Scientist puts his dog on the editorial boards of seven predatory journals as proof of their negligence

By day, "Olivia Doll" sits on the boards of seven academic journals; by night, she's a Staffordshire terrier named Ollie, owned by Mike Daube, a public health expert in Perth, Australia. Read the rest

Watson for Oncology isn't an AI that fights cancer, it's an unproven mechanical turk that represents the guesses of a small group of doctors

There are 50 hospitals on 5 continents that use Watson for Oncology, an IBM product that charges doctors to ingest their cancer patients' records and then make treatment recommendations and suggest journal articles for further reading. Read the rest

Today's art thieves rob via email

London galleries -- and some US dealers -- have been hit by a rash of electronic thefts by crooks who take over the gallery's email accounts and interrupt the transmission of invoices at the close of high-ticket sales, substituting fake invoices with throwaway bank accounts that close up and disappear after the money lands -- then the crooks stay in the email, interrupting "where's my money" emails and sending back fake replies assuring the galleries that the "buyer" is doing all they can to locate the rogue payment. Read the rest

IRS to America: you were probably already doxed before the Equifaxpocalype, so don't worry about it

IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said that he didn't expect the risk of fraud to go up this tax-filing season despite the world-beating Equifax breach of 145,000,000 Americans' sensitive personal and financial data because a "significant" number of Equifax's breaches had already been exposed by earlier breaches of other databases. Read the rest

JP Morgan-Chase paid its billions in fines for mortgage fraud by committing billions in mortgage fraud

A lawsuit against JP Morgan-Chase -- the nation's largest bank -- asserts that the institution paid off the $4,200,000,000 in mortgage forgiveness that it agreed to as a settlement for widescale mortgage and foreclosure fraud by committing a lot more mortgage fraud, in which homeowners, ethical lenders, and American cities were stuck with the bill. Read the rest

Equifax will make hundreds of millions in extra profits from its apocalyptic breach (forever)

At yesterday's Congressional hearings on the Equifax breach, Senator Elizabeth Warren took a moment to enumerate all the ways that Equifax will benefit from doxing 145,500,000 Americans. Read the rest

Predictably, Wells Fargo loves Equifax and suggests investing heavily in the company

Wells Fargo analyst William Warmington Jr has upgraded shares in Equifax to "outperform," predicting that the company will bounce back from the 30% haircut its market cap took when it was revealed that the firm committed the worst commercial data-crime in world history and then twiddled its thumbs for a couple of months before telling anyone and then allowing its CEO to resign. Read the rest

Equifax waited 5 weeks to admit it had doxed 44% of America, did nothing to help us while its execs sold stock

From mid-May to July 2017, Equifax exposed the financial and personal identifying information of 143 million Americans -- 44% of the country -- to hackers, who made off with credit-card details, Social Security Numbers, sensitive credit history data, driver's license numbers, birth dates, addresses, and then, in the five weeks between discovering the breach and disclosing it, the company allowed its top execs to sell millions of dollars' worth of stock in the company, while preparing a visibly defective and ineffective website that provides no useful information to the people whom Equifax has put in grave financial and personal danger through their recklessness. Read the rest

Four years later, we learn why Jamie Dimon's JP Morgan Chase settled US fraud allegations for $13B

In 2013, DOJ lawyers showed JP Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon a draft of a 92-page complaint against his bank. Dimon coughed up $13B to settle the case, and the complaint was sealed, leaving us all to wonder exactly what kind of red-handed fraud convinced Dimon to part with what was then the largest financial misconduct settlement in US history. Read the rest

FTC settles with Lenovo over selling laptops deliberately infected with Superfish spyware

The Federal Trade Commission has announced a settlement with Lenovo over the 2015 revelation that the company pre-installed malware called "Superfish" on its low-end models, which allowed the company to spy on its customers, and also left those customers vulnerable to attacks from third parties, who could exploit Superfish's weakened security. Read the rest

24 hours later, ANOTHER massive Wells Fargo fraud scandal

It's been a whole day since we learned about another example of systematic, widespread fraud by America's largest bank Wells Fargo (ripping off small merchants with credit card fees), so it's definitely time to learn about another one: scamming mortgage borrowers out of $43/month for an unrequested and pointless "home warranty service" from American Home Shield, a billion-dollar scam-factory that considers you a customer if you throw away its junk-mail instead of ticking the "no" box and sending it back. Read the rest

Wells Fargo also gouged small businesses on credit-card fees

The hits keep on coming for the largest bank in America: in addition to stealing millions with fraudulent overdraft fees, creating 2,000,000 fraudulent accounts, blackballing whistleblowers, defrauding mortgage borrowers, and stealing tens of thousands of cars with fraudulent repos, they also grossly overcharged America's struggling small businesses for processing their credit-card fees, according to a new lawsuit. Read the rest

Breaking: Pharma bro Martin Shkreli guilty of fraud

"Pharma bro" Martin Shkreli was found guilty of three felony criminal charges today, including securities fraud.

From Washington Post:

“We’re delighted in many ways,” Shkreli said outside the courtroom, saying he was glad to be exonerated on many of the charges.

“This was a witch hunt of epic proportions,” he said. “They may have found some broomsticks.”

It's unlikely he would have to serve the maximum sentence of 20 years the judge could give him, and it's possible he will not have to go to prison at all and just pay a fine instead. Read the rest

Wells Fargo also defrauded 800,000 car loan customers and stole 25,000 cars

Wells Fargo didn't just steal millions from its customers with crooked overdraft fees, didn't just create 2,000,000 fraudulent accounts and threaten to blackball employees who tried to stop the frauds; didn't just defraud broke mortgage borrowers by the bushel-load -- they also defrauded 800,000 customers with car loans, forcing 274,000 of them into deliquency and "wrongfully repossessing" (that is, stealing) 25,000 of their cars. Read the rest

Audit shows that pharma companies are still cheating by suppressing trials

It's been years since the major pharma companies agreed to participate in the Registry of All Trials, meaning that they'd end the practice of only reporting on trials whose outcomes they were pleased with, leaving about half of all trials unreported-on. Read the rest

First known US example of a gas-pump skimmer that uses SMS to exfiltrate data

This credit-card skimmer was removed from a New York gas pump; it uses components scavenged from a cellular phone and a T-Mobile SIM to send the credit card details it harvests to its owners, who can retrieve them from anywhere in the world. Read the rest

Networks hide badly rated shows by misspelling their names in Nielsen submissions

When a network TV show performs badly, the networks deliberately introduce errors into the episodes' metadata before submitting it to the Nielsen ratings, so that the episode is counted as a separate show and doesn't bring the season's average rating down. Read the rest

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