Starling murmurations as you've never heard before

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Starlings in flight are always beautiful, but what's most remarkable about The Art of Flying, a film by Jan van IJken about a massive flock of starlings, is the sound. Read the rest

Watch ultrasensitive microphones barely register owls flying

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This remarkable demonstration of a pigeon, a falcon, and an owl flying past six extremely sensitive high-end microphones shows just how quiet owls are when they fly. Read the rest

VIDEO: Tension mounts as man tries to halt progress of pigeon

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We interrupt your growing anxiety at America's emergent cyberpunk dystopia for a tense missive from this guy's house. In this video, a pigeon bears down a chimney in Romford or maybe Cheltenham or somewhere like that. The perspective on the video makes it hard to tell (especially when things get hairy) but the pigeon is well-armored and only seconds from putting the defender in serious trouble. Wings flap menacingly; a feather sails past the lens. It is not long before he is quite alarmed at the bird's progress. What happens next, though, will probably not surprise you. Read the rest

Baby emu excited to play with puppy

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From YouTube description:

Sue's pet emu, Emee, was a lone hatch and has a purpose built pen at the end of the room for when her owner isn't home. The rest of the time though, she is treated as one of the family! This video shows her and a very welcoming pet dog named Molly playing together.

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Cockatoo solves puzzle box

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According to this bird's human companion, Monty has not played with this complicated puzzle in over a year. He seems to know what he's doing. I'm impressed at how well he removed the nut from the bolt. Read the rest

Bird songs visualized as gorgeous mandalas

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Design student Sugko at Sejong University used a CymaScope to visualize bird songs, with beautiful results. Read the rest

Pigeons can distinguish real words from fake non-words

From the study.

We know that pigeons are capable of becoming crafty drug smugglers or connoisseurs of fine art, but now we know they can kind of tell when we're making up words.

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It's raining diseased birds in Boston

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47 grackles fell from the heavens on the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston this weekend, with at least 32 dead. Two cats who ate the remains also ran out of lives.

City officials have sent the dead grackles, which are a type of songbird that travels in flocks, to Tufts University to help determine the cause of death. It is currently unclear whether the birds perished due to a virus, some sort of environmental pollution or intentional poisoning. Test results are expected next week.

“We don’t know what is going on,” John Meaney of the city of Boston’s Inspectional Services told NECN. “So we are investigating all avenues.”

Local resident Willien Pugh told the Boston Herald that his cat Sally B was found dying on the back porch as deceased birds fell from the sky.

“We took the cat from outside and we thought it was a girl so we named it Sally – then when we took it to the vet, we found out it was a boy, so we started calling her Sally B,” Pugh said. “Real good cat.”

47 Grackles is my new mid-2000s-style productivity blog-cum-punk band. [Photo: MDF] Read the rest

Wild birds show interest in their reflection

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Are they happy, mad, or experiencing an emotion that's utterly alien to us? Read the rest

Birds and other animals painted on feathers

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Krystle Missildine paints delicate animal portraits on feathers, like this robin on a macaw feather.

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This dinosaur-like bird enjoys kicking snakes

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The secretary bird looks and moves like I'd imagine a dinosaur looked and moved. Here is one giving a rubber snake the business.

From Reuters: "Scientists are studying the snake-hunting ability of the secretary bird from sub-Saharan Africa, which can kick a snake to death with a force five times its own body weight." Read the rest

Beautiful Birds – Fly from A to Z with dozens of feathered friends

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See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Beautiful Birds by Jean Roussen (author) and Emmanuel Walker (illustrator) Flying Eye Books 2015, 56 pages, 8.9 x 12.2 x 0.4 inches $17 Buy a copy on Amazon

In Beautiful Birds, author Jean Roussen and illustrator Emmanuel Walker fly through the alphabet with dozens of feathered friends. It begins, of course, with “A is for albatross, the admiral of the skies,” and progresses all the way to “Z is for zos-ter-o-pi-dae…” with details about all kinds of avians in between. The writing brims with clever rhymes and colorful words (ogling orbs, polychrome quills) making it delightful to read out loud. If I had to guess, I’d say Roussen is a fan of E.B. White’s idea that “children are game for anything... They love words that give them a hard time, provided they are in a context that absorbs their attention.”

Walker’s vibrant illustrations give kids all the context they need. His graphic, full-bleed drawings feel like those of mid-century masters Saul Bass and Charlie Harper. As an added bonus, the book’s design is also gorgeous. It’s bound in a neon salmon linen, with patterned endpapers to match. The neon color can be found on almost every page in varying doses, giving the optical effect of spying a ruffle of feathers in the wild. – Sara Distin at Tinybob Read the rest

WATCH: Robin hatchling under my deck

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A robin made its nest under our deck, giving us a wonderful birds' eye view of the nest through the boards. Today we noticed one of her three eggs had hatched! Here is footage of the new level 1 robin that emerged.

UPDATE: Wednesday, May 11. Then there were three! Video by Heather.

UPDATE:May 20. They grow up so fast. (Photo: Heather)

UPDATE:May 25. Look at these handsome young boids. Read the rest

Glorious bird photos that won the 2016 Audubon Society Photography Awards

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Bonnie Block won the grand prize in the 2016 Audubon Society Photography Awards for her magnificent photo above of a Bald Eagle and a Great Blue Heron in Seabeck, Washington. The two predators are known to fight over prey, with the Eagles usually winning.

Below, an intense photo that the contest's "youth winner," Carolina Anne Fraser, snapped of Great Frigatebirds in the Galápagos.

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Sea gull picks a fight with itself

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See video of the bellicose bird bullying itself here. Read the rest

Feathers – A sublime meditation on the brilliance of the bird feather. Released today!

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See sample pages from this book at Wink.

We live in a world of backgrounded miracles, entire worlds of wonder and beauty that we either can’t see or stopped noticing a long time ago. Look closely at the wings of a fly on your window sill, stare into a bisected piece of fruit, or look carefully at a growth of mold on a dish. Millions of such micro worlds surround us, breathtaking examples of design, engineering, and evolutionary artistry. When we bother to look.

Feathers is a photographic examination of one such overlooked natural wonder, the lowly bird feather. A single bird has thousands of feathers, of different types, and there are some ten-thousand species of birds. Feathers takes a broad view of the evolution of the bird and its feathers while focusing its lens on the plumage of 75 or so notable species. Each species gets a few pages, with one or two impressively photographed feather close-ups and a brief explanatory text.

This book reminded me a lot of Rose Lynn Fisher’s BEE (which I loved). Both books are minimal in content and feel, but that only helps to narrow and maintain your focus on the world under examination. The text in Feathers doesn’t try to tell you everything about the species of the bird and feather that you’re looking at, but the bits of fascinating science it does contain are probably far more memorable. Like BEE, I felt like I got to peer into a world I don’t normally see and came away greatly enriched by the experience. Read the rest

Watch these cute Barn Owls learn how to fly for the first time

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“Luna and Lily have grown from helpless little chicks to near adult barn owls and now they're beginning to learn how to fly.”

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