UK launches massive study of aspirin's cancer-fighting ability


The UK's NHS’s National Institute for Health Research announced it will embark on a 12-year study involving 11,000 patients to study the effects of aspirin on different types of cancer.

From Motherboard:

It’s not the first time scientists have looked into whether aspirin could help stave off cancer. One 2012 study that found that a daily low-dose aspirin lowered the risk of developing common lung, prostate, and colon cancers by an average of 46 percent. In 2014, another study published in the Annals of Oncology confirmed that aspirin “protects most strongly” against bowel, stomach, and oesophageal cancers, and also more weakly against lung, prostate, and breast cancers. The study found that aspirin prevented fewer deaths from both cancer and heart attacks in a population tghat took aspirin every day. And just this week, a study found that aspirin could help women with a particular inflammatory condition increase their chances of getting pregnant by 17 percent.

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Antioxidants protect cancer cells, help tumors to spread


The largely unregulated supplement industry sells a variety of weird and sometimes dangerous stuff that it wink-nudge promises will cure what ails you, but even the most accurately labeled, evidence-based supplements can make sick people much, much sicker. Read the rest

Cancer patient receives 3D printed titanium ribs and sternum


Melbourne, Australia's Lab 22 produced a 3D printed, custom set of ribs and artificial sternum that were implanted into a 54-year-old male Spanish cancer patient's chest-cavity at Salamanca University Hospital. Read the rest

Indoor tanning contributes to doubling of melanoma rate in 30 years


Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer is on the rise, due in part to the increased popularity of indoor tanning beds, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly a third of young white woman visit a tanning at least once a year. Also at risk: older white men, who are less apt to use sunblocking preparations.

Image: "George Forman Grill for cannibals" Shutterstock Read the rest

Man plays Beatles song "Yesterday" on guitar while undergoing surgery for brain cancer

The 33-year-old patient sang and played guitar while the doctors performed the surgery. It began with a song he composed for his son, born a few months ago, followed by "Yesterday" by the Beatles, and other tunes.

Condolence cards designed by a cancer survivor


If you want a card for a friend or family member who has cancer, Emily McDowell -- who survived Stage 3 Hodgkin’s lymphoma at age 24 -- has created the best I've seen: Witty, warm, and acerbic.

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World’s oldest African penguin gets cancer surgery

Tess, a 40 year old African penguin who lives at the Pueblo Zoo in Colorado, has an aggressive skin cancer on her face. She was taken to Colorado State University in Fort Collins, where she was zapped with radiation. She seems to be recovering nicely, and is back at the zoo, swimming with her friends. Read the rest

Help Spider Robinson's daughter pay her cancer bills

Writer Spider Robinson writes, "My daughter Terri Luanna da Silva, a Stage IV breast cancer patient since 2011, is now in hospice in the Palliative Care wing of Middlesex Hospital, 28 Crescent St, Middletown CT 06457-36454. She is not expected to recover. (No visitors, please. But cards and flowers are welcome.)" Read the rest

How I use medical marijuana: vaporizers, science, weed, and cancer

A primer on the healing power of weed, and how to vaporize correctly, for cancer patients and others who truly have a medical need for marijuana. Sponsored by Ascent by DaVinci, a vaporizer we think works really well.

Punktober, not Pinktober

A sickly-sweet, brand-policed, trivializing ad campaign cannot communicate the awful reality of breast cancer experienced by sufferers and their families. Naomi Horn on why she doesn't go pink.

Beauty After Breast Cancer: kickstarting a photography book on our bodies, in treatment and beyond

“What if among the many overwhelming materials you see at the time of a breast cancer diagnosis there was a simple book that inspired hope instead of fear, and showed beauty instead of disfigurement?”

Drug derived from sea creature may help ovarian cancer patients

"Sifting through puddles from the firehose of last week’s American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting brought to my attention some promising news from the world of ovarian cancer," writes David Kroll.

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Lab mistakes are wasting millions in research funding

Medicine starts with cells in a petri dish. But, increasingly, scientists are realizing they've been studying the wrong cells, writes Maggie Koerth-Baker.

The difference between cancersploitation and art, according to a cancer survivor

Writing at TIME, my friend and fellow breast cancer survivor Lani Horn (aka Chemobabe) says whether we view cancer films like "The Fault in our Stars" as outsiders or insiders, the best movies in the genre provide catharsis.

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Movies: 'The Fault in Our Stars' reviewed by young woman, 14, whose mom survived cancer

Naomi Horn, 14, reviews the film adaptation of John Green's best-selling book about young adults with cancer who find love. Naomi is no stranger to cancer: her mom is a survivor, and others in her family have died of the disease.

Number of cancer survivors in US expected to grow 30% over next decade

A new report from the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute says the population of cancer survivors in the US will expand by 30% in the next ten years. LA Times:
As of Jan. 1, there were nearly 14.5 million people alive in the United States who had been diagnosed with some type of cancer. By 2024, that figure is projected to reach 18.9 million, according to a report released Sunday by the American Cancer Society. The authors of the report – from the ACS and the National Cancer Institute – define a cancer “survivor” as anyone who has been diagnosed with cancer and is still alive.
Here's the full report from the ACS. Read the rest

A scarf woven from Jay Lake's genome

Here's a scarf woven from data representing the genome of talented sf writer and good guy Jay Lake, who died of cancer this week. Last summer, Jay's friends raised funds to sequence his genome in the hopes of finding a targeted cure. Astrid Bear used the data to weave the scarf, focusing on the 143 pairs of chromosome 18, which was the identified culprit in Jay's cancer. The scarf itself is a thing of beauty, and Jay loved it. Read the rest

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