Artist is animating "This is America" with vintage Mac software

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In progress: Capturing Donald Glover dance in This Is America video. Using Macintosh SE computer, MacPaint software & MacroMind software. Currently: 375 frames.

A post shared by Pinot (@pinot) on Jul 4, 2018 at 4:18pm PDT

New York City animator and illustrator Wahyu Ichwandardi (aka @pinot) is currently animating Childish Gambino's "This is America" music video in MacPaint (software from 1984) and MacroMind VideoWorks (1985) on a Macintosh SE. On Thursday, he was 375 frames in. He's been sharing his progress on Twitter since June 9:

https://twitter.com/pinot/status/10099711558040084498 Read the rest

The hotel where Steve Jobs unveiled the first Macintosh prototype in 1983 (and why Apple got banned from it)

In Apple's early days, the swanky La Playa Carmel hotel was on the list of preferred venues for the company's offsite retreats. Carmel-By-The-Sea's quaint charm coupled with the property's privacy made it an ideal spot for their gatherings.

In fact, it was where the company's Macintosh retreat was held in late January of 1983. That's where Steve Jobs first revealed the team's Macintosh computer prototype, right there in the hotel's ocean-view banquet room.

I am just back from EG, a fantastic conference for/by/of creatives held in Carmel-By-The-Sea, and ate dinner in that room.

This room...

EG's director Michael Hawley pointed out this commemorative plaque, which resides on the room's back wall.

It reads, "In this room Steve Jobs unveiled the MacIntosh computer prototype during a development team retreat, and ceremoniously christened it with a bottle of La Playa Carmel water."

Hawley also shared the rest of the story. Apparently things got a little wild at this gathering, resulting in getting Apple banned from the hotel for 30 years. The team -- who were drunk -- stripped naked and jumped in the hotel's pool ("oblivious to the polite strangling sounds of the blue-haired ladies all around," according to author Frank Rose) and then headed to the beach to start a bonfire. The next morning the hotel politely asked them to not return.

In 2013, the hotel changed ownership and Apple was invited back with the message, "All is forgiven."

Read: Carmel hotel ends ban on Apple retreats 30 years after skinny-dipping incident (2013 article)

photos by Rusty Blazenhoff Read the rest

Lego Macintosh Classic with working e-ink display

Jannis Hermanns built a lovely little Macintosh Classic from Lego and brilliantly integrated a 2.7" e-ink display controlled by a Raspberry Pi Zero. He kindly posted his build plans right here.

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Plugable dock lets you power everything from a single USB-C port

My nephew got the new Macbook, with its single USB-C port. I wondered what Apple was thinking. Our friends at Plugable wondered too, but unlike me, they are doing something about it -- Kickstarting a USB-C universal docking station. Read the rest

Wireless Bluetooth keyboard for $(removed)

My 11-year-old has been using an old keyboard on her hand-me-down computer setup. Some of the keys are worn down to the point of being blank. Read the rest

Slicereader displays online text one paragraph at a time

Mutahhir Ali Hayat wrote on his blog:

I probably have ADHD, but I don’t want to get checked. I’m afraid the doctor will confirm that I’m a serial procrastinator. Don’t get me wrong, I usually get my work done, but I would like to go about it better and get more work done than I do now.

I also can’t read long technical articles without getting lost most of the time. I find myself skipping forward without notice, and having to retrace my steps. I get frustrated eventually, grit my teeth, put my finger on the screen and read really slowly. To make matters worse many websites have small fonts, stingy line spacing and too much text on the same page.

So he created an app for Macintosh called Slicereader, which breaks text into paragraphs that are displayed one-per-page. To advance to the next paragraph, you press the spacebar.

It comes in a free version and a $2.99 version.

(Via brettterpstra.com) Read the rest

LEGO Macintosh model

Exquisite LEGO model of the original Apple Macintosh by Chris McVeigh, aka powerpig on Flickr. Read the rest

For Steve

Here I am, days after I was born, being held by my father in front of the family Macintosh.

Our family has spent an enormous amount of time and effort growing with Apple. My brother and I spent years playing with Kid Pix and Shufflepuck Café. We stayed up late reading through the manuals for Myst and plotting our progress in the provided journal. We collected the bunnies in Power Pete.

My dad bought the iLife suite as soon as it came out. It was a regular joke at home that we were "living the iLIFE!" I made videos for class. We started saving photos on the computer and sharing them with family. Recently, my dad finished scanning all our family photos and videos. It's an invaluable gift to be able to smoothly find photos of my parents' wedding, or to watch my brother being silly at the kitchen table before a cub scout meeting.

When I chose to go to boarding school in northern Maine for my last two years of high school, I bought my first iMac to celebrate. I would never have survived the unexpected challenges of living with a hundred other students surrounded by fifteen feet of snow had I not been able to retreat online and to talk to my mom on iChat on a daily basis. I still IM my mom nearly every day.

And when things went wrong, it was okay to expect perfection from Apple. They made things right for us, every time. Read the rest