Two photographers, unbeknownst to one another, shoot the same picture at the same moment

When Ron Risman posted a photo of the Whaleback Lighthouse in New Hampshire, a commenter accused him of ganking a photo just posted by Eric Gendron. When Risman saw Gendron's photo, he suspected he had ganked him: the two shots were seemingly identical. Close inspection of the waves and railings, however, show a slight deviation in perspective: the two men were barely yards apart when their shutters blinked in unison.

I tried to make a pseudo-3D GIF (below) -- almost there! Perhaps it would work better with higher-resolution shots to align everything up more perfectly.

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A simple comic about keeping things in perspective

The illustration comes from Owl Turd Comix. Read the rest

Is new stem cell research super important, or kind of a big yawn?

It depends on who you ask. Earlier this week, researchers announced that they'd successfully turned adult skin cells into embryonic stem cells. Headlines were made — including more than one that heralded this as the first step in human cloning. If you believe The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, and Fox News, this research was a big deal. The Boston Globe and The Washington Post, however, had a different take. According to those sources, this is more of a technical advance (but not one that counts as a "breakthrough") and something that's unlikely to have any clinical relevance whatsoever. Read the rest

Great dad dies (also, he was a scientist)

Handsome Dad of the Year (a former brunette) took out the garbage without fail, did the family shopping, and is remembered fondly by his step-daughters/first-cousins-once-removed. Also, outside the home, he discovered something called "relativity". Jennie Dusheck has a great follow up to a story that Xeni posted about earlier today. Read the rest

Cats and optical illusions: Now with control experiments!

Last week, I posted about a YouTuber who thinks his he might have tricked his cat with an optical illusion that's based on very human psychology. He asked other people to test the illusion on their cats, just to get some more data points. Now, the psychologists who created the illusion have pitched in to help out, posting a modified version that doesn't elicit the sensation of motion. Show your cat both versions and see whether it's the paper she's trying to kill, or the "rotating" circles. (Thanks to Diana Issidorides!) Read the rest