Adobe makes sending images Lightroom to Photoshop on iPad a thing

Photoshop kinda sucked when Adobe introduced it to the iPad last year. Months in, Photoshop for iOS is still such a flummoxing disappointment when I need to tinker with an image on my tablet. I pay for Adobe's Photography Plan (its ability to automatically sync images between devices keeps me sane), but still need to use the currently more capable Affinity Photo for iPad, for some tasks. Happily, Photoshop's development team has been taking baby steps, since its initial release, to provide more of the functionality seen in the app's desktop version. Their latest addition? The ability send images between the iOS iteration of Lightroom to Photoshop.

From The Verge:

Moving files into and between Adobe’s apps has been one of the small but frustrating challenges of using them on the iPad. It was years before you could import photos directly from an SD card. Moving back and forth between Lightroom and Photoshop is a really common workflow for editors, so this addition should make the process a lot quicker and more convenient. Editors could do it before, but they’d have to manually export and import the updated files every time they wanted to change apps.

Now, if they'd just get luminosity range masking up and running in Lightroom for iOS, I'd have one less reason to sit in front of my computer. If you're an iPad user, moving an image over to Photoshop from Lightroom to edit, is a cinch.

If you haven't done so already, update Lightroom for iOS up to it's most recent release. Read the rest

Adobe is starting to sort out Photoshop for iPad's lousy feature set

Let me give it to you straight: Photoshop for iPad isn't great. Over the past year, creatives who rely on their iPadOS tablet to take care of photographic business have been promised the moon by Adobe. Instead, we got handfuls of green cheese. It was supposed to have the all of the power and capabilities of the desktop version of the app at launch. Nope: I, along with what I am sure are many others, was disappointed to find that the company that pretty much wrote the book on computer-aided image editing had released an app that was easily outclassed by apps like Affinity Photo and Pixelmator, the latter of which has been around since 2014. Happily, Adobe took a baby step towards climbing to the top of the mobile photo editing dog pile by adding a feature to Photoshop for iPad that should have been there since day one: the Subject Select tool.

From The Verge:

This addition marks the first real improvement to Photoshop for iPad since it was released last month to disappointing reviews. The tool should go a long way toward quelling one of the biggest criticisms of the v1 version of the app, which was the lack of a Magic Wand tool.

Aside from Select Subject, Photoshop for iPad is also getting some UI improvements and speed improvements for its Cloud documents. Cloud PSDs, which were introduced with the app and allow users to access their Photoshop files from any device, will now upload and download up to 90 percent faster.

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How to easily batch geotag DSLR photos in Lightroom

Having spent hundreds of dollars on glass tripods and other camera accessories for my iPhone, it's fair to say that I'm neck-deep in love with iPhone photography. However, there are still some situations where pulling up my trust Sony RX100 III to capture a moment is a better choice. It's a wonderful camera, but it lacks GPS. To get around this issue, after taking a photo with my RX100, I often snap off a throwaway shot with my iPhone for the sake of capturing the location information. I've been doing it for years.

This video covers a bit of this, but it also goes a step further by illustrating how to batch import GPS coordinates for a single location into multiple images via Lightroom Classic. Unfortunately, I haven't figured out how to preform the trick described in the video using Lightroom for iOS or Android, but it works a treat with the desktop version of the app.

Image via Pixabay Read the rest

The cloud vs humanity: Adobe terminates every software license in Venezuela, keeps Venezuelans' money

If you live in Venezuela and rely on Adobe products to do your job -- whether that's publishing a newspaper, running an NGO, or doing design work, Adobe has a very special message for you: GO FUCK YOURSELF. Read the rest

FedEx still begging suckers to install Flash for online print orders

Yesterday I went to FedEx.com to order some printed fliers from my desktop. Sounds easy enough, right? Wrong. Along with other idiots committed to proprietary Flash UI, FedEx is one of the last holdouts who won't let customers give them money unless they install Flash. So VistaPrint got my business. Read the rest

The future of fake news is real-time video manipulation

Nick Bilton reports on the next round of fake news tools that allow users to manipulate audio and video to change what's being said, a sort of real-time Photoshop for moving images and audio. Want to make it look like a celebrity used a taboo word, or misquote a politician? No problem! Read the rest

Google to kill Flash by default in Chrome.

Commanding two thirds or so of the browser market, Google's decision to turn off Adobe Flash by default in Chrome before 2017 seems like the end of an era that's always said to be ending.

Later this year we plan to change how Chromium hints to websites about the presence of Flash Player, by changing the default response of Navigator.plugins and Navigator.mimeTypes. If a site offers an HTML5 experience, this change will make that the primary experience. We will continue to ship Flash Player with Chrome, and if a site truly requires Flash, a prompt will appear at the top of the page when the user first visits that site, giving them the option of allowing it to run for that site (see the proposal for the mock-ups).

As usual, there are exceptions, starting with an official list of exempted Flash-serving domains. Can you guess what they are?

YouTube.com Facebook.com Yahoo.com VK.com Live.com Yandex.ru OK.ru Twitch.tv Amazon.com Mail.ru

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Even Strong Bad and Homestar Runner concede that Flash is dead

Fifteen years after the Flash animation web stars first graced our screens, even Strong Bad and Homestar Runner are ready to throw the shroud over Flash. Read the rest

Adobe responds to scandalous news of secretly spying on readers (not really)

A week ago, Adobe was caught spying on people's reading habits -- they index all your books and send a full dossier to themselves, in the clear. Now, they've responded to the American Library Association (whose members are the major customers for this terrible stuff) by saying they'll say something next week. (Thanks, Jay!) Read the rest

Cloud computers are computers you can only use with someone else's permission

As Adobe Creative Suite struggles with its license-server outage, stranding creative professionals around the world without a way of earning their living, a timely reminder: a cloud computer is a computer you're only allowed to use if the phone company and a DRM-peddling giant like Adobe gives you permission, and they can withdraw that permission at any time. Read the rest