Hypnotic video of dropping liquids into an aquarium

Photographer Brian Tomlinson creates beautiful stills of liquids dropped into an aquarium. Some of the results are below: Read the rest

Fantastic avant-garde and counterculture posters for sale

The intrepid counterculture archivists/publishers of Boo-Hooray have posted their "Top 100 Posters" for sale. What a stunning collection of avant-garde art and design. It makes me yearn for the downtown scenes of the prior century.

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Gimmicky technological conceptualism returns with a vengeance

Wow! An edible drone with extruded vegetable spars that can be flown into famine-affected areas! Reworded press release posts popped up everywhere last week with this image attached. Ian Bogost wasn't buying it. Read the rest

Very strange ear earrings

Before artist Nadja Buttendorf gave us "Finger-rings," she created silicone "EARrings" in a variety of skin tones. "Price on request."

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Kickstarting modern hobo coins

Artist Chris Ovdiyenko has created a series of modern hobo nickels based on "some of the most iconic coins," imagining what they would look like if they were overengraved by someone with a delightfully morbid sensibility. Read the rest

Zelda: Art & Artifacts is an enormous art book for Hyrule explorers

The Legend of Zelda: Art & Artifacts is a mammoth book containing art and errata from practically every Zelda title ever released. Having spent a mere afternoon with it, I feel I've experienced an adolescence-worth of missed gameplay.

I've never gotten around to immersing myself in the Zelda games, but was always struck by the their' precision and economy, a world crafted more than built. There's a mysticism, even a darkness to Zelda that seems out of place in Nintendo's cutesy-poo lineup.

A heroic cycle, with a eternally-recurring hero and nemesis, every generation of the mythos is a strange echo of another, and the star is a stoic mute boy defined by his tools and under fate's control. Hyrule and its hero are less standard RPG fantasy than a uniquely Japanese new wave murmur, an Elric in Arcadia who brings sunshine rather than storm and never has a single brooding thought and gets to live silently ever after.

Published by Dark Horse Books, it's 424 pages long and weighs 6 pounds. It's 12.3 x 9.3 inches long and wide and two inches thick. Notes and other documentation are translated by Aria Tanner, Hisashi Kotobuki, Heidl Plechl and Michael Gombos.

Organized roughly by release date (the canonical continuity seems rather murky), there's early animation-style cels, box art, instruction booklets, and even some work from the latest title, Breath of the Wild, released a couple of weeks ago.

It goes from exquisitely painted concept art right down to detailed sprite sheets from classic 8-bit outings, and the print quality is outstanding. Read the rest

Goldfish-driven vehicles reach new heights

Goldfish-driven vehicles continue to make great strides since our previous coverage. Now they are higher up and on a sturdier wheelbase, allowing free movement around any gallery where this iteration resides.

Quentin Destieu and Sylvain Huguet say:

Machine 2 Fish is an artistic installation using a robotic experimental system that translates the movements of a living goldfish into the physical locomotion of a robot. It is a question of allowing a goldfish to move in a terrestrial universe thanks to this prosthesis. The aim is to create a pseudo-intelligent system linking the fish and the machine to a stand-alone device that refers to cyborgs and science fiction. This project was born in 2010 as part of a residency with the support of M2F Créations / Lab GAMERZ, the 2016 version embeds a new system of sensors and computer programming able to respond as closely as possible to the requirements of fish.

When will the BattleBots-style series FishBots start? We're waiting with bated* breath.

Machine 2 Fish (Vimso / Gamerz)

* Yes, the pun is intentional. Read the rest

A confusatorium for self-driving cars

James "New Aesthetics" Bridle (previously) wants to confuse your autonomous vehicle, so he's designed this Autonomous Trap 001, a sequencing scheme with lots of room for growth. Read the rest

Artist Jay Lynch, of Garbage Pail Kids fame, dead at 72

Underground comix cartoonist Jay Lynch, perhaps best known for Bijou Funnies and his contributions to the Garbage Pail Kids trading card series, died March 5, reports the New York Times..

“Underground comix were the most important art movement of the 20th century,” he wrote, using the “comics” spelling preferred by underground cartoonists, in the introduction to “Underground Classics: The Transformation of Comics Into Comix” (2009), by Denis Kitchen and James Danky. “Copies of many of the early books sell to collectors for many thousands of dollars,” he continued. “It’s all quite ironic: Rebellious cartoonists mocking consumer culture were inadvertently producing collectible artifacts for the same consumer culture 40 years down the road.”

And I do believe that's his art on the 30th Anniversary Box set. Alex Balk wrote a commemorative poem and it's perfect. John Pound is still with us. Read the rest

Beautiful collages depict untranslatable words

Lithuanian artist Jolita Vaitkutė created this charming series of images depicting untranslatable words, based on the word's meaning. Read the rest

Artist warps landscapes into Inception-style images

Turkish artist Aydın Büyüktaş recently visited the United States, which inspired him to create the Flatland series of digitally-warped images. Read the rest

Randomly generated pixel art potions

Brian Macintosh made an Icon Machine that generates procedural potions. Gotta drink 'em all! Source code. Read the rest

Illustrator 1000DAY's lovely work inspired by MΛX

Korean illustrator Jang Suk-Woo (aka 1000DAY) was inspired by the music of Max Schneider to create some lovely layered illustrations. Read the rest

Esther Mahlangu's tour teaching Americans to make traditional South African art

Late last year, famed South African artist Esther Mahlangu visited a number of major American cities with a traveling display of her work and hands-on workshops for aspiring artists. It's a great glimpse into her body of work. Read the rest

Makers: enter the Share Festival's ARTMAKER Prize competition for sincere electronic art

An all-star jury composed of Arduino inventor Massimo Canzi, Arthur C Clarke Center director Sheldon Brown, tech artist Motor Comino, activist Jasmina Tesanovic and OG Cyberpunk Bruce Sterling are judging the Artmaker prize for the tenth annual Share Festival: this year's theme is "Sincerity" and the prize goes to "art works with the virtues of lucidity, honesty and clarity. Our theme for 2017 asks for self-evident truth and heartfelt emotion, and scorns all slyness, demagoguery and deceit." Read the rest

Bavarian intelligence agency says Scientologists secretly took over one of the world's top art galleries

Bavaria's Verfassungsschutz -- "Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution" -- says that the Haus der Kunst, one of the world's top contemporary art galleries, was infiltrated by Scientologists who rose through the ranks, illegally discriminated against non-Scientologists when hiring, and waged psychological warfare against staff who were not members of the cult. Read the rest

Ideal Boy, An: Charts from India

Cheap visual charts were the main educational aid in Indian classrooms until recently. Meant to teach children good behavior, and to assist their reading skills, these inexpensive posters were plastered everywhere by local printers. They have a naive art aesthetic since the artists were unschooled themselves. Generally the charts follow a formula of filing in a grid with examples. Like comic books, their garish colors and simple forms have their own innocent charm. This book rounds up a hundred samples of what is now a rare folk art.

Ideal Boy, An: Charts from India by Sirish Rao, V. Geetha, Gita Wolf (Editors) Dewi Lewis Publishing 2001, 120 pages, 6.9 x 1.0 x 9.4 inches, Hardcover $7 Buy on Amazon

See other cool books at Wink. Read the rest

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