Gallery: Outside the Lines Too, more adult coloring brilliance


Souris "Hustler of Culture" Hong has followed up on her amazing 2013 coloring book Outside the Lines with a second edition: Outside the Lines Too. Read the rest

OZ: page designs from the most beautiful psychedelic 'zine ever


Dig these covers and spreads from OZ, the psychedelic magazine launched in Australia in 1963 and reborn in the UK in 1967 under the visionary editorship of Richard Neville, Martin Sharp, and Richard Walsh. Far fucking out. From Wikipedia:

The original Australian OZ took the form of a satirical magazine published between 1963 and 1969, while the British incarnation was a "psychedelic hippy" magazine which appeared from 1967 to 1973. Strongly identified as part of the underground press, it was the subject of two celebrated obscenity trials, one in Australia in 1964 and the other in the United Kingdom in 1971. On both occasions the magazine's editors were acquitted on appeal after initially being found guilty and sentenced to harsh jail terms. An earlier, 1963 obscenity charge was dealt with expeditiously when, upon the advice of a solicitor, the three editors pleaded guilty...

Several editions of Oz included dazzling psychedelic wrap-around or pull-out posters by Sharp, London design duo Hapshash and the Coloured Coat and others; these instantly became sought-after collectors' items and now command high prices. Another innovation was the cover of Oz No.11, which included a collection of detachable adhesive labels, printed in either red, yellow or green. The all-graphic "Magic Theatre" edition (OZ No.16, November 1968), overseen by Sharp and (filmmaker Philippe) Mora, has been described by British author Jonathon Green as "arguably the greatest achievement of the entire British underground press."

More at Stoned Immaculate Vintage: "Return To Oz" (via Jux)

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The future of photography, education, sharing, news, privacy and learning (seriously)


Jonathan Worth is a celebrated, successful, internationally recognized award-winning photographer who saw the writing on the wall for his business -- selling pictures to magazines -- when he found himself threatening a young girl for pirating his pictures, and decided there had to be a better way. Read the rest

Statue punishes people who give it eye contact

Norwegian artist Erik Pirolt sculpture, “No Eye Contact Allowed,” is on exhibit in Kristiansand, Norway. It is a human bust in a glass enclosure. A small sign on art instructs visitors not to look into the eyes of the sculpture. If they do so anyway, they get surprised by a gusher of water that comes out of the bust's eyes and splashes against the glass.

[via] Read the rest

The shape of the Internet (according to patent drawings)


The stylized art of patent drawings is instantly recognizable. Before the information age, the drawings were drafter's jewelboxes, designed to make the workings of new mechanical inventions legible to other inventors (and patent examiners). Read the rest

Ultra-thin USB powered light box


A light box is an excellent tool for illustrators. It allows you to place a sheet of paper with a sketch on it, then place another piece of paper on top of it, and trace the original drawing. A lot of artists do a pencil sketch on a sheet of paper, then use a nicer piece of paper to trace the sketch in ink.

Andreas Ekberg, a wonderful illustrator who makes beautiful stenciled skateboards (like this Jackhammer Jill deck) and other things, told me about this USB light board. I already have a light board, and I've used it for over 30 years. It's a clunky metal box with fluorescent tubes and I used it draw illustrations for the early issues of the bOING bOING zine.

If I didn't already have my lightbox, I would snap up this 5mm-thick USB powered light box ($45 on Amazon). It looks so much better than my old-school light box. The brightness level is adjustable, the LEDs will last much longer than the bulbs (mine currently has one burnt out bulb and I've been using it that way for years), and best of all, it is much more portable. If I get back into hand drawing in a big way, I'll get one. Read the rest

Photos of sweet treats carefully arranged into pyramids and abysses


Photographer Sam Kaplan organized candy, cookies, sandwiches, and other tasty snacks into astounding architectural forms and wondrous wormholes of food. The series is titled "Pits & Pyramids." (via Laughing Squid)

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Censoring Santa Barbara politician thwarted, painting restored


Peter from the National Coalition Against Censorship writes, "A California official removed an artwork by skateboarding icon Scott Olson from a public building because he said it was 'obscene.' Sorry, the First Amendment exists to prevent this kind of thing. Read the rest

Han Solo in Carbonite Pop Tarts


Pop-Art: Frosted Han Solo is (was) a sold-out/limited-edition vinyl sculpture from Falcon Toys. Fun idea -- hope they do another run!

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Startling animated MRIs of fruits and vegetables

Andy Ellison, an MRI technologist at Boston University Medical School, put fruits and vegetables through the medical scanner and created these remarkable GIFs. Above, tomato. Below, jackfruit, corn, and onion. See many more at Andy's blog: Inside Insides

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Stunning oil paintings of astronauts and rockets


Brooklyn-based artist Michael Kagan creates oil paintings of astronauts and other space-themed subjects. They are indeed out of this world. Read the rest

Everything is a Remix: the remastered fifth anniversary edition

Kirby Ferguson writes, "Everything is a Remix has been polished, merged and rereleased for its fifth anniversary." Read the rest

Look at how this artist turns a dumb "doodle pad" into amazing illustrations


Several years ago, artist David Jablow came across a doodle pad printed with a partially completed drawing of a naked woman. It looks like this:

He proceeded to create wonderfully creative illustrations that put the woman in a number of exciting scenarios. I've posted David's work in 2014 and 2013. I also bought his Do It Yourself Doodler Book from his Etsy store. David just posted a new batch of doodles. Check them out on his website. Here are a few samples:

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Younger Bill Gates poses with older Bill Gates


Fulvio Obregon, an illustrator from Cali, Colombia, created a series of portraits that show younger and older versions of the same celebrity as if they are in the same room together.

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17th century illustrations of butterflies


They're the work of Maria Sibylla Merian, a scientist and artist whose meticulous illustrations of wildlife were mostly forgotten until a late 20th century reappraisal.

Hyperallergic's Allison Meier writes on an authority—and master artist—whose recognition was long in coming:

…to Merian “the metamorphosis of the butterfly, which emerges from a lifeless hull and joyfully flies heavenward, is a hope-giving symbol for the resurrection of the soul from the dead physical shell of the Christian’s body.” Yet by the time she published the 1705 Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensum on her research in Suriname, where long-haired caterpillars in the rainforest sometimes swelled her hands up with poison for days and she had to cultivate exotic plants herself to keep caterpillars alive through their life-cycles, there’s no mention of God. Rather, she starts by confidently describing her own life and personal journey, concluding that she has “kept simply to my observations.”

Despite her long career, her influence on contemporary natural knowledge, her vivid descriptions of distant Suriname, and her intrepid spirit, when she died in 1717 the city of Amsterdam’s register of deaths described her simply as a woman “without means.”

[via Metafilter] Read the rest

Wonderful alphabet of superhero letters


Australia-based illustrator Simon Koay reimagined the letters of the English alphabet as superheroes. Read the rest

Mid-Century Misery: the discontented delights of Stevan Dohanos

Dohanos was a prolific American painter and illustrator with over 125 Saturday Evening Post covers to his credit. Read the rest

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