Gorgeous 3D printed trilobites

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D. Allan Drummond, the University of Chicago biologist who recently 3D printed and cast a fascinating model of a yeast cell dividing, also creates exquisite bronze sculptures of trilobites, marine arthropods that went extinct 250 million years ago. Images and video below.

See more at Professor Drummond's Instagram feed.

(via SciAm)

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"The Chickening," a deeply weird remix of The Shining

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The Chickening, directed by Nick DenBoer and Davy Force:

It is a theatrical trailer for a fictional film in which Stanley Kubrick’s classic film T​he Shining​has been artfully transformed into a new, poultry­infused comedy adventure by digitally altering the film to create a new narrative. This new style of filmmaking is a hilarious collision of classic films with modern day visual effects; “Cinegraffiti” — the ultimate neo­nostalgic visual feast for this digital age.

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Meet the composer of "Schoolhouse Rock!"

Conjunction Junction, what's your function? That iconic tune (below) and others from the "Schoolhouse Rock!" cartoon were the work of composer Bob Dorough, now 92-years-old and still playing music. (Great Big Story)

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Marvin Minsky, artificial intelligence pioneer, RIP

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MIT professor Marvin Minsky, a "founding father" of the field of artificial intelligence whose work opened up new vistas in computer science, cognitive psychology, philosophy, robotics, and optics, has died of a brain hemorrhage. He was 88.

In 1959, Minsky co-founded MIT's Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (now the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory) and dedicated his career to exploring how we might replicate the functions of the human brain in a machine, a research journey he hoped would help us better understand our own minds.

"No computer has ever been designed that is ever aware of what it's doing," Minsky once said. "But most of the time, we aren't either."

(New York Times)

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What is the difference between USA and USB?

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What is the difference between USA and USB?

One connects to all of your devices and accesses the data, the other is a hardware standard.

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A quick "fuck you" of a card trick

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Card manipulator Alix Becle:

A video posted by Alix Becle (@alixbcl) on Jan 2, 2016 at 7:16am PST

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Family finds strange, black "walking" fish

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A family found this odd "walking fish" in New Zealand's Bay of Islands. Unable to keep it alive, they sent it to the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa who identified it as a striped frogfish (Antennarius striatus) that is very unusual because it's almost entirely black.

"There are competing theories around this," the museum posted. "Is it one highly variable species, or several? The tissue sample we took will help to answer this."

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Backyard transformed into snow maze for dogs

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Reddit user anneewannee shoveled a backyard snow labyrinth for dogs to play in! I hope they don't run into Jack Torrance.

(r/pics)

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Watch an astronaut play liquid ping pong in space

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly demonstrates ping pong with a sphere of water on the International Space Station. From NASA:

The paddles are polycarbonate laser etched so that the surfaces are actually arrays of 300 micrometer posts (0.3mm). The surfaces were then spray coated with a Teflon coat. The combined effects of surface roughness and non-wettability produce a super-hydrophobic surface capable of preventing water adhesion in dynamic processes. The larger the drop, the less force it takes to break it up. The smaller the drop, the harder you can hit it. Scott is demonstrating about a 4 mL drop (over 100 times larger than a rain drop).

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Perry Farrell (Jane's Addiction) sings The Beatles' "Here Comes The Sun"

From George Fest: A Night To Celebrate The Music Of George Harrison that took place in L.A. in 2014. Also making the scene were Norah Jones, Wayne Coyne (Flaming Lips), Dhani Harrison (George's son), Ian Astbury (The Cult), Britt Daniel (Spoon), Ben Harper, Ann Wilson (Heart), and many others. The whole event will be available next month on CD, Blu-Ray, digital download, and vinyl. Trailer below.

George Fest: A Night To Celebrate The Music Of George Harrison (Amazon)

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: "Are we ready for 'Bigfoot" or the Loch Ness Monster?"

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In 1977, the US Department of Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service published a fascinating document asking what the government would do if Bigfoot or something like the Loch Ness Monster were to be found? The paper goes on to explain the laws and regulations in place to deal with such a discovery, and also mentions 20th century discoveries like the Komodo dragon and cryptozoology's darling, the coelacanth. From the document:

Finding a Loch Ness monster or Bigfoot is still a possibility, and the discovery would be one of the most important in modern history. As items of scientific and public interest they would surely command more attention than the moon rocks. Millions of curiosity seekers”and thou- sands of zoologists and anthropologists throughout the world would be eager to “get at” the creatures to examine, protect, capture, or just look at them....

Under U.S. Law, the Secretary of the Interior is empowered to list as threatened or endangered a species for 120 days on an emergency basis. For endangered species in the United States, the Secretary can also desig- nate habitat that is critical to their survival. No Federal agency could then authorize, fund, or carry out any activities which would adversely modify that habitat.

So long-term Federal protection of Nessie or Bigfoot would basically be a matter of following the same regulatory mechanisms already used in protecting whooping cranes and tigers.

“Under normal situations,” said Keith Schreiner, then Associate Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “we must know a great deal about a species before we list it.

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Man makes money suctioning beer cans to his head

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Jamie Keeton of Evergreen Park, Illinois says he makes $1,000 a day suctioning cans and other objects to his head. He recently took his show to China and says he will soon land a Guinness World Record for the unique talent.

"Twenty three years ago, I shaved my head for the first time," Keeton told WZZM13. "And I was at a ball game. I was trying to cool my head down because it was a hot day. And all of a sudden they hit a home run," Keeton said. "I went up to grab it... I missed it, and then said, 'Where's my drink?' Everybody was laughing... The drink was stuck to the back of my head. The drink was pouring out of it."

According to one doctor, the ability stems from Keeton's slightly high baseline body temperature of 100 degrees. Read the rest

Anthony Geary of General Hospital touts the virtues of Members Only jackets (1982)

"When I put one on, something happens." (Thanks, UPSO!)

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Derek Zoolander: The Vogue Interview

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From Vogue's "73 Questions" series. Below, this month's Vogue cover, shot by Annie Leibovitz.

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Glenn Frey of the Eagles, RIP

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Glenn Frey, founding guitarist and singer of the Eagles, has died. He was 67. Frey's death was attributed to complications from rheumatoid arthritis, acute ulcerative colitis and pneumonia.

(Eagles.com)

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Astronomers unofficially designate a David Bowie "constellation"

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Studio Brussels asked astronomers at Belgium's MIRA Public Observatory to select stars that would make a fitting asterism in memory of David Bowie. (Of course, only the International Astronomical Union can officially name stars and other astronomical objects, and it's almost always with a number.)

In any case, this effort was tied to the "Stardust for Bowie" annotation project for Google Sky. There is also an unrelated Change.org petition to "Rename planet Mars after David Bowie."

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Electrified fork makes food taste saltier

University of Tokyo food hacker Hiromi Nakamura is developing an electrified fork that zaps your taste buds with low current to make food taste saltier, without using so much salt. Sounds kinda like licking a battery, only not quite as bitter. (Munchies)

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