Mark Frauenfelder

Mark Frauenfelder is the founder of Boing Boing and the founding editor-in-chief of MAKE. He is editor-in-chief of Cool Tools and co-founder of Wink Books. Twitter: @frauenfelder. His new book is Maker Dad: Lunch Box Guitars, Antigravity Jars, and 22 Other Incredibly Cool Father-Daughter DIY Projects



Men determined to kill Bigfoot

Gulf Coast Bigfoot Research Organization looks like your average grumpy white guy paramilitary organization, but they are actually a well-oiled team of devoted Bigfoot hunters on a mission to "protect the public and harvest a specimen to prove it's real."

The TV show Killing Bigfoot from Gryphon Productions premieres Friday, October 17th on Destination America.

The Blue Shed, by Amy Crehore

TheBlueShedlarge
Artist Amy Crehore's latest painting is called The Blue Shed.

Bizarre panorama photo stitch

panoCoke Zero hired David Cronenberg and Tod Browning to take panorama photos of worshippers at a recent prolate-spheroid chasing ritual. The result was awesome.

STUDY: artificial sweeteners can raise blood sugar levels more than sugar

sweetNature published a study about the potential danger of artificial sweeteners.

Read the rest

New York Times feature about butts

The NY Times, always on the cutting edge, has an article about the popularity of butts.

(What, no link to Ms. Selter's Instagram account?)

Watch: art thief foiled

Best part is 38 seconds in, when he tries to stuff the framed work of art into his jacket and learns it doesn't fit.

"Staff stopped him as he left and recovered the piece. Police are now trying to trace the would be thief."

WATCH: art from tiny diatoms

The Diatomist is a short documentary about Klaus Kemp, master of the Victorian art of diatom arrangement.

Diatoms are single cell algae that create jewel-like glass shells around themselves. Microscopists of the Victorian era would arrange them into complex patterns, invisible to the naked eye but spectacular when viewed under magnification.The best of these arrangements are stunning technical feats that reveal the hidden grandeur of some of the smallest organisms on Earth. Klaus Kemp has devoted his entire life to understanding and perfecting diatom arrangement and he is now acknowledged as the last great practitioner of this beautiful combination of art and science. The Diatomist showcases his incredible work.

Soundtrack by Ryuichi Sakamoto, Bernard Herrmann and Cults Percussion Ensemble.

Matthew Killip is an English filmmaker living in New York. His documentaries have been broadcast on UK television and exhibited in festivals including Sundance and True/False.

Wow! (Via Arbroath)

Futility Closet 26: A Practical Joke on a Grand Scale

berners street hoaxIn 1810 someone told hundreds of London merchants that Mrs. Tottenham at 54 Berners Street had requested their services. She hadn't. For a full day the street was packed with crowds of deliverymen struggling to reach a single door -- and the practical joker was never caught.

In this episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll hear descriptions of the chaos in Berners Street and meet Theodore Hook, the man who probably planned the whole thing. We'll also revisit the mysterious corpse found on an Australian beach in 1948 and puzzle over an octopus stuck in a tree.

Show notes

Most feminist moments in sci-fi history

[S]ci-fi history actually has featured ahead-of-its-time, female-identifying authors and creators who have challenged conventional notions of race, gender, and sexuality head-on for centuries. Their contributions are so essential (some are by far the most out-there in the canon) that without them, the genre could not possibly have grown into the blockbuster behemoth it is today.

From Devon Maloney's story in NYMag

Footballer Adrian Peterson barred from playing

Suspected child abuser Adrian Peterson has been barred from participating in a lucrative and violent ritual in which two rival groups of men fight over the possession of a small prolate spheroid made from tanned cowhide.

Cult leaders will continue to pay Peterson his full salary, which is $11.75 million per season. It is not yet known whether Peterson will be allowed to retain a prolate spheroid for personal use.

The Freedom to Be Foolish

Colin Marshall came to my house and interviewed me for his excellent Notebook on Cities and Culture podcast. Listen to it here.

Colin Marshall sits down in Studio City with Mark Frauenfelder, founder of the popular zine-turned-blog Boing Boing, founding co-editor of Make magazine, and author of Maker Dad: Lunch Box Guitars, Antigravity Jars, and 22 Other Incredibly Cool Father-Daughter DIY Projects. They discuss whether he still thinks about Los Angeles dingbat apartments, and the extent to which their owners have customized them today; all barriers falling for the modern maker except for the one asking who’s interested; how his daughters’ fascination with card tricks preceded their interest in making things; what kind of project kids can complete under their own steam; Los Angeles as a place for makers, the current state of its maker spaces, and the making heritage offered by its historical hot-rod culture as described in Tom Wolfe’s The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby; his history with this city, which goes back to 1987, albeit one interrupted by periods in Japan, on a South Pacific island, and elsewhere; the semi-agricultural life- and making style Los Angeles affords him; how growing your own food allows you to think more clearly about food, and making your own media allows you to think more clearly about media; how his grasp of media improved as he engaged in every stage of the D.I.Y. publishing revolution; learning through mistakes, as opposed to school’s pressure not to make mistakes in the first place; the debilitating world of the “smart kid”; the “freedom to be foolish” offered in Los Angeles; the dueling temptations of broadminded generalism and singleminded obsession; his role in the cyberpunk culture of the 80s and 90s, and to what extent we live in the utopian and/or dystopian future it envisioned today; his hope for an increasingly tech-focused San Francisco to continue exporting progressive ideas; the rise of meta-making, and the promise of large-scale decentralized making of solving some of “the world’s problems”; how he deals with the firehose of amazing stuff to feature on Boing Boing and in Make; and what his daughters have taught him about making while he’s taught them about making.

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter — Notes from the Zombie Apocalypse

Some of my favorite things about zombie movies are the details of the changed world. The dead grass, broken windows, toppled telephone poles, abandoned cars with missing wheels and trunks left open, boarded-up buildings, spent ammo shells, and other signs of struggle and desperation serve to create a fascinatingly creepy environment.

Read the rest

WATCH: authorities obsessed with inspecting people's anuses

The case of Timothy Young made national headlines in 2012 when New Mexico police anally probed him in search of drugs (no contraband was found). His ordeal was the result of a false positive alert by a drug-sniffing police dog. Incredibly, the same dog was involved in a case involving another New Mexico resident that resulted in forced rectal exams that uncovered no drugs. That case ended with authorities paying a $1.6 million settlement (Young's case is still pending).

Although presented as impartial and infallible, it turns out that such dogs are not only often poorly trained, they are frequently wrong.

WATCH: self-appointed vigilante punishes litterbugs

This Russian motorcyclist throws trash into the windows of litterbugs she comes across.

Bacon and eggs grilled in air

Breakfast cooked as it should be - on a levitating aluminum hot plate. From Popular Science, 1966.