Banksy's brilliant idea to make "everyone happy" after activists pulled down Bristol slave trader statue

In Bristol, England, anti-racism protestors pulled down a bronze statue of slave trader and philanthropist Edward Colston and rolled it into the River Avon. Banksy, who is thought to live in Bristol, posted a brilliant idea that could please "both those who miss the Colston statue and those who don’t."

"We drag him out the water, put him back on the plinth, tie cable round his neck and commission some life size bronze statues of protestors in the act of pulling him down," Banksy wrote on Instagram. "Everyone happy. A famous day commemorated." Read the rest

Artist turned crossing light into Black Power fist

View this post on Instagram

✊🏽✊🏿✊🏻✊🏾✊🏼

A post shared by Pablo Rochat (@pablo.rochat) on Jun 9, 2020 at 7:39am PDT

Amazing what can be made with some gaffers tape, a pair of scissors, and a step ladder. San Francisco Artist Pablo Rochat shows how's it done.

(Nag on the Lake)

screengrab via Pablo Rochat Read the rest

Smashed window in Memphis brilliantly labeled as artwork

"Lost a window to the riot, didn't lose an opportunity," writes Memphis resident Tagawat on r/Memphis.

(Thanks, Jeff Cross!) Read the rest

Banksy installed a stunning artwork in a hospital; its auction will raise money for healthcare

Banksy hung this stunning painting in the foyer of Southampton General Hospital's emergency department. Apparently the installation of the framed, one meter square artwork was completed in cahoots with the hospital management. Video below.

Banksy left a note that reads, "Thanks for all you're doing. I hope this brightens the place up a bit, even if its only black and white."

According to the BBC, "the painting will remain at Southampton General Hospital until the autumn when it will be auctioned to raise money for the [UK's National Health Service]."

Read the rest

Fascinating short doc about Keith Haring's mural in Melbourne and its stolen signature

In 1984, pioneering street artist Keith Haring painted a mural in Collingwood, Melbourne at a school there. Today, that mural is only one of 31 Haring murals that still exist, but it was almost lost to time and controversy. Above is "Keith Haring Uncovered," a documentary telling the story of Haring's time down under and what happened after he was gone. From CityLab:

Collingwood was an industrial, blue-collar neighborhood when Haring arrived, but gentrification has swept through recently, filling it up with art galleries and expensive real estate. The school closed in 1987. In 2004, the mural was added to the Victorian Heritage Register but it continued to deteriorate. A concerned local stole the small wooden door that contained Haring’s signature to spare it from further decay. In 2010, Creative Victoria, a state agency that advocates for local creative industries, took over management of the site and an effort to conserve the mural began as part of a plan to make the former school into the new Collingwood Arts Precinct.

Today, the mural looks as fresh as it ever has, restored in 2014 by Antonio Rava, who is now responsible for the same task in Amsterdam. The anonymous door thief—one of the more rewarding interviews in Uncovered—returned the prized possession to its right place knowing that the mural’s fate appears to be in good hands now.

Read the rest

When Banksy has to work from home

"My wife hates it when I work from home," writes Banksy on Instagram.

Read the rest

Invader's "Rubik Mona Lisa," made from hundreds of Rubik's Cubes, expected to get $166,000 at auction

"Rubik Mona Lisa" (2005) by legendary French street artist Invader, is expected to sell for around $166,000 at a forthcoming auction. Made from more than 300 Rubik's Cubes, it's the centerpiece of Artcurial's "Urban Art" sale taking place on February 23. Invader first experimented with what he calls Rubikcubism in 2004 and has since created many other works including iconic videogame characters and representations of classical paintings by Alain Jacquet and Gustave Courbet. Invader writes:

Rubikcubism is similar to Op Art. To view a piece, you have to stand back from it. Close up, the image is nothing but a mass of cubes and colours, it’s only when you stand back that the face emerges. The further away you stand, the clearer it becomes. Two years ago, I displayed a Mona Lisa in the window of a gallery in Lyon. From the gallery entrance, the image was invisible. Overly pixelated. It was only when you stood on the pavement opposite that Mona Lisa’s features appeared. Faces become recognisable or amorphous, depending on the position of the viewer.

Read the rest

Banksy's brilliant new mural commenting on homelessness

Over the weekend, Banksy stenciled a genius new artwork on a wall on Vyse Street in the Jewellery Quarter of Birmingham, UK.

Then last night, someone added red noses to the reindeer.)

Read the rest

Banksy celebrates the erasure of his Brexit mural: "I guess a big white flag says it just as well"

In 2017, Banksy painted a giant mural on a wall in Dover, England depicting a worker chiseling a star off the EU flag, by way of a comment on the Brexit vote; now, parties unknown have painted over that mural, whitewashing it. Banksy is philosophical about this development: "Oh. I had planned that on the day of Brexit I was going to change the piece in Dover to this. But seems they've painted over it. Nevermind. I guess a big white flag says it just as well." (via Naked Capitalism) (Image: Dunk, CC BY) Read the rest

Fun "urban blight" popsicle stick and graffiti art project for kids

Graffiti Diplomacy is a Brooklyn-based graffiti art studio and educational outfit with a terrific Web site containing free lessons, handouts, and craft activities for beginning (and advanced) artists. Their "Urban Blight" diorama how-to, complete with popsicle stick picket fences, looks like a lot of fun to build and tag.

Graffiti Crafting # 1 - Learn How To Make A Popsicle Stick Graffiti Picket Fence

Read the rest

Artist paints playful shadow art on sidewalks

Artist Damon Belanger's "Shadow Art" installations are making the rounds on the internet and for good reason, they're terrific! Using grey paint designed for concrete patios, he first created these street art pieces on commission back in 2016. They're a permanent installation, so you can still find all 22 of the fantastical shadows, ranging from anthropomorphic flowers to critters to abstract designs, on the downtown sidewalks of Redwood City, California.

View this post on Instagram

In use... #redwoodcity #visitredwoodcity #shadowart

A post shared by Damon Belanger (@dmn.belanger) on May 29, 2016 at 9:32pm PDT

View this post on Instagram

#redwoodcity #cityofredwoodcity #publicart #streetart #visitredwoodcity #rwcparks #redwoodcityshadowart #shadowart

A post shared by Damon Belanger (@dmn.belanger) on Jun 8, 2016 at 7:46pm PDT

View this post on Instagram

Dog the Cat. One of about twenty shadow art pieces I painted in downtown #redwoodcity. #rwcparks #visitrwc #redwoodcityshadowart #publicart #shadowart

A post shared by Damon Belanger (@dmn.belanger) on May 21, 2016 at 11:23pm PDT

View this post on Instagram

Robo Band. One of about twenty shadow art pieces I painted in downtown #redwoodcity. #rwcparks #visitrwc #redwoodcityshadowart #publicart #shadowart

A post shared by Damon Belanger (@dmn.belanger) on May 21, 2016 at 11:28pm PDT

View this post on Instagram

Hydrant @ El Camino. One of about twenty shadow art pieces I painted in downtown #redwoodcity. #rwcparks #visitrwc #redwoodcityshadowart #publicart #shadowart

A post shared by Damon Belanger (@dmn.belanger) on May 21, 2016 at 11:33pm PDT

View this post on Instagram

Parking Monkey. One of about twenty shadow art pieces I painted in downtown #redwoodcity.

Read the rest

Banksy's latest street art comments on town's steel industry

This Banksy artwork was painted late last night a on a steelworker's garage in Port Talbot, South Wales, UK. From CNN:

The art, which appears to pay homage to the town's industrial past, depicts a child playing in what looks like snow. But viewed from another angle this appears to be embers and smoke from a skip fire....

Properties and cars were covered with black dust from the town's steelworks in July, which has been suggested as a potential inspiration for the work...

A Neath Port Talbot council spokesperson told CNN in a statement that they are sending officers to liaise with the property owner in order to assist in protecting the artwork but noted that the graffiti is on private property.

View this post on Instagram

. . . . Season’s greetings . . .

A post shared by Banksy (@banksy) on Dec 19, 2018 at 6:53am PST

Read the rest

Street artists leave 'Please Clean Up After Your Democracy' signs to encourage voting

A street art collective known as ArtBitch, currently operating as VoteBitch, has been droplifting humorous pro-voting signs up in a bunch of public Bay Area locations.

Each sign shows a figure holding up a dog poop bag in one hand and a leash attached to the United States in the other, with the word "VOTE" and the hashtag #itactuallymatters underneath it.

The group has made the sign's art a free download on their site.

You pick up your mess – why should the neighbors sit home watching football while you rock the whole civic duty thing? Tell folks to get with the program with this chipper yet irony-laden “Vote” sign.

Vote! It does actually matter.

View this post on Instagram

Please vote! Yes, my 10-year-old is judging. She wishes she could vote for her future! #itactuallymatters #vote #votesaveamerica #democracy #midterms

A post shared by Anita Singha (@aneeter) on Oct 20, 2018 at 7:57pm PDT

View this post on Instagram

Pick it up! Want a free PDF of this? Print your own dang sign by emailing me thru the website (link in profile). #vote #itactuallymatters #streetart #culturejamming #adbusters #art #Election #elections #elections2018 #election2018 #registertovote #register #bluewave #blacklivesmatter #politics #TheFutureIsVoting #BeAVoter #CivicMinded #Civilrights #2018Election #rockthevote #bluewave #rememberinnovember #moveon #democracy #democracynow #leagueofwomenvoters #feminist #feminism #activism

A post shared by VoteBitch (@votebitch2020) on Oct 13, 2018 at 12:27pm PDT

photo by Rusty Blazenhoff (VoteBitch tipped me off on a few of the locations so I could photograph the signs. The lead image was captured at the bus stop on Webster Street near the corner of Atlantic Avenue in Alameda.) Read the rest

Against all evidence, city of Savannah claims googly eyes glued to Revolutionary War statue are "not funny"

An extremely funny prankster glued googly eyes to the statue of Revolutionary War commander Nathaniel Greene; the City of Savannah took to its Facebook page to insist that this was "not funny" but rather "vandalism" and saying that the police had been involved. Read the rest

Graffiti has been a part of military life for at least 5,000 years

War is a thing of terror, traditions, heartache and often, boredom. Passing the time between patrols, and the banality that comes from life in the field, is a constant challenge. Some people read. Most exercise. Everyone complains about the food. Soldiers write, train and call home--if there's someone there that'll pick up the phone. Video games? Totally a thing, in some instances. If you have a Sharpie, or a knife, there's a good chance that you might wind up doodling, scratching or scrawling something, at one point or another, to prove that you were there, where ever ‘there’ might be.

Jonathan Bratt, a veteran of the war in Afghanistan and a current company commander in the National Guard, put together a great read on the history of military graffiti for The New York Times. Starting with 5,000-year old cave paintings and navigating conflicts across the span of history, Bratten touches on the artwork and vandalization that soldiers, living in Death’s shadow, undertook to cure themselves of boredom and, in some cases, serve as proof of their existence.

From the New York Times Magazine:

World War II brought U.S. troops to Europe by the millions, and this time they were accompanied by a friend: Kilroy. Kilroy was a mysterious phantom, asserting his presence in the scrawled phrase “Kilroy was here,” often accompanied by a cartoon doodle of a bald head just peeking over a wall, nose and fingers visible. And Kilroy was everywhere. Troops claimed that when they’d storm a beach or take a village, they’d somehow find that Kilroy had gotten there before them.

Read the rest

ACLU steps in to defend anti-Trump mural in New Orleans

A mural quoting a sexual assault comment made by the President of the United States led to a threat of jail time from the city of New Orleans. Neal Morris, owner of the property and commissioner of the work, got the ACLU involved. Read the rest

Watch this street artist turn trash into enormous color-soaked sculptures

Bordalo II creates massive sculptures from junkyard artifacts. Here, he creates an underwater scene. Read the rest

More posts