Kickstarting Kudzilla: a kudzu-covered monster roadside attraction

Chris Lindland (who founded the awesome Betabrand writes, "I went to college at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with my partner in kudzu crime, Anthony Jaffe, who now lives in Atlanta. For years, we've talked about building a giant monument to Godzilla out of the famed Vine That Ate The South. While everyone knows what Godzilla is, for the most part only Southerners are truly familiar with kudzu. It's an invasive vine that grows up to a foot a day and fully envelopes trees, telephone poles, and buildings -- making them look like giant, leafy monsters.

"So we naturally thought, "Why not crowdfund an enormous, Godzilla-like structure and allow it to be covered in Kudzu." The result: Kudzilla.

Read the rest

Monster portraits made from candy mosaics: TOTALLY SWEET!

Eric writes, "I am Eric Millikin and I am an experimental artist from Detroit who has created a series of portraits of monsters, each built out of Halloween candy. I call this series 'Totally Sweet.' So far, this series includes everything from classic monsters like The Bride of Frankenstein to modern killers from slasher movies. And I've been taking requests; one of my favorites has been Gort, the alien killer robot from the 1950s sci-fi classic, 'The Day the Earth Stood Still.'"

Read the rest

Mad Monster Party: the comic book


Zack sez, "Is there another holiday movie more underrated than the Harvey Kurtzman-scripted 1967 Rankin-Bass stop-motion classic MAD MONSTER PARTY? If you haven't experienced it yet, sample this adaptation by Dell (no artist credits are given, though it was adapted from Kurtzman's screenplay). Nothing can compare to the film, but it still retains some of the original's charm. The adaptation is in two parts (Part 2 is here)

Read the rest

Pop art zombie makeup


Sssamanthaa created this wonderful "Pop Art Zombie" makeup job.

Read the rest

Monster and Chips: fun, gross-out chapter books


Monster and Chips is a compulsively readable, delightfully illustrated series of novels for young readers that are full of good-natured gross-out humor and suspenseful scenarios. Joe stumbles into Fuzzby Bixington's Monster Diner one day while running away from the school bully and is adopted as a general dogsbody and sous-chef. In volume one, Monster and Chips, Joe discovers all manner of monstrous culinary secrets that he and his friends -- Barry, a wisecracking, tentacled, four-eyed "cat"; and Twig, a young, sweet tree-monster -- use to help Fuzzby compete on Monsterchef, where he faces a villainous, cheating horror of a monster. In volume two, Night of the Living Bread, a series of short episodes culminate with Fuzzy, Joe and friends cooking the Pizza of Ultimate Darkness to feed the dread Night-Mayor at his secretive annual feast.

Read the rest

Cthul-aid! OH YEAH!


BeastWreck's CTHUL-AID illo is just one of many fabulous monstrous designs for sale on Society 6, available as prints/laptop bags/shirts/etc.

Read the rest

Marvelous grotesques from Domenico Gnoli's Modern Bestiary


These illustrations are from Domenico Gnoli's 1968 title Bestiario Moderno (Modern Bestiary), an "incredible collection of pen and ink illustrations that are intricately detailed and nothing short of amazing." The book appears to be out-of-print, which is a damned shame.

Read the rest

Monsters of Rock from Jason Edmiston


Best part of Comic-Con is checking in with my favorite artists and seeing what they've been up to. Jason Edmiston is a regular on Boing Boing -- a virtuoso of the grotesque monster illustration, who may be best known for his brilliant Cereal Monsters. Yesterday at his booth, I was treated to a look at his Basil Wolverton-esque "Monsters of Rock" posters, which can be had in limited edition prints from Etsy at $40 per. Click on a poster to go to its Etsy page.

Read the rest

Creature from the Black Lagoon as outlaw biker tee


Spotted at Comic-Con: Ben Von Strawn's "The Creatcha" tees, which sport a version of the Creature from the Black Lagoon in biker drag and a coal-scuttle helmet.

Ben Von Strawn The Creatcha T-Shirt

Frankenstein rat-racer tee glows in the dark


Spotted at Comic-Con: Captainyolk's Big-Daddy-Roth-alike Frankstein-in-a-rat-racer tee. Glows in the dark! $25 on Etsy.

Frankenstein Hot Rod Glow in the Dark Tee Shirt

Famous Monsters of Filmland tees


Spotted today at San Diego Comic-Con, the amazing line of t-shirts inspired by covers of Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine. Took every ounce of willpower not to walk out with a double-armload of these.

Apparel | Captain Company

Monsters and Legends: kids' monster book now in the USA!


Back in April, I reviewed Monsters and Legends, a wonderful illustrated kids' reference book from London's Flying Eye Books. At the time, it was only available in the UK, but now Americans can get it too! Here's my original review:

Monsters and Legends is part of the fabulous debut lineup of titles from Flying Eye, a kids' imprint spun out of London's NoBrow (they're the publishers of recently reviewed books like Welcome to Your Awesome Robot and Akissi). The book, written by Davide Cali and illustrated by Garbiella Giandelli, is a fascinating reference work for kids 7 and up about the curious origins of the monsters of the popular imagination. The book recounts the odd history of stories of mermaids, chupacabras, cyclopses, dragons, the Loch Ness Monster, and other cryptozoology favorites. It's a great balance between fascination with monsters and lore and a skeptical inquiry into how widespread beliefs can be overturned by evidence and rational inquire -- a real "magic of reality" book.


The illustrations in this book represent a range of engaging styles, and they bring it to life for even younger readers. My five year old and I spent several bedtimes on this, flipping through the pages, and stopping when a picture caught her eye. I had to interpret the text for her -- the language was often over her head -- but the stories absolutely grabbed her and it's become a family favorite.

As a one-time monster kid who's doing his best to raise another one, this one gets my unreserved stamp of approval.

MONSTERS AND LEGENDS [Flying Eye]

Monsters and Legends [Amazon]

Beast Academy: grade three math textbooks in monster comics form


Beast Academy is a set of grade three math textbooks and practice books structured as comic books about monsters. The books are "aligned to the common core state standards for grade three," if that matters to you. What's more significant is that they're actually really good math textbooks that introduce their subjects in a clear and easy-to-follow fashion, carefully linking each concept to the last; and the exercises are lively, fun, and built around stories that dovetail smoothly into puzzles, games, and other ways of putting the knowledge into practice. The monsters are great, too -- wonderful illustrations from Erich Owen, whose work you may recognize from the graphic novel adaptation of my story I, Robot.

Beast Academy 8-book set

Read the rest

Monster money!


Google Translate says that the caption on this image is Japanese for "Bill of surprised frontispiece monster world." I can't really hazard any guesses beyond that, but hey, monster money!

『びっくり口絵 怪物世界のお札』 (via Crazy Abalone)

Monsters and Legends: kids' reference book on the origin of monsters


Monsters and Legends is part of the fabulous debut lineup of titles from Flying Eye, a kids' imprint spun out of London's NoBrow (they're the publishers of recently reviewed books like Welcome to Your Awesome Robot and Akissi). The book, written by Davide Cali and illustrated by Garbiella Giandelli, is a fascinating reference work for kids 7 and up about the curious origins of the monsters of the popular imagination. The book recounts the odd history of stories of mermaids, chupacabras, cyclopses, dragons, the Loch Ness Monster, and other cryptozoology favorites. It's a great balance between fascination with monsters and lore and a skeptical inquiry into how widespread beliefs can be overturned by evidence and rational inquiry -- a real "magic of reality" book.


The illustrations in this book represent a range of engaging styles, and they bring it to life for even younger readers. My five year old and I spent several bedtimes on this, flipping through the pages, and stopping when a picture caught her eye. I had to interpret the text for her -- the language was often over her head -- but the stories absolutely grabbed her and it's become a family favorite.

As with other Flying Eye titles, this one is out in the UK right now and coming to the US on June 11 (here's a pre-order link). As a one-time monster kid who's doing his best to raise another one, this one gets my unreserved stamp of approval.

MONSTERS AND LEGENDS [Flying Eye]

Monsters and Legends [Amazon UK]