Students' phallic prank as seen from a satellite

Students at Mackie Academy secondary school in Aberdeenshire, Scotland created a piece of high art on the playing field. While the act occurred last year, its documentation -- which was actually the real prank -- apparently lives on in Google Earth.

“I’m sure there is lots of penises drawn in lots of places around the school and many other schools across the country, but this really is impressive," said one former student.

(The Scottish Sun)

Of course, they weren't the first students to play this particular, er, long game. For example: "Suspected high school prank goes unnoticed by APS for years" Read the rest

Loch Ness Monster seen on Google Earth

Lisa Stout of Bellvue, Ohio was exploring Loch Ness via Google Earth when she found this fantastic shot of Nessie. The Scottish cryptid has previously been spotted on Google Earth but this a much more compelling image. From the Official Loch Ness Monster Sightings Registry:

"I had been searching for Nessie on and off for the past few weeks, spending an hour or so a week on Google Earth as well as other places I like to visit in the app. I had seen some of the latest Nessie sightings and thought that I can definitely find a better image of her than that which I used for motivation to challenge myself to find her. On the 13th at 9.45am, I had got my daughter off to school and began to search for Nessie when I noticed a cluster of pictures taken by an Underwater Earth Contributor all in one area near the Loch Ness Highland Resort in Fort Augustus. I noticed what I believe may be the creature known as Nessie – or at the very least what makes up for most of the accounts of Nessie sightings that residents/tourists are seeing and reporting.”

(via Deadline)

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Trippy film flashes 2,000 aerial shots of football fields in three minutes

Playground compiles 2,000 Google Earth images of American football fields, then plays them alphabetically at a speed where they become hypnotic. Read the rest

UFO found in Google Earth image of Antarctica

A flying saucer was spotted on a Google Earth image near the South Pole in Antarctica. You can see it right here. Mysterious Universe claims that "melting ice could have formed a round depression as it sank into the surrounding snow, or wind could have created a small whirlwind effect as it blew into alcoves in the rock wall." Screw that though. I want to believe.

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Disneyland's show-buildings induce charming glitches in Google Earth

Dan Howland writes, "Screengrabs that made me laugh from Google (Happiest Place on) Earth. It does pretty well with conventional architecture, but it freaked out on the Haunted Mansion's cupola and chimblies, and Dumbo just looks like a Jello salad."

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Google Earth now available in VR

A virtual reality version of Google Earth is now available on Steam for the HTC Vive. Viewers can walk around, or fly, or browse any number of recorded locations. Read the rest

Income inequality can be seen from space

How? It's surprisingly simple. Turns out, demand for trees in neighborhoods behaves a lot like a luxury item, as opposed to a basic necessity.

Tim De Chant at The Per Square Mile blog wrote about research on this a couple of weeks ago. Then, he went out and found examples, using images from Google Earth. Read the rest

Ads visible from space

Fifty years of weather have worn it down, but this image depicts the first advertisement visible from space, the Readymix logo. KFC tried to claim in 2006 that their one square mile Colonel Sanders portrait in Nevada was the "world's first brand visible from outer space", but the bloggers at Google Sightseeing dispelled that myth. NPR has a slideshow of "astrotisements" from the Google Sightseeing site. "What On Earth? Art And Ads That Can Be Seen From Space" Read the rest