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The Dune in our Heads

A problem crops up when filmmakers try to adapt epic fantasy worlds to the big screen—particularly beloved, richly-imagined literary ones. Sacrifices must be made. Characters are cut, and plotlines are re-routed. Scenes and places don’t match what readers have pictured with their minds. Fans of the original book cry foul.

In the case of director Alejandro Jodorowsky, his vision for Frank Herbert’s masterwork Dune was so over the top, so surreal (and, at times, so absurd), it probably would have blown the minds of critics before they had a chance to grumble.

That is, if Jodorowsky’s translation and transmogrification of Dune had ever been made. It never was.

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Bot & Dolly and the rise of creative robotics

Remember this incredible video above? In the new issue of BusinessWeek, I profile the brilliant minds behind it, creative robotics studio Bot & Dolly, whose astonishing technology was also instrumental in the special effects of Gravity:

Behind a small cafe in San Francisco’s Potrero Hill neighborhood stands an unmarked warehouse where the future of human-machine interaction is taking shape. Inside this sprawling maze of soundstages, machine shops, and computer labs, artists collaborate with engineers, cinematographers brainstorm with coders, and everyone has a collegial relationship with the small army of industrial robots stationed here. This is Bot & Dolly, a boutique design studio that specializes in combining massive mechanical arms with custom software for movies, architecture, digital fabrication, and entertainment installations. “We’re a culture of makers, of creators with open minds,” says Tobias Kinnebrew, Bot & Dolly’s director for product strategy. “We work on things that don’t seem possible and try to make them possible.”
"Bot & Dolly and the Rise of Creative Robots"

On Justified, Raylan’s getting a little old for this... [Recap, season 5, episode 10]

 

I never thought I’d say this, but Justified could really use Arlo Givens back. Without his father, Raylan Givens has meandered throughout the season, unmoored from his family connection to Harlan County, and detached from his ex-wife and infant daughter now residing down in Florida. He’s truly the lone wolf now, with barely any professional connection to the other Marshals in his office, a Cold War standoff with Art, and a clean break from Alison. There was a time when a lonely Raylan made for some fireworks—as recently as last season, with him living above the bar, getting into trouble with the owner downstairs. But now, as he ticks closer to his breaking point of frustration with the area, with the office, and with the long lonely existence ahead of him, Raylan has become a lethargic quip-machine. It’s still a joy to watch Olyphant in the part, and his drawl is intoxicating, but he’s now been around the track one too many times, rounding up criminals who are just a spectral repetition of more interesting characters from previous seasons.

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Photos of actors playing historical figures

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VanVictor made a terrific image series showing historical figures played by various actors, from Aristotle to Edgar Allen Poe, Jesus to John Lennon. "Famous people in fiction" (via Laughing Squid and Reddit)

New Peanuts movie represents three generations of the Schulz dynasty

A new Peanuts movie will come to the big screen on November 6, 2015, produced by Charles Schulz's son Craig Schulz with a screenplay co-written by his son Bryan Schulz.

"It's about a round-headed kid and his dog, and that's about as far as I'm willing to go," Craig Schulz told USA Today.

Hal Douglas, famed movie trailer narrator, RIP

Imagine a world... where film trailers have emerged as their own art form. Where today, we learn that one of the greats of that genre has passed on. Hal Douglas, the familiar narrator of thousands of Hollywood trailers, has died of pancreatic cancer. He was 89 years old. (New York Times)

Captain America, then and now

"When Captain America throws his mighty shield, all those who chose to oppose his shield must yield."

Elliot The Bull music video; incredible stop motion animation

Animated by Samuel Lewis for Elliot The Bull's single, Colorblind.

True Detective ends its first season as it began: with two indelible performances [Recap: season 1, episode 8]

Kevin McFarland reviews the finale of HBO’s crime drama “True Detective,” starring Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson. If you’re new to the show, start with our introduction here. This post contains spoilers.

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Community: Greendale points to fictional dystopians to comment on social media apps [s5e8]


Never let it be said that Community goes halfway in its genre homage episodes. “App Development And Condiments” is a full-on dystopian meltdown that pitches Greendale into a disastrous state of rigid social classes determined by an upstart social network. It’s not as airtight as some of the show’s other clear homage episodes, nor is it as coherent as some of the more sprawling, cafeteria-homage episodes (like the David Fincher Ass-Crack Bandit episode earlier this season), but at least it has a kernel of a clear message. If I’m placing this on my scale of Community styles, this is a batshit insane, throw-everything-at-the-wall stylistic extravaganza, but not everything sticks.

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Hannibal's terrifying gaze inward, in "Sakizuki" [s2e2]

Hannibal’s premiere hit the ground running, but it felt like half of an episode. We barely even met the “artist” behind the giant corpse-eye mural, because there was so much fallout from Will’s incarceration.

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Texas Chain Saw Massacre, 40 years old and newly restored

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On its 40th anniversary, iconic splatterpunk film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre has been restored with a new 4K transfer from the original 16mm film shot by director Tobe Hooper in 1974. A production of Dark Sky Films, the new print premieres at SXSW on Monday, March 10 with wide theatrical release over the summer.

"I haven't seen The Texas Chain Saw Massacre on the big screen for many, many years," Hooper says. "This 40th anniversary restoration is absolutely the best the film has ever looked. The color and clarity is spectacular, displaying visual details in the film that were never before perceptible. The newly remastered 7.1 soundtrack breathes new life and energy into the film. I am very much looking forward to audiences experiencing this film as they never have before".

Leatherface had no comment.

The return of Hannibal Lecter

Mikkelsen’s civilized serial killer returns in “Kaiseki,” the eye-opening premiere to season two of Hannibal. Theresa DeLucci takes a bite out of the show’s mad metaphors.

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The Godfather locations, then and now

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Scouting New York visited the New York filming locations of The Godfather (1972) to see how they look today. Top, Don Corleone gunned down outside Genco (128 Mott Street), and that location now. "The New York Filming Locations of The Godfather, Then and Now" (via Laughing Squid)

'After You’ve Gone' sets everything up for True Detective finale [TV recap: season 1, episode 7]

Kevin McFarland reviews episode 7 in season 1 of HBO’s crime drama “True Detective,” starring Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson. If you’re new to the show, start with our introduction here. This post contains spoilers.

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