Bill Nye: What if all the ice melted on Earth?

screenshot

It would not be cool. At all. (AsapSCIENCE)

Read the rest

Yes, this is a tactical spork

81lS5iDS0sL._SL1500_
Ka-Bar's Tactical Spork is ideal for the most extreme KFC eaters.

The Tactical Spork, which is made from food and water approved Grilamid, is equipped with a fork/spoon combo and has a serrated knife hidden in the handle. The knife is accessed by pulling the spork in opposite directions from each extreme end

Ka-Bar Tactical Spork (Amazon) Read the rest

Funeral fundraising scam jars feature face of woman who is not dead

screenshot

Over the weekend, the mother of Lupita Gonzalez heard from a family member in Shafter, California who was concerned that Lupita had died. Apparently, the person had spotted a donation jar emblazoned with Lupita's photo and a request to help send the woman's remains back to Mexico for burial. Lupita is just fine and lives in the next town over.

The photo had been grabbed from Gonzalez's Facebook page and taped to at least three jars placed on store countertops.

"It's a scary feeling," Gonzalez said.

Bakersfield Now reports that the "jars had a sob story about a girl named 'Enriquetta Nunez' who had died and whose family needed money to bring her remains back to Mexico."

Police are investigating. Read the rest

Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice, starring Christopher Reeve and Michael Keaton

This would have been better. (stryderHD)

Read the rest

Bad trips may be good for you

A "bad trip" on psychedelic mushrooms may lead to "enduring increases in well-being," according to a new study from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Neuroscientist Roland Griffiths and colleagues surveyed nearly 2,000 adults about their psilocybin experiences. Those who experienced bad trips had taken, on average, a powerful dose of 4 grams. From Psypost:

A majority of the participants — 62 percent — said their bad trip was among the top 10 most psychologically difficult situations of their lives. Eleven percent said it was their number one most difficult experience.

But 34 percent of participants said the bad trip was among the top five most personally meaningful experiences of their life and 31 percent said it was the among the top five most spiritually significant. And 76 percent said the bad trip had resulted in an improved sense of personal well-being or life satisfaction. Forty-six percent said they would be willing to experience the bad trip all over again.

"Survey study of challenging experiences after ingesting psilocybin mushrooms: Acute and enduring positive and negative consequences" (Journal of Psychopharmacology) Read the rest

Brain's "reward system" also tied to sleep-wake states

According to Stanford University researchers, a primary circuit in the brain's reward involving the chemical "feel-good" chemical dopamine, is also essential for controlling our sleep-wake cycles.

“Insomnia, a multibillion-dollar market for pharmaceutical companies, has traditionally been treated with drugs such as benzodiazepines that nonspecifically shut down the entire brain," says psychiatry and behavior science professor Luis de Lecea "Now we see the possibility of developing therapies that, by narrowly targeting this newly identified circuit, could induce much higher-quality sleep.”

From Stanford:

It makes intuitive sense that the reward system, which motivates goal-directed behaviors such as fleeing from predators or looking for food, and our sleep-wake cycle would coordinate with one another at some point. You can’t seek food in your sleep, unless you’re an adept sleepwalker. Conversely, getting out of bed is a lot easier when you’re excited about the day ahead of you...

The reward system’s circuitry is similar in all vertebrates, from fish, frogs and falcons to fishermen and fashion models. A chemical called dopamine plays a crucial role in firing up this circuitry.

Neuroscientists know that a particular brain structure, the ventral tegmental area, or VTA, is the origin of numerous dopamine-secreting nerve fibers that run in discrete tracts to many different parts of the brain. A plurality of these fibers go to the nucleus accumbens, a forebrain structure particularly implicated in generating feelings of pleasure in anticipation of, or response to, obtaining a desired objective.

“Since many reward-circuit-activating drugs such as amphetamines that work by stimulating dopamine secretion also keep users awake, it’s natural to ask if dopamine plays a key role in the sleep-wake cycle as well as in reward,” Eban-Rothschild said.

Read the rest

There may be a sixth basic taste: starchiness

untitled

New research suggests that humans have a sixth basic taste in addition to sweetness, sourness, saltiness, bitterness, and umami. According to Oregon State University food scientist Juyun Lim, "we can taste other chemicals that comprise foods such as starch degradation products and fatty acids." In a study published in the journal Chemical Senses, they report that "the ability to taste starch or its oligomeric hydrolysis products would be highly adaptive, given their nutritional value."

"Humans use starch as a major source of energy, which enables the body to perform its functions," Lim told CNN.

Other researchers' candidates for a sixth basic taste include fat and calcium. Read the rest

Jailed driver used frying pan as replacement steering wheel

1472992607664

A fellow in Adelaide, Australia was arrested for several traffic offenses including using a modified (and magic-markered) frying pan as a steering wheel. From the South Australia Police:

Further checks revealed the car was unregistered and uninsured and had recently been defected and the defect label had been removed.

The 32-year-old from Adelaide was charged with driving unregistered, uninsured, drive contrary to defect, remove defect label, alter number plate and breach of bail. He has been bailed to appear in the Adelaide Magistrates Court on 11 October.

Read the rest

Little green army men in yoga poses

screenshot

Yoga Joes are a clever series of little green plastic army men in rather impressive yoga poses. Namaste, sergeant. Advanced Yoga Joes are available for pre-order in the following poses:

• Firefly • Advanced Side Plank • Scorpion • Peacock • King Pigeon - Mermaid Arm Variation • Lotus Headstand - Spherical Helmet Variation (Yes he really balances.)

(via Laughing Squid)

Read the rest

Watching ice cream bars melt can be as glorious as it is depressing

So tragic yet I... can't... look... away.

Read the rest

Camouflage ice cream

920x1240

Brenham, Texas-based BlueBell Creameries has launched a new "Camo 'n Cream" camouflage ice cream. It's a combo, containing pistachio almond, milk chocolate and cream cheese flavors. The packaging features woodland pattern camouflage which I guess makes sense given the ice cream was launched on the first day of dove hunting season in texas. Yum?

(Houston Chronicle) Read the rest

The spores of club moss have magical powers

Lycopodium powder, made from dry spores of clubmoss plants, is used by magicians and special effects artists as flash powder (aka "dragon's breath"), as a lubricant on latex gloves and condoms, and of course to do the impressive science experiments seen in the video above.

"In physics experiments and demonstrations, lycopodium powder is used to make sound waves in air visible for observation and measurement, and to make a pattern of electrostatic charge visible," according to Wikipedia. "The powder is also highly hydrophobic; if the surface of a cup of water is coated with lycopodium powder, a finger or other object inserted straight into the cup will come out dusted with the powder but remain perfectly dry."

You can purchase an inexpensive supply from Amazon: Lycopodium Powder

Read the rest

The origin of that familiar "font" used in comic book lettering

screenshot

Decades before the banality of Comic Sans, there was the fantastic hand-lettering of Artie Simek, Sam Rosen, and a handful of other artists with beautiful penmanship.

Read the rest

Flowers in near-space

160830154052-azuma-makoto-7-super-169
Japanese artist Makoto Azuma launched a beautiful bouquet and a 50-year-old bonsai tree on a high-altitude balloon 30,000 meters into the atmosphere (about 1/3 of the way to space) to capture a beautiful series of images with Earth's curvature visible in the background. The project is titled "Exobotanica." From a CNN interview with Azuma:

When did you realize you wanted to work with natural materials to create art?

While I was running a flower shop, putting together bouquets and decoration, I thought I could find a new type of flower by applying a new expression on the flowers themselves. Besides merely making bouquets as presents or table top decoration, I thought it would be possible to capture the beauty in a photograph or video while the flower is changing its shape. It is like slicing out a moment for keeping the beauty eternal...

It took you around six months to prepare for Exobiotanica, one of your most extreme and perhaps best-known projects. Can you tell us a bit about this work?

(Creating) Exobiotanica was a fight against a temperature of minus 60 degree Celsius (-76 degrees Fahrenheit). It is more to show the flowers' beauty, even in a frozen state or even when they are shattered, rather than how to bloom beautifully. It (the art) went into space, so the body had to be chunky and the structure well cemented. Making just an art object was not a goal at all. I needed to choose flowers that can complete to form a good contrast in space.

Read the rest

Watch Nirvana play "Smells Like Teen Spirit" two days after 'Nevermind' release

On September 26, 1991, Nirvana performed "Smells Like Teen Spirit" at The Moon, a small club in New Haven, Connecticut. This was two days after the release of Nevermind and moments before punk broke (down). Read the rest

Teenager dies from hickey

800px-Love_bite

A 17-year-old boy in Mexico City has died after reportedly receiving a hickey from his 24-year-old girlfriend. According to physicians, the hickey suction likely caused a blood clot that traveled to his brain, resulting in a deadly stroke. It's rare for a hickey to cause a stroke but it does happen. From WWMT:

In a 2010 case... reported in a New Zealand Medical Journal where a 44-year-old woman was rushed to the hospital after losing movement in her arm due to a hickey on her neck, Doctors weren't sure why the woman was having a stroke, but then noticed a bruise on her neck and realized the suction on a major artery created a blood clot. According to an interview with the doctor who treated the woman, Dr Teddy Whu, the clot was in the "artery underneath where the hickey was" (and the clot traveled to the woman's heart.)

Read the rest

Massive amount of cocaine found at Coca-Cola plant

enjoy-cocaine-t-shirt

A pile of cocaine worth US$55 million was found at a Coca-Cola plant in Signes, France.

"The first elements of the investigation have shown that employees are in no way involved," said regional Coca-Cola president Jean-Denis Malgras.

The 370kg stash of bagged blow was discovered in a shipment of orange juice concentrate from South America.

When first launched at the end of the 19th century, a glass of Coca-Cola was estimated to contain nine milligrams of cocaine. In 1904, the company replaced that ingredient with cocaine-free coca leaf extract. Or at least that's what they tell us.

(BBC)

Read the rest

More posts