Paul Verhoeven on media's normalization of fascism

LJ Frezza takes a loving look back at how Robocop, Total Recall, and Starship Troopers are wry commentaries on mass media's normalizing effect on sexism, militarism, climate change, corporatism, and state-sponsored terrorism. Read the rest

Quantifying truthfulness in films "based on a true story"

With awards season upon us, lots of films "based on a true story" are in contention. It gives films a little emotional boost to say it really happened, but how much of the film is true? David McCandless created a metric to quantify it based on scene-by-scene analysts. So Selma hets a 100%, and The Imitation game gets 41.4%. Read the rest

Are these the five best end credits of all time?

CineFix makes their arbitrary choice of the best movie end credits in five different styles. Along the way, it's a pretty good survey of the history and styles of end credits. Lots of honorable mentions, though a few good ones inevitably got left out. Read the rest

Will malfunction or incompetence start World War Three?

Eric Schlosser's book and film Command and Control look at the terrifying prospects of nuclear friendly fire, where one of America's nukes detonates on US soil. It also looks at what might happen if a false alarm gets relayed to a trigger-happy general or President. He starts this New Yorker piece with a terrifying story from June 3, 1980:

President Jimmy Carter’s national-security adviser, Zbigniew Brzezinski, was asleep in Washington, D.C., when the phone rang. His military aide, General William Odom, was calling to inform him that two hundred and twenty missiles launched from Soviet submarines were heading toward the United States. Brzezinski told Odom to get confirmation of the attack. A retaliatory strike would have to be ordered quickly; Washington might be destroyed within minutes. Odom called back and offered a correction: twenty-two hundred Soviet missiles had been launched. Brzezinski decided not to wake up his wife, preferring that she die in her sleep. As he prepared to call Carter and recommend an American counterattack, the phone rang for a third time. Odom apologized—it was a false alarm. An investigation later found that a defective computer chip in a communications device at norad headquarters had generated the erroneous warning. The chip cost forty-six cents.

Lots more scary info at the Command and Control film website.

World War Three, by mistake (New Yorker)

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Watch Carrie Fisher roast George Lucas

Carrie Fisher kills it at the American Film Institute's 2005 Life Achievement Award honoring George Lucas.

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Here's your chance to play a dog in Wes Anderson's next film

Wes Anderson is raffling a chance to make dog sounds for his upcoming film Isle of Dogs, among other cool prizes. Proceeds benefit the non-profit Film Foundation, which has restored nearly 700 films. Read the rest

Are you really the universe itself? Alan Watts set to film clips

Many Alan Watts fans try to help others connect with his ideas by layering them with images and music. This worthy entry by David Lindberg examines the nature of the self and our relationship to the universe, set to a number of recent philosophically-minded films. Read the rest

Watch The Procedure, a NSFW 2016 Sundance short film winner

"The Procedure: A Parking Lot Kidnapping with Unexpected Consequences" is indeed unexpected. Note: you won't be able to unsee one of the more unexpected aspects of the kidnapping. Read the rest

Hilarious film re-enacts one year of sleep-talking

Friends and loved ones told Adam Rosenberg he talked in his sleep. They were right.

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Lovely short film “Hot Mess” celebrates female friendships

Hazel Hayes is an Irish YouTuber and filmmaker, and she recently uploaded this sitcom excerpt called “Hot Mess” on her YouTube channel. Read the rest

Compare the short film 'Whiplash' to the feature 'Whiplash', shot by shot

Jacob T. Swinney compares the short film "Whiplash" with the feature it became.

It's an interesting study in the shot-for-shot remake. With the exception of the location and the switch to Miles Teller as Andrew, nearly everything else is the same.

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Here are some of the best movie posters of 2016

Rotten Tomatoes compiled a highly subjective list of striking movie posters.

Since the Moonlight and Sausage Party posters are well-known, here are a few lesser-known posters they list. Note: poster quality and film quality do not necessarily correlate. Read the rest

The Hateful Eight's homage to The Thing: shots compared

KINO demonstrates ways in which Tarantino's The Hateful Eight pays homage to John Carpenter's 1982 classic The Thing. Read the rest

Cartoonist John Callahan may finally get a biopic

Quadriplegic alcoholic John Callahan was one of the most controversial American cartoonists from the age of newsprint. Now he may finally be getting a long-awaited film about his life starring Joaquin Phoenix and directed by Gus Van Sant. Read the rest

Watch Warhol eat a Whopper

Andy Warhol eats a Whopper, from Jørgen Leth's 1982 documentary/art film "66 Scenes from America," a collection of moving "postcards" from the United States.

According to YouTube user Hidden Below, who posted this clip, Warhol eating the burger is "a classic ASMR trigger scene, so if you got ASMR you might wanna bookmark this video for a good time."

Noted.

(via Weird Universe)

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The Netflix library has half the titles it did four years ago

Consumer site Extreamist confirms what many suspected: Netflix has sharply reduced its streaming library titles by over 50% from an estimated 11,000 in 2012 to about 5,300 today. Read the rest

Colorized film and photos of a deadly Antarctic Expedition in 1912

In 1912, Herbert Ponting captured remarkable film and images of Captain Robert Falcon Scott's ill-fated Terra Nova Expedition. Amateurs and pros have all worked to restore and colorize Ponting's work. Read the rest

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