David Pescovitz

David Pescovitz is Boing Boing's co-editor/managing partner and Medium's head of creative services. On Instagram, he's @pesco.

Weird things human sent into the stratosphere (mostly as marketing)

Including: bacon (video above), beer, Lego Minifigures, a toy robot, an armchair... the list goes on, over at Smithsonian.

"Vampire grave" from the 13th century unearthed

An archaeologist found a "vampire grave" in Bulgaria where a Medieval skeleton lies with an iron spike through its chest.

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Batman postage stamps

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Batman is now on a postage stamp!

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FOUND: new musical based on the 'zine

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Davy Rothbart's fantastic zine FOUND is now a musical playing at the Atlantic Theater Company, and BB pal Larry Smith gives it a rave review. Larry writes:

FOUND is the story of a shy Jewish kid named Davy Rothbart who accidentally creates FOUND Magazine, and the unexpected inspiration, humor and love the project brings people across the world. Like so many of the best projects out there, it's amazing it even got made and it's strange and totally wonderful.

At last night's show, no less a figure then Ira Glass (you know him as Maury Kind) gushed after the show in the most erudite, Glass-ian way about how inspired this unexpected magazine-to-musical adaptation is. I too was floored, but could only come up with, "That was awesome, dude," and that was not just the Jolly Rancher talking.

So go remember why you love weirdos like Davy and cities like New York and see FOUND: The Musical before its run closes on Nov. 9.

1950s "bionic" arm

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When I was young in the 1970s, I was blown away by photos of the 1950s battery-powered "bionic" arm invented by IBM engineer SW Alderson. The technology is now more than 60 years old and it still looks futuristic to me.

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Pakistan's scorpion hunters

In Pakistan, a black scorpion weighing 60 grams sells for around $50,000 to medical researchers. Al Jazeera's Maham Javaid investigates the country's scorpion trade and its possible harm to the country's ecosystem. From Al Jazeera:

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Shahid and Sohail, two friends who grew up together in a housing colony in Sindh province's Thatta district, have never been scared of the scorpion's venomous sting.

"As teenagers, we caught and killed scorpions as a game," Sohail told Al Jazeera. "Last year we found out that if we caught a live one, we could be instant millionaires."

On the hottest nights of the year, these hunters search for the nocturnal creatures in the 200-hectare dry forest behind their colony. Scorpions hibernate in cold weather, so Sohail says it is easier to catch them when it's hot.

Their broker, Faraz, is constantly in contact with other brokers who can sell the scorpion to foreign companies for thousands of dollars.

"I spend all my spare time connecting scorpion buyers with sellers," Faraz, who also works at Karachi Port Trust, told Al Jazeera. "When a big deal goes through, it will be like winning the lottery."

"The scorpion hunters of Pakistan

Ransom & Mitchell: imaginary sideshow portraits

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The dynamically dark duo Ransom & Mitchell have a new show of incredible sideshow-themed photographs opening tomorrow, October 11, at San Francisco's Bash Contemporary gallery. Don't be fooled: Most of what you see in these portraits of the Rough & Ready Sideshow entertainers is real, from the costumes and make-up to the handcrafted sets and vintage props. Step right up!

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eBay: Huge collection of 80s-90s console videogames

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On eBay: a massive collection of 5700 console games, 5700+ games, and custom shelves for it all. Buy it now for (gulp) $164,000.

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Jakub Rozalski's dystopian sci-fi countryside paintings

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The future bullies its way into the traditional European countryside in German artist Jakub Rozalski's dystopian paintings.

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Photos of silly Victorian era people

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These Victorian Era photos of people making silly faces delight me to no end.

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Chocolate records

Peter Lardong makes playable (and edible) records from chocolate, a century-old tradition we've posted about previously. (via Laughing Squid)

Scientific evidence of very brief "life after death"?

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The largest scientific study of "life after death" and near death experiences in cardiac arrest patients (who were resuscitated) suggests that some people may sustain several minutes of awareness after the heart stops.

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The In Vitro Meat Cookbook

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Unreal lab-grown oysters from "The In Vitro Meat Cookbook," a glorious exercise in recipes as design fiction from Next Nature. More over at re:form.

Frozen, the chip tune

Frozen, 16-bit.

Haim and Stevie Nicks play "Rhiannon"

Fleetwood Mac's Stevie Nicks invites Haim over to hang out as the New York Times listens in on the conversation and we're all treated to a pretty great stripped-down version of Rhiannon by the foursome. From the New York Times:

Danielle (Haim), who tends to have little to say to the press and often appears bored on camera, had the most questions for Nicks, leaning forward intently and nodding. She was eager to talk about music, and wondered when Nicks knew it was going to “happen” for her.

A slight frown grazed Nicks’s mouth. “There is a song by Buffalo Springfield called ‘Rock ‘n’ Roll Woman,’ and the first time I heard it, I was like, That’s me. That’s who I’m going to be. I remember walking through a room, going, ‘Do you know who I am?’ It’s like, the Red Sea is definitely going to part here. My mom used to always say, ‘You paint the picture and it will happen.’ I believe that if you close your eyes and see yourself up on that stage, being bigger than life, you become that person with that big, really good attitude. You’re gonna be that rock ‘n’ roll woman that’s gonna make people happy and take them out of their miserable lives for two hours . . . and they’re going to want your music. And then, girls . . . at 66 years old, you can be starting a year-and-a-half tour that sold out its U.S. dates — in the first week.”