Affecting sculpture about our relationship to technology


Soheyl Bastami's Extreme: an Iranian sculptor's beautiful and trenchant take on our relationship to technology.

(via Super Punch)

Life-sized nude sculpture made from typewriter parts


Typewriter assemblage scluptor Jeremy Mayer writes, "I just finished my latest big sculpture. Titled Nude VI (Theia), it stands over 7 feet, 4 inches (224cm) tall, and will be suspended on thin cables high above the offices of Oculusvr in Los Angeles. She took a little over a year and about 1100 hours of work. Made in Oakland."

I've featured a lot of Jeremy's work in the past and even own one of his pieces (I wish I could afford more!).

Nude VI (Theia) - Jeremy Mayer

(Thanks Jeremy!)

Hair Highway: sculptures made from human hair plastic

London's Studio Swine has created a beautiful and provocative collection of art-pieces made from human hair in resin.

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Just look at this well-balanced banana


Just look at it.

3D printable version of Marcel Duchamp's rare Art Deco chess-set


Marcel Duchamp's rare chess-set has been recreated as freely downloadable 3D print-files on Thingiverse, where the community is actively remixing them.

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Magnificent contraption: vacuum-cleaner/foam-ball particle accelerator

Niklas Roy's DIY particle accelerator contraption is based on vacuum-cleaner-powered pneumatic tube technology, installed in a beautiful glass pavilion located in the middle of a roundabout in Groningen, The Netherlands.

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Man stuck in giant stone vagina

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Firefighters had to rescue a young man from a giant vagina (sculpture) outside a microbiology building at Germany's Tübingen University. Fernando de la Jara's sculpture is titled "Chacán-Pi" referring to a Quechuan word that means a "place where the action of water has tunneled through a large rock or a mountain, also designates the act of lovemaking," according to the artist. The sculpture was not damaged. From NY Mag:

Basically, de la Jara intended for people to check out the sculpture up close. "The principal part of the work isn't outside."

So the American bro might not have been totally off-base, a small consolation for the sheer scale of his embarrassment. "It's participatory art," de la Jara said. "It should be entered." It's just that, since the sculpture was installed in 2001, no one's actually gotten stuck. "I believe [he got caught] because he had a lack of coordination" de la Jara said. "Or maybe it was a lack of sensibility."

Entangled: hearts' tentacles entwined


Kate MacDowell's Entangled is a beautiful, tentacly porcelain sculpture depicting two hearts whose questing tentacles have entwined. (via JWZ)

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Stone busts carved from stacked books


Sculptor Long-Bin Chen creates art out of recycled books and magazines; his current show, at Charleston's Halsey, features a series of pieces that appear to be solid sculptures, but which are actually carved stacks of books, painted and surfaced on one side. He has recently completed a set of enormous Buddha heads carved from stacks of phone books. As the Halsey explains, "The Buddha sculptures represent the missing heads of many ancient Buddha figures that have been looted from Asia and sold to Western museums and collectors. Since colonial times, Westerners have taken heads from the Buddha statues in Asia and brought them back to the West. While one finds so many Buddha heads in Western museums and galleries, an equal number of Buddha bodies in Asia are headless. When carved into phone books, Chen's Buddha heads contain the names and numbers of millions of residents."

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Fluorescent, pissing Lenin statue


A fluorescent statue of a urinating VI Lenin has been erected in Nowa Huta, a town built by the old Stalinist regime. The Soviet-era Lenin that stood in the spot was subjected to multiple unsuccessful attempts by activists to blow it up. The new statue, "Fountain of the Future," is a temporary installation that is meant to spur debate about what statue should be permanently installed in its place.

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Sculptures made from repeating human bone motifs


Czech artist Monika Horčicová makes beautiful, haunting sculptures comprised of repeated, 3D-printed human bones. They remind me of the Capela dos Ossos in Portugal, whose walls and vaults are lined with bones of 5,000 parishoners from nearby churches. There's something about Czech artists and bones, it seems -- witness Alice, Jan Svankmajer's classic taxidermy adaptation of Alice in Wonderland.

PRÁCE / WORKS | Monika Horčicová (via Kadrey)

Automata clock-monster with moving eyes

Automata builder Dug North sez, "I combined my love of clocks with my affinity for wooden monsters to create this monster clock with moving eyes. The monster is made of basswood, ebony, and tagua nut. A small weight-driven German clock movement powers the eyes and clock. It is titled simply 'Monster Clock No. 1,' which implies I may be making more of these. Please do!

Moving-eyed monster clock by Dug North now on display

Incredible movie character sculptures

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Bobby Causey makes incredibly realistic sculptures of movie characters, some life-size, and some thumb-size. More below. (via Laughing Squid)

Christopher reeve sculpture by bobbyc1225 d32lvz4

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AT-AT made from old skateboards


Derek Keenan's AT-AT made from old skateboards is part of the Deathstar Blues show at Denver's Black Book Gallery. It sells for $2,000.

Deathstar Blues (via Super Punch)

Real-world wireframes: sculpture from Louise Wilson


Another find from the Contemporary Craft Festival: the beautiful and eerie everyday objects turned into wireframes by Louise Wilson, whose pieces were as much fun to look at and handle in person as you'd imagine from these photos. They were surprisingly robust, too.

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