alien abductees' hypnosis


In the early 1990s, Harvard psychiatrist John Mack studied hundreds of people who claimed to have been abducted by aliens and wrote multiple books about his research. He invited Chris Carter to sit in on one of Mack's regression hypnosis session with a self-proclaimed abductee, an experience that Carter says informed his vision for the X-Files. Read the rest

Video: How do pygmy seahorses end up on matching corals?

Pygmy seahorses come in many colors, and biologists wondered whether they seek out coral that matches perfectly, or changed color somehow to match the coral they find. Read the rest

Cooking rice in a coffee pot flushes out arsenic

Rice contains more of the carcinogen arsenic than other grains, but researchers at Queen’s University Belfast, UK found that cooking rice in a simple coffee pot removed about half the arsenic. Read the rest

Man born with "virtually no brain" has advanced math degree

The subject of this paper grew up with a normal cognitive and social life, and didn't discover his hydrocephalus -- which had all but obliterated his brain -- until he went to the doctor for an unrelated complaint. Read the rest

Watching a sphere of water bubble in space in 4K resolution: Yup, pretty cool

The reaction of putting an effervescent antacid tablet into water was filmed with the Red Epic Dragon Camera, on board the ISS.

How to name an exoplanet, by XKCD

Screen Shot 2015-07-24 at 11.08.36 AM
XKCD's hot take on the recent space news around Kepler 452-B and Pluto.

NASA unveils gorgeous new false-color image of Pluto

It may be 'shopped, and we can tell by the pixels, but it's just the most beautiful image of Pluto mankind has ever seen.

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