Texas Chain Saw Massacre, 40 years old and newly restored

Leatherface

On its 40th anniversary, iconic splatterpunk film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre has been restored with a new 4K transfer from the original 16mm film shot by director Tobe Hooper in 1974. A production of Dark Sky Films, the new print premieres at SXSW on Monday, March 10 with wide theatrical release over the summer.

"I haven't seen The Texas Chain Saw Massacre on the big screen for many, many years," Hooper says. "This 40th anniversary restoration is absolutely the best the film has ever looked. The color and clarity is spectacular, displaying visual details in the film that were never before perceptible. The newly remastered 7.1 soundtrack breathes new life and energy into the film. I am very much looking forward to audiences experiencing this film as they never have before".

Leatherface had no comment.

The Godfather locations, then and now

12104132545 9a628d2785 o

Untitled

Scouting New York visited the New York filming locations of The Godfather (1972) to see how they look today. Top, Don Corleone gunned down outside Genco (128 Mott Street), and that location now. "The New York Filming Locations of The Godfather, Then and Now" (via Laughing Squid)

Happy Birthday, ‘Dr. Strangelove’

"Fifty years ago today, on January 29th, 1964, Stanley Kubrick’s film Doctor Strangelove or: How I Learned t to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb was released," write our friends at Dangerous Minds.

SF tomorrow: "Experimental Films for Kids"

Tomorrow (Saturday 1/25), San Francisco's Exploratorium is hosting an "Experimental Films for Kids" program. Films to be screened include Hans Richter's Ghosts Before Breakfast (1928), Jodie Mack's Rad Plaid (2010), and Stan Brackhage's Mothlight (1963), seen above, which the director made sans camera by collaging moth wings, flowers, and grass between strips of film splicing tape . Start 'em young! "Exploratorium: Saturday Cinema: Experimental Films for Kids" (Thanks, Kelly Sparks!)

David Lynch interviewed by Mike Figgis

Mike Figgis, director of films like Leaving Las Vegas, Hotel, and Suspension of Disbelief interviewed David Lynch, director of films like Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, and Inland Empire.

"I interviewed David in Lodz, Poland at the cinematography festival in about 2008 after the premiere of INLAND EMPIRE," Figgis says. "This clip went onto the DVD of that film. I shot it and edited it immediately, screened it at the festival, much to the chagrin of the guys from KODAK who seemed pissed off at David's comments about film versus digital."

I was entranced watching Lynch's hands as he spoke.

"David Lynch interviewed by Mike Figgis"

Mike Vraney, founder of Something Weird Video, RIP

Vraney2

Swv front page graphic 1k wide

Mike Vraney, founder of Something Weird Video, has died of lung cancer. He was 56. For decades, Something Weird has been the preeminent source of cult psychotronic and exploitation films that would have vanished into the dustbin of underground culture were it not for Vraney's tireless efforts. Our thoughts go out to Mike's wife, artist Lisa Petrucci, their family, co-workers, and friends. Below, watch a 2007 television profile of Vraney and Something Weird. Here's the obituary at Daily Grindhouse, copied from the Something Weird page on Facebook:

"In Memory of 'Something Weird' Founder Mike Vraney (1957-2014)" (Thanks, Kirsten Anderson)

Michael Stipe sings Lou Reed's Pale Blue Eyes (1983)

In 1983, fine art photographer Laura Levine shot a Super-8 film in Athens, Georgia with a group of creative friends. It includes a clip of Michael Stipe singing Lou Reed's "Pale Blue Eyes." The film, titled "Just Like A Movie," is unreleased, but after Reed's tragic death last week, Levine decided to post that scene on YouTube. Levine says, "The song itself was recorded earlier that day on a Walkman, with Matthew Sweet on guitar."

Deliverance's inbred banjo boy

Reddennnn

The dueling banjo scene in John Boorman's Deliverance (1972) is one of my favorite musical moments ever in a film. It's simultaneously delightful, funny, and deeply creepy. I watched the clip recently and decided to find out who played Lonnie, the young inbred fellow picking opposite Ronny Cox. The actor is Billy Redden from Rabun County, Georgia who was 15-years-old at the time. Redden was "discovered" during a casting call at his school in Clayton, Georgia. Special effect makeup was used to augment Redden's already-unusual features. He didn't actually play the banjo. According to The New Yorker, "Boorman had had to deploy another boy to hide behind the swing and slip his hand through Redden’s sleeve to finger the changes." Redden wasn't a fan of Burt Reynolds: “Burt didn’t want to say nothing to nobody,” Redden told The New Yorker years later. “He wasn’t polite. And he made us look real bad--he said on television that all people in Rabun County do is watch cars go by and spit.”

Redden's IMD profile says that for a time Redden gave "Deliverance Tours" along the Georgia river where the film was shot. After Deliverance, Redden didn't appear in another movie until Tim Burton's Big Fish. Burton located Redden working in the Cookie Jar Cafe in Clayton, Georgia. Since then, Redden had a bit part on Blue Collar TV as an inbred car mechanic who played the banjo.

Below, a video interview with Redden from last year.

Read the rest

Janie Geiser's "Ghost Algebra (bird in tree)," dreamlike cut-up film

"Ghost Algebra (bird in tree)" (2009) is Janie Geiser's beautiful, weird, dreamlike 16mm film/animation created from found objects, vintage book illustrations, toys, and collaged ephemera. (via Toys and Techniques)

Tuesday: free NYC screening of artist Invader's film, ART4SPACE

Last year, Parisian street artist Invader, famed for his ubiquitous 8-bit video game mosaics, launched one of his invaders into the stratosphere on a weather balloon. On Tuesday (10/29), our pals at NYC's Jonathan LeVine Gallery are presenting a free screening of the short film about that project, titled ART4SPACE. The screenings are at 8pm and 9pm at Landmark Theatres Sunshine Cinema on East Houston Street. ART4SPACE screening

Documentary about Quidditch

BB contributor Ben Marks tells us of a new documentary film in production about UCLA's Quidditch team that Ben's son founded in 2009:

In May of 2011, when filmmaker Farzad Nikbakht Sangari was relatively early in his career as an M.F.A. candidate at UCLA's School of Theater, Film and Television, he noticed a co-ed group of students on the university’s Intramural field, running around with short brooms between their legs. Hurling underinflated volley balls and dodge balls at each other, as well as through hula hoops on opposite ends of the field, it turned out they were playing Quidditch, the fictional game made famous in the Harry Potter books and movies.

Read the rest

Crazy quick cut faces video for The Paper Kites' "Young"

Oh Yeah Wow's video for The Paper Kites' "Young." Seven days to photograph more than 350 people. Ten days to cut together 4,000+ photos.

The story of Forbidden Planet's soundtrack

NewImage

The soundtrack to Forbidden Planet (1956) was a milestone moment in the history of electronic music. It was the first entirely electronic film score, composed by Louis and Bebe Barron using DIY circuitry inspired in part by Norbert Wiener's 1948 book Cybernetics: Or, Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, a seminal text in its own right. At the time that the film's producer at MGM, Dore Schary, met the Barrons they were beatnik musicians hanging out in Greenwich Village. The soundtrack to Forbidden Planet continues to astonish even today. (Listen to the "Main Title" at left.) My friend Ken Hollings, author of the fantastic outré history book "Welcome to Mars," created a wonderful audio documentary that just aired on BBC Radio 3 about the Barrons and their iconic "electronic tonalities."

You can listen to the BBC Radio 3 piece here: "Sound of Cinema: Return of the Monster from the Id"

And you buy the soundtrack here: "Forbidden Planet: Original MGM Soundtrack

The suits of James Bond

Leisure Safari Jacket 1024x519 Who goes hang gliding in a leisure suit? Bond. James Bond. Graphic designer Matt Spaiser's blog "The Suits of James Bond" should be an inspiration to all of us. Nobody in Hollywood wore terrycloth or linen better than 007.

Visitors, from Koyaanisqatsi-director Godfrey Reggio

More than three decades after Koyaanisqatsi, director Godfrey Reggio has created Visitors, another wordless collaboration with Philip Glass and Jon Kane. It will premiere next month at the Toronto International Film Festival, accompanied by the Toronto Symphony Orchestra.

"Presented by Steven Soderbergh in stunning black and white 4K digital projection, "Visitors" reveals humanity's trancelike relationship with technology, which, when commandeered by extreme emotional states, produces massive effects far beyond the human species. The film is visceral, offering the audience an experience beyond information about the moment in which we live. Comprised of only seventy-four shots, "Visitors" takes viewers on a journey to the moon and back to confront them with themselves."