Cthul-aid! OH YEAH!


BeastWreck's CTHUL-AID illo is just one of many fabulous monstrous designs for sale on Society 6, available as prints/laptop bags/shirts/etc.

Read the rest

Marvelous grotesques from Domenico Gnoli's Modern Bestiary


These illustrations are from Domenico Gnoli's 1968 title Bestiario Moderno (Modern Bestiary), an "incredible collection of pen and ink illustrations that are intricately detailed and nothing short of amazing." The book appears to be out-of-print, which is a damned shame.

Read the rest

Monsters of Rock from Jason Edmiston


Best part of Comic-Con is checking in with my favorite artists and seeing what they've been up to. Jason Edmiston is a regular on Boing Boing -- a virtuoso of the grotesque monster illustration, who may be best known for his brilliant Cereal Monsters. Yesterday at his booth, I was treated to a look at his Basil Wolverton-esque "Monsters of Rock" posters, which can be had in limited edition prints from Etsy at $40 per. Click on a poster to go to its Etsy page.

Read the rest

Creature from the Black Lagoon as outlaw biker tee


Spotted at Comic-Con: Ben Von Strawn's "The Creatcha" tees, which sport a version of the Creature from the Black Lagoon in biker drag and a coal-scuttle helmet.

Ben Von Strawn The Creatcha T-Shirt

Frankenstein rat-racer tee glows in the dark


Spotted at Comic-Con: Captainyolk's Big-Daddy-Roth-alike Frankstein-in-a-rat-racer tee. Glows in the dark! $25 on Etsy.

Frankenstein Hot Rod Glow in the Dark Tee Shirt

Famous Monsters of Filmland tees


Spotted today at San Diego Comic-Con, the amazing line of t-shirts inspired by covers of Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine. Took every ounce of willpower not to walk out with a double-armload of these.

Apparel | Captain Company

Monsters and Legends: kids' monster book now in the USA!


Back in April, I reviewed Monsters and Legends, a wonderful illustrated kids' reference book from London's Flying Eye Books. At the time, it was only available in the UK, but now Americans can get it too! Here's my original review:

Monsters and Legends is part of the fabulous debut lineup of titles from Flying Eye, a kids' imprint spun out of London's NoBrow (they're the publishers of recently reviewed books like Welcome to Your Awesome Robot and Akissi). The book, written by Davide Cali and illustrated by Garbiella Giandelli, is a fascinating reference work for kids 7 and up about the curious origins of the monsters of the popular imagination. The book recounts the odd history of stories of mermaids, chupacabras, cyclopses, dragons, the Loch Ness Monster, and other cryptozoology favorites. It's a great balance between fascination with monsters and lore and a skeptical inquiry into how widespread beliefs can be overturned by evidence and rational inquire -- a real "magic of reality" book.


The illustrations in this book represent a range of engaging styles, and they bring it to life for even younger readers. My five year old and I spent several bedtimes on this, flipping through the pages, and stopping when a picture caught her eye. I had to interpret the text for her -- the language was often over her head -- but the stories absolutely grabbed her and it's become a family favorite.

As a one-time monster kid who's doing his best to raise another one, this one gets my unreserved stamp of approval.

MONSTERS AND LEGENDS [Flying Eye]

Monsters and Legends [Amazon]

Beast Academy: grade three math textbooks in monster comics form


Beast Academy is a set of grade three math textbooks and practice books structured as comic books about monsters. The books are "aligned to the common core state standards for grade three," if that matters to you. What's more significant is that they're actually really good math textbooks that introduce their subjects in a clear and easy-to-follow fashion, carefully linking each concept to the last; and the exercises are lively, fun, and built around stories that dovetail smoothly into puzzles, games, and other ways of putting the knowledge into practice. The monsters are great, too -- wonderful illustrations from Erich Owen, whose work you may recognize from the graphic novel adaptation of my story I, Robot.

Beast Academy 8-book set

Read the rest

Monster money!


Google Translate says that the caption on this image is Japanese for "Bill of surprised frontispiece monster world." I can't really hazard any guesses beyond that, but hey, monster money!

『びっくり口絵 怪物世界のお札』 (via Crazy Abalone)

Monsters and Legends: kids' reference book on the origin of monsters


Monsters and Legends is part of the fabulous debut lineup of titles from Flying Eye, a kids' imprint spun out of London's NoBrow (they're the publishers of recently reviewed books like Welcome to Your Awesome Robot and Akissi). The book, written by Davide Cali and illustrated by Garbiella Giandelli, is a fascinating reference work for kids 7 and up about the curious origins of the monsters of the popular imagination. The book recounts the odd history of stories of mermaids, chupacabras, cyclopses, dragons, the Loch Ness Monster, and other cryptozoology favorites. It's a great balance between fascination with monsters and lore and a skeptical inquiry into how widespread beliefs can be overturned by evidence and rational inquiry -- a real "magic of reality" book.


The illustrations in this book represent a range of engaging styles, and they bring it to life for even younger readers. My five year old and I spent several bedtimes on this, flipping through the pages, and stopping when a picture caught her eye. I had to interpret the text for her -- the language was often over her head -- but the stories absolutely grabbed her and it's become a family favorite.

As with other Flying Eye titles, this one is out in the UK right now and coming to the US on June 11 (here's a pre-order link). As a one-time monster kid who's doing his best to raise another one, this one gets my unreserved stamp of approval.

MONSTERS AND LEGENDS [Flying Eye]

Monsters and Legends [Amazon UK]

More Post-It Monsters


I picked up John Kenn Mortensen's More Post-It Monsters at a comic-show in London and it's terrific. Mortensen draws beautiful and grotesque line-art monsters on yellow sticky notes, and, as with the first collection of these, Sticky Monsters, More Post-It Monsters reproduces them with a minimum of text (apart from a brief and charming intro from China Mieville) and other distractions. It's just about 80 pages' worth of Gorey-esque illustrations that'll excite and reward your brain's monster-center.

John Kenn Mortensen: More Post-It Monsters

Read the rest

Travis Louie's monsters in Seattle

NewImageSeattle's legendary Roq La Rue Gallery is moving from its longtime Belltown location to a beautiful new space in Pioneer Square! Congratulations, Kirsten! This month is your last chance to visit the current digs, and there's quite a send-off show opening tonight. Monster keeper Travis Louie has a new solo exhibit of paintings hanging until May 4! "Monsters On Their Day Off" is a series of portraits of Louie's elegant beasts during their down time. The paintings are also viewable online. Above, Baxter:

Baxter worked as a butler for an eccentric oil baron in 1898. His father was a Krampus who emigrated from Bavaria in the 1860's and married a school teacher from Piscataway, New Jersey. Baxter grew up to be erudite and purposeful. he had a fascination with the wonders of the world particularly insects. During the warmer months on his days off he would wander through the town marveling at nature.

Travis Louie "Monsters On Their Day Off"

What makes monsters real

Peter Stanford reviews Matt Kaplan's new book, an investigation into what's so intriguing about spooky, scary beasties of the night: Medusa's Gaze and Vampire's Bite: the Science of Monsters.

What he has grasped is that, however much the rational and sane majority airily dismiss tales of fire-breathing dragons, strange creatures from outer space or beasts that inhabit the depths, there is still buried in most of us that reflex that can't help, on a dark night, walking along a lonely country lane, wondering, “What if there’s something out there?” And when we do, the collective cultural baggage of these tales of ghosts, ghouls and griffins is usually sufficient to make us put our hands over our eyes to block out what may just be lurking out there. But, then, we still peep.

Action figures depicting presidents as Famous Monsters of Filmland


Heroes in Action have a line of Presidential Monster action figures, including JFK as the Phantom of the White House, Mitt Romney Ronald Reagan as The Ronmy, GW Bush as Zombush, Bill Clinton as Wolf Bill, Richard Nixon as Monster from the Watergate Lagoon (my favorite of the bunch), Barack Obama as Baracula, and Abe Lincoln as Lincolnstein. They're $30 each or $165 for the set.

Heroes in Action Toys - Presidential Monsters (via Super Punch)

Release the kraken!

What do you need to catch a giant squid? At The Verge, Arikia Millikan goes behind-the-scenes on the recent, successful expedition to capture the kraken on video for the first time.