Here be dragons: Thrifted Ikea dresser remade with graphite paper and woodburning kit

Lorraine Andrusiak couldn't get a new Ikea Moppe dresser in Canada, but she found this one in a thrift store, marred by a thick, ugly coat of paint; so she stripped the paint, transferred vintage sea-monster art with graphite paper, and burned the decorations into the wood -- the result is gorgeous. Read the rest

Star Wars themed rice paddy art

Americans have corn mazes, and in Japan, the town of Inakadate has rice paddy art. By planting several strains of rice in the same field, they create these colorful images, like this Star Wars scene.

Bonus: the latest Godzilla art.

STAR WARS Inakadate Tambo Art (YouTube / Satoshi.K via) Read the rest

Women Who Draw: directory of freelance illustrators

Women Who Draw is a directory of illustrators interested in accepting work. You can filter by location and minority status. It's well-designed, too, displaying a straightforward example of each artist's style in a lazyloading grid layout.

Women Who Draw is an open directory of female* professional illustrators, artists and cartoonists who take freelance work. It was created by a group of women artists in an effort to increase the visibility of female illustrators, with an emphasis on female illustrators of color, LBTQ+, and other minority groups of female illustrators. We hope this directory will be used by publishers, art directors and editors to find less visible illustrators, and encourage them to work with these illustrators more frequently.

The BBC's Vicky Baker reports on an enduring problem: why do certain high-paying gigs in illustration get consistently assigned to men, when so many top-flight illustrators are women?

Ms MacNaughton and Ms Rothman, who are both successful illustrators, said they were motivated to create the project after noticing certain publications were dominated by male artists.

"We counted a certain magazine that often has illustrated covers, and noticed that in the past 55 covers, only four were by women," said Ms Rothman. Something seemed to be amiss, considering that the arts field within education is often dominated by women.

In the UK, data from higher-education admissions service Ucas shows that in 2016 the number of women enrolled in design studies courses (including illustration) was more than double the number of men.

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Check out these beautiful hand-cut ceramic tiles

Marek Jacisin creates ceramic wall tiles that are painstakingly hand-cut. The cool patterns he ends up with make the effort worthwhile. Read the rest

Ring that resembles an extra finger

Artist Najda Buttendorf cast a replica of her own ring finger, then produced Finger-rings in a series of skintones (she also does extra ears you can wear as earrings and many other whimsical/creepy pieces). (via Neatorama) Read the rest

After Ways of Seeing, watch Robert Hughes' Shock of the New

In the Ways of Seeing post, commenter Frederick_Hagemeiste suggested the 1980 series Shock of the New. The first episode makes a compelling case that engineering had a vast influence on 20th century art. Read the rest

Lovely cast aluminum and brass science fiction sculptures

Scott Nelles is a Wisconsin sculptor who works in cast brass and aluminum, making beautiful, whimsical pieces with a strong science fictional flare tinged with strealined dieselpunk. Read the rest

This robotic arm's cleanup task is bloody endless

The Guggenheim has Sun Yuan & Peng Yu’s installation "Can’t Help Myself" on display through March. The robot arm monitors and attempts to contain a viscous blood-red liquid as it spreads out from the base of the arm, spattering more liquid around its enclosure. Read the rest

John Berger’s Ways of Seeing still resonates

Of all the nice tributes since art critics John Berger's death on January 2, this Dazed piece is a short and sweet summation of how far ahead of his time he was. The second episode of Ways of Seeing is a brisk jog through the ways in which the male gaze manifests, even in women:

A woman must continually watch herself. She is almost continually accompanied by her own image of herself. Whilst she is walking across a room or whilst she is weeping at the death of her father, she can scarcely avoid envisaging herself walking or weeping. From earliest childhood she has been taught and persuaded to survey herself continually. And so she comes to consider the surveyor and the surveyed within her as the two constituent yet always distinct elements of her identity as a woman. She has to survey everything she is and everything she does because how she appears to men, is of crucial importance for what is normally thought of as the success of her life. Her own sense of being in herself is supplanted by a sense of being appreciated as herself by another.... One might simplify this by saying: men act and women appear. Men look at women. Women watch themselves being looked at. This determines not only most relations between men and women but also the relation of women to themselves. The surveyor of woman in herself is male: the surveyed female. Thus she turns herself into an object -- and most particularly an object of vision: a sight.
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Artist ships glass boxes inside FedEx boxes

Walead Beshty created laminated glass boxes the fit exactly inside standard FedEx boxes, then shipped them to varying destinations. The resulting damage and the original box are then paired and displayed, like FedEx® Large Box, LA to NYC, 2007. Read the rest

Blortasia: an abstract art world in the sky

My friend Kevin Mack (who did the Special Effects for Fight Club and many other movies) created a VR art experience called Blortasia for the HTC Vive. Here's a preview.

​Fly freely through a surreal maze of evolving sculptures. Take a break from reality and explore an animated psychedelic sculpture park. Wander through the labyrinth, soar across the open space, or just hang out and let the mesmerizing ever-changing sculptures provide a rejuvenating refuge for your mind. Blortasia combines art and flying in virtual reality.

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Self-defense performance art: Shaun Leonardo's "I Can't Breathe"

Late last year, Shaun Leonardo reprised his art project called "I Can't Breathe." Audience members are paired up and taken through a series of self-defense instructions. It culminates with audience members put in chokeholds by their partners, where they learn that any defensive moves to keep their airways open can be classified as resisting arrest. Read the rest

This Frida Kahlo-themed comic explains the importance of representation

In one simple comic, artist Gavin Aung Than celebrates the power of seeing yourself represented in art:

[via Zen Pencils] Read the rest

Maxime Causeret's gorgeous animation shapes order from chaos

Break out your headphones for this one. Maxime Causeret has created a beautiful animation for Max Cooper's instrumental track "Order from Chaos." Seemingly random elements slowly coalesce into lifelike forms as the track moves from raindrops to increasingly complex sounds. Read the rest

Site helps you draw your own mandalas

ben.akrin.com/mandala is a simple online drawing board with a single purpose: mandalas. Set the axis count, the color and thickness of your pen, and the type of reflection. Then get mandala-making! But I used it to make some vintage lead wallpaper that'll kill you in humid climates. Read the rest

Here's how hand-printed books get those marble-patterned pages

Paper marbling is alive and well at Oberlin College's Letterpress Studio. Alex Fox filmed his friend Jones Pitsker demonstrating a couple of techniques. Read the rest

Short film on Barney Smith’s Toilet Seat Art Museum

San Antonio, Texas has what is probably the world's largest collection of toilet seat art under one roof: Barney Smith’s Toilet Seat Art Museum. Take a couple of minutes to enjoy Wes Plate's profile of a charming old guy's lifelong hobby. Read the rest

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