Miniature kitchen set sawed from a block of wood

Nice and talented people sometimes send stuff to me in the mail. This little kitchen set sawed from a single block of pine is one my favorites. The Mayor of Mt Holly, MN (pop. 4) made it using a pattern from one of the Foxfire books, "updating it with a few things."

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Lecture on zombies, art, and death

Zombie artist George Pfau sends us, "Zombies Identified: A slideshow-lecture performed for BAASICS 5:Monsters, a free event at ODC Theater in San Francisco."

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Artist turns the world into a museum

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Among other pranksterish activities, Artist Miguel Marquez creates works of art simply by adding signage to things that are already there.

Play thousands of 48-hour game jam entries

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The Ludum Dare international game jam is probably the largest event of its kind -- and the longest running, at over 12 years. Three times a year, game developers are challenged to build and share a new game within 48 hours, often documenting their process and making source code available. Each time, the community votes to agree on a theme.

This year's is 'Entire Game On One Screen.' Which sounds simple, like, 'okay, no iPad companion app,' but it's actually a real design challenge -- just think about how many games have menu screens, inventory screens, y'know, different levels, little things like that.

The submission phase is over, and anyone who wants to dive in can play and rate the 2,637 games, with 1,365 in actual competition (here's a cool entry browser if the website itself is overwhelming). It's fun to get involved, not only to learn more about the rapid prototyping process, but to see the seeds of game design's next wave of inspiration. The winner of the competition is always a creator to watch.

There's often a lot of brilliant weirdness -- like this 'hot n cold' maze game led by staring animals. Or this -- what is this? And there's something about this simple but beautifully-drawn dragon game that takes me back to the interactive net art domains I used to visit in the 90s.

Own original art from In Real Life!


Jen Wang, the artist and writer who co-created the New York Times bestselling graphic novel In Real Life with me, is selling off her original art from the book.

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Hand-illuminated edition of The Silmarillion


Benjamin Harff produced a hand-illuminated edition of Tolkien's The Silmarillion (a famously dense set of myths and background for Middle Earth) as a final project at art school; in this interview, he explains his motivation and his process.

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Beautiful steampunk creatures


Igor Verniy creates amazing steampunk animal junkbots from watch parts, car parts and electronic junk (here's his Etsy store); in this Bored Panda interview, he explains his process.

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Hyper-realistic drawings on plywood

Singaporean artist Ivan Hoo uses pastels, colored pencils, and ink to create realistic drawings on cardboard. The cup on the right is the drawing.

Extrapolating the backgrounds of famous art with machine learning


Yarin Gal's "Extrapolated Art" project uses Photomatch to expand the scenes in classic paintings beyond the boundaries of the canvas -- although it's a spookily convincing effect, it doesn't add much to the art (in most cases, anyway). (via Kottke)

The big book of big of psychedelic fantasy posters

There's a new book out about Big O Posters, which grew out of the graphic design vision of Peter Ledeboer, the charismatic art director of the U.K. incarnation of music and counter-culture magazine Oz, published psychedelic, sci-fi, and fantasy posters from 1967 until 1980.

Originally promoted in the pages of Oz to sell readers full-size posters of the artwork they were enjoying in the magazine, the roster of Big O posters included some of the biggest names in rock art, from Martin Sharp (a pair of album covers for Cream) and Mati Klarwein (Santana’s “Abraxas”) to H.R. Giger (Emerson, Lake & Palmer’s “Brain Salad Surgery”) and Roger Dean (multiple covers for Yes). It’s a big, image-packed tale, which is why The Art of Big O, designed and published by Michael Fishel and written by Nigel Suckling, both of whom were Big O artists, feels so right. It, too, is big and image-packed, capturing both the atmosphere of the London graphic-design world of the 1960s and ’70s as well as the work itself, which is jammed into every nook and cranny of the hefty tome like so many posters tacked to the walls and ceiling of a teenager’s bedroom. The result is less a nostalgic trip down memory lane than a paean to the obsessives who produced and printed this often unapologetically obsessive art.

See sample pages from The Art of Big O on Wink

Incredible embroidered portraits

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Cayce Zavaglia hand-embroiders astonishingly hyperrealistic portraits from cotton and silk thread and crewel embroidery wool.

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Documentary about former Ren & Stimpy artist, William Wray

I'm a longtime admirer of painter William Wray, who I first learned about from his great art in Ren & Stimpy. In recent years Wray has focused on fine art, and Loic Zimmermann's documentary about Wray is a work of art itself.

After his first encounter with William Wray during an art opening in Los Angeles in May 2013, French visual artist Loic Zimmermann felt the need to follow the California based painter and document his artistic process. This inspiring year long journey of an uncompromising artist, takes us from historical downtown LA to the abandoned towns of Salton-Sea and back to the Artists light filled loft in the LA foothills. The filmmaker explores the artists connections with the superhero impersonators he's portraying for his recent series "Fortress of Delusion" as well as technique he uses to achieve his masterful paintings. It is a film that captures the moments of an Artists thoughts, his motivations, and his understanding of the mechanics behind the bridge between representational and abstract imagery within the painted canvas. It is a moving document of a great american painter.

Gorgeous (unofficial) Star Wars Ep. VII posters by Phil Noto

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Two beautiful posters for the forthcoming Star Wars movie by artist and illustrator Phil Noto: Color, Black and White. “I got so excited after watching the trailer, I had to do some art,” says Phil. “Felt like 6 y.o. me drawing Luke Skywalker after seeing Ep. 4.”

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[HT: Laughing Squid]

Artist controls water "with mind"—and the help of an EEG

In Eunoia II, Lisa Park hooks herself up to Mindlink/Neurosky-type miniature EEG equipment and uses it to manipulate a beautiful and mysterious arrangement of water bowls. [via]

This is a painted wood sculpture

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Amazing carved and painted wood sculptures from artist Tom Eckert.

My sculptures are formed entirely of wood and then painted. I use traditional processes to carve, construct, laminate and paint my pieces. The woods I prefer working with are basswood, linden and limewood (all very similar) chosen because they carve and paint well and are very stable. Coming from a painting and drawing background, I am still interested in applying some of those techniques to my sculptures... “Cloth” carved of wood has much different structural qualities than real cloth. When this idea is applied to my compositions (floating book, floating cards, floating rock) a sense of the impossible happens - for me, magic.

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