Science fiction vintage Japanese matchbox art mashup prints

Etsy seller Chet Phillips sells his amazing science-fiction/vintage Japanese matchbox art remixes as 5"x7" signed prints with mats and backing boards at $12 each. (via Kadrey) Read the rest

Wonderfully clever graffiti that interacts with the structures where it's painted

Fantastic work from Italian street art collective Collettivo FX.

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Artist makes delightful creatures from beach rocks

Stefano Furlani lives near the beach, and as a father-son project he started collecting rocks for collages. The results are pretty neat! Read the rest

Fantastic vintage Japanese matchbox art

See more at Juxtapoz!

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Vinyl Divas: vintage opera diva album art is weird and wonderful

Vinyl Divas is a comprehensive collection of vintage classical music divas, and it ranges from the sublime to the ridiculous to the sublimely ridiculous. Includes lists by artist name, collection based on themes, and even vanity albums by self-published divas. The fashion, the makeup, the styles, the taste both good and bad... prepare to go down a rabbit hole of 20th century nostalgia. Read the rest

Elaborately-detailed sculptures made from stacked sheets of laser-cut paper

Strictly Paper blogs the work of Eric Standley, who uses lasers on hundreds of sheets of paper to create incredibly-detailed works of art. [via]

These laser-cut masterpieces, reminiscent of stained glass windows, are inspired by geometry found in Gothic and Islamic architectural ornamentation in an attempt to capture a reverence for the infinite. “I am interested in the conceptual migration from the permanence and massiveness of stone to the fragility and intimacy of paper,” he mentions in an artist statement.

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Madeline Gannon's Mimus examines robot-human interdependence

The Design Museum in London just unveiled Mimus, Madeline Gannon's newest exploration of robot-human interdependence. From its enclosure, Mimus senses visitors and interacts with them. Read the rest

Intricate mandalas created by Volt Agapeyev

"Nature is transgression's church," says Vitaliy Volt" Agapeyev, who combines geometric forms with intricate patterns found in nature. Read the rest

Watch Warhol eat a Whopper

Andy Warhol eats a Whopper, from Jørgen Leth's 1982 documentary/art film "66 Scenes from America," a collection of moving "postcards" from the United States.

According to YouTube user Hidden Below, who posted this clip, Warhol eating the burger is "a classic ASMR trigger scene, so if you got ASMR you might wanna bookmark this video for a good time."

Noted.

(via Weird Universe)

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Watch a master glassblower make an intricate dragon

In under an hour, glass artist James Mongrain transforms blobs of molten glass into a stunning green dragon. The choreographed teamwork, the variety of tools, and the interesting narration make this a real treat. Read the rest

A more advanced fidget gadget from Chris Bathgate

Sculptor-machinist Chris Bathgate has improved on his Slider "worry-stone" gadget for occupying your nervous hands, using techniques he learned through his collaboration with spinning top-maker Richard Stadler. Read the rest

Street photographer's fantastic series of "then and now" photos

Peterborough, England photographer Chris Porsz's Reunions photo series and book presents his remarkable street snapshots of myriad characters taken in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s juxtapozed with those same individuals at the location of the original photographs. See more: Reunions

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New show of Scott Albrecht's exquisite deconstructed typographical art opening in L.A.

My friend Scott Albrecht, a Brooklyn-based artist and designer who creates fantastic typographical illustrations and hand-crafted, puzzle-like wood sculptures, has a show of remarkable new works opening on Saturday (11/19) at Shepard Fairey's Subliminal Projects gallery in Los Angeles.

"(Scott's) abstraction and deconstruction of type forms combined with his sophisticated color theory and surface treatments yield artworks that are immediate, yet command a deeper and closer look," Shepard says.

The exhibition, titled "New Translations," runs until January 7. Below is a preview of the show. Valley Cruise Press has also published a hardcover, full color book of Scott's work, available here. From the gallery:

The works are largely based in typography but have their legibility masked in a variety of techniques; bold color-blocking, varying depths, non-uniform grids, or a lack of spacing between words. This manipulation can make the work appear pattern-based at first glance; however, on further evaluation the viewer discovers there is no repetition. While his works are constructed from a literary idea, Albrecht's approach is mainly visual. In a series of new pieces for the exhibit, this process is underscored when he overlays two words on top of one another, and in some instances reverses the order of the characters. The end result renders the characters illegible with the exception of small moments or clues from the two words, visually presenting two ideas that are at odds with each other, hindering any idea from manifesting.

Albrecht's woodworks are the result of an extensive process that starts with a hand-rendered drawing and requires hours of precision production work.

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Donald Duck in Mathmagic Land

In 1959 Disney released a 30-minute educational featurette called "Donald in Mathmagic Land." Everything about it is superb - the design, the animation, the music, the narration, and the presentation of the material. I remember watching this in school and realizing how interesting math could be.

From Wikipedia:

Donald in Mathmagic Land is a 27-minute Donald Duck educational featurette released on June 26, 1959.It was directed by Hamilton Luske. Contributors included Disney artists John Hench and Art Riley, voice talent Paul Frees, and scientific expert Heinz Haber, who had worked on the Disney space shows. It was released on a bill with Darby O'Gill and the Little People. In 1959, it was nominated for an Academy Award (Best Documentary - Short Subjects). In 1961, two years after its release, it was shown as part of the first program of Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color with an introduction by Ludwig Von Drake. The film was made available to schools and became one of the most popular educational films ever made by Disney. As Walt Disney explained, "The cartoon is a good medium to stimulate interest. We have recently explained mathematics in a film and in that way excited public interest in this very important subject."

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Amazing animated GIF of a skull drawing

The artist Sangoma writes, "Anamorphic drawing- for anyone curious about the style. This piece is a combination of graphite, pan pastel, charcoal, and exacto knife (to trim the top of the page)."

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How to draw your hand in 3D

I know what my kids will be doing after school today. (Handimania)

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New book of Mitch O'Connell tattoos

Artist extraordinaire Mitch O'Connell has a new book out, called Tattoos Volume Two: 251 Designs, Bigger and Better! Mitch and I've known each other since we were both 16 years old at Boulder High School. (He was in marching band. Here's his photo.) He was a terrific artist then and I hated him for it. Decades later, my hate has mellowed to mere jealously and bitterness.

You can get a copy on Amazon, or buy a signed/inscribed copy direct from the Mitch (with extra surprises).

Here is how I remember Mitch:

And here is Mitch's drawing of his studio in the late 1970s early 1980s.

Previously:

Dirty Needle tattoo art show opens tonight in Detroit

Temporary zombie tattoos by Mitch O'Connell

Mitch O'Connell at Tattoo Factory in Chicago

Gweek podcast 129: Bondage Britney!

Gweek 082: Mitch O'Connell, the World's Best Artist

Mitch O'Connell the World's Best Artist by Mitch O'Connell - exclusive preview of his new art book Read the rest

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