The 3 Rules of Living Animation

Why does Who Framed Roger Rabbit seem so much more integrated with live action and animation than anything before it? "Bumping the lamp," slang that YouTuber kaptainkristian says originated from the film for animators who go above and beyond expectations. Read the rest

Watch a little appetizer for the upcoming Alien: Covenant

If you're excited about the upcoming Alien: Covenant, perhaps this little tidbit will tide you over till the main course: Prologue: Last Supper. Read the rest

These vibrant arrangements of diatoms revive a lost Victorian art

Matthew Killip directed this lovely short film about Klaus Kemp, a microscopist whose specialty had its heyday in Victorian times: arranging microscopic creatures into beautiful patterns. Read the rest

Montage of every Best Cinematography Oscar-winning film

Race through some of the most iconic shots in film history with this lovely tribute to the art of cinematography. Read the rest

Watch the terrific reverse thriller REWIND

"Luck is a four-letter word." Watch how this clever film by Atul Taishete unfolds entirely in reverse. Read the rest

Watch this short film of stunning in-camera light effects

FutureDeluxe created this gorgeous series of procedural animations, physical light, and projection based experiments, all of which is shot in camera. It feels like a dose of mushrooms that only lasts one minute. Read the rest

Theatre chains offering all Oscar-nominated films for $4 each

If you're behind on seeing the nine Oscar nominees for best film and a little short on cash, many theatre chains are offering a package to see all nine starting at $35. Even if you only see a few of them, you'll save money over regular prices. Read the rest

Charming short film on creating the perfect bowl of ramen

Many Westerners equate ramen noodles with the cheap dried stuff that poor students and young adults eat, but Criterion Collection is doing their part to change that. They put together this wonderful documentary to support the 4K restoration of "ramen Western" Tampopo, one of the greatest food films ever made. Read the rest

View nature through a Magical Triangle

Dutch filmmaker Ben Winkeler combined his beautiful nature footage with geometric overlays to create Magical Triangle. Read the rest

Kodak is bringing back Ektachrome film

Kodak's Ektachrome film, developed in the 1940s, was a favorite of National Geographic photographers. But digital cameras flatlined the sales and it was discontinued in 2012. A revived interest in film cameras has prompted Kodak to revive the beloved 35mm film. Look for it later this year.

From Kodak's press release:

Ektachrome Film has a distinctive look that was the choice for generations of photographers before being discontinued in 2012. The film, known for its extremely fine grain, clean colors, great tones and contrasts, became iconic in no small part due the extensive use of slide film by National Geographic Magazine over several decades.

Resurgence in the popularity of analog photography has created demand for new and old film products alike. Sales of professional photographic films have been steadily rising over the last few years, with professionals and enthusiasts rediscovering the artistic control offered by manual processes and the creative satisfaction of a physical end product.

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Ladies in films win fights with this weird sexy trick

Seeing more kickass women in films is a good thing, but Dominick Nero at Fandor noticed that their fighting style differs from men in one interesting way: their tendency to pinch their opponents in a scissor lock with their strong yet oh-so-supple thighs. Read the rest

Paul Verhoeven on media's normalization of fascism

LJ Frezza takes a loving look back at how Robocop, Total Recall, and Starship Troopers are wry commentaries on mass media's normalizing effect on sexism, militarism, climate change, corporatism, and state-sponsored terrorism. Read the rest

Quantifying truthfulness in films "based on a true story"

With awards season upon us, lots of films "based on a true story" are in contention. It gives films a little emotional boost to say it really happened, but how much of the film is true? David McCandless created a metric to quantify it based on scene-by-scene analysts. So Selma hets a 100%, and The Imitation game gets 41.4%. Read the rest

Are these the five best end credits of all time?

CineFix makes their arbitrary choice of the best movie end credits in five different styles. Along the way, it's a pretty good survey of the history and styles of end credits. Lots of honorable mentions, though a few good ones inevitably got left out. Read the rest

Will malfunction or incompetence start World War Three?

Eric Schlosser's book and film Command and Control look at the terrifying prospects of nuclear friendly fire, where one of America's nukes detonates on US soil. It also looks at what might happen if a false alarm gets relayed to a trigger-happy general or President. He starts this New Yorker piece with a terrifying story from June 3, 1980:

President Jimmy Carter’s national-security adviser, Zbigniew Brzezinski, was asleep in Washington, D.C., when the phone rang. His military aide, General William Odom, was calling to inform him that two hundred and twenty missiles launched from Soviet submarines were heading toward the United States. Brzezinski told Odom to get confirmation of the attack. A retaliatory strike would have to be ordered quickly; Washington might be destroyed within minutes. Odom called back and offered a correction: twenty-two hundred Soviet missiles had been launched. Brzezinski decided not to wake up his wife, preferring that she die in her sleep. As he prepared to call Carter and recommend an American counterattack, the phone rang for a third time. Odom apologized—it was a false alarm. An investigation later found that a defective computer chip in a communications device at norad headquarters had generated the erroneous warning. The chip cost forty-six cents.

Lots more scary info at the Command and Control film website.

World War Three, by mistake (New Yorker)

Image: Maxwell Hamilton Read the rest

Watch Carrie Fisher roast George Lucas

Carrie Fisher kills it at the American Film Institute's 2005 Life Achievement Award honoring George Lucas.

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Here's your chance to play a dog in Wes Anderson's next film

Wes Anderson is raffling a chance to make dog sounds for his upcoming film Isle of Dogs, among other cool prizes. Proceeds benefit the non-profit Film Foundation, which has restored nearly 700 films. Read the rest

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