'Killer Queen Black': like multiplayer 'Joust'

I have been enjoying Killer Queen Black.

I started playing KQB in beta, on the recommendation of some friends who played the arcade version regularly in a bar. This game is a hoot!

In addition to a 'Military' win where you beat up the other team with flying creatures that operate a heck of a lot like the awesome ostrich riders in Joust, you can also win by collecting berries ("Economic") or racing a snail across a finish line ("Badass".)

Three-player teams take on three-player teams, or you can just play vs the AI.

Available for Xbox One, Switch and PC via Steam. Read the rest

How a 'Tornado Omelette' is cooked

A South Korean street food treat.

I could watch this 'making of' video on loop forever. Read the rest

Watch: Wild hyperreal Hot Wheels and Matchbox car race video complete with announcers

I prefer this to the real thing. The cartoon fun is infectious and, well, nobody dies.

More thrills at 3Dbotmaker, home to 1:64 Diecast Sports Action Racing!

(Jalopnik) Read the rest

Swiss gruyere named world’s best cheese at global competition

What's the world's best cheese? A gruyere from Switzerland, selected from a record-breaking number of entries from 26 countries in the 2020 World Championship Cheese Contest in Wisconsin. Read the rest

Largest technical dairy competition in world opens in Wisconsin

Coronavirus fears can't stop the fromage

In Wisconsin today, the world's largest technical cheese, butter and yogurt competition kicked off with a record 3,667 entries from 26 nations. Read the rest

Brave try at world sparkler record fails on technicality in Wyoming

In Wyoming, an attempt to break the world record for the most sparklers lit at one time failed on a technicality. Bummer. Read the rest

Cool retro console lets you play Conway's Game of Life

Love Hultén, who makes retrofuturistic game consoles, built this thing called an EvoBoxx, which lets you play mathematician John Horton Conway's Game of Life, a cellular automaton he devised in 1970. "The game is a zero-player game," writes Hultén, "meaning that its evolution is determined by its initial state, requiring no further input. One interacts with the Game of Life by creating an initial configuration and observing how it evolves, or, for advanced players, by creating patterns with particular properties."

If you don't have an EvoBoxx, you can play The Game of Life here.

Image: Love Hultén Read the rest

'My hobby is designing and building unique arcade games from scratch.'

This is a really cool homebuilt arcade game project. Read the rest

The ancient world's greatest board games

Ludus Latrunculorum. Senet. Chaturanga. And don't forget Hnefatafl. These were just some of the board games that ancient people were into thousands of years ago. Over at Smithsonian, Meilan Solly explains "The Best Board Games of the Ancient World." From the magazine:

The rules of Mehen remain unclear, as the game faded from popularity following the decline of Egypt’s Old Kingdom and is sparsely represented in the archaeological record.

Writing in 1990, Egyptologist Peter A. Piccione explained, “Based upon what we know of this game ... the feline game pieces moved in a spiral along the squares, apparently, from the tail on the outside to the head of the serpent at the center.” The spherical, marble-like tokens may have been similarly rolled through the “longer spiralling grooves.”

In Patolli, a gambling game invented by the early inhabitants of Mesoamerica, players raced to move pebbles from one end of a cross-shaped track to the other. Drilled beans used as dice dictated gameplay, but the exact rules of “entry and movement” remain unknown, as Parlett notes in the Oxford History of Board Games.

Among the Aztecs, Patolli held unusually high stakes, with participants wagering not just physical goods or currency, but their own lives. As Diego Durán, a Dominican friar who authored a 16th-century tome on Aztec history and culture, explained, “At this and other games the Indians not only would gamble themselves into slavery, but even came to be legally put to death as human sacrifices.”

Images from top down: "Senet from the Brooklyn Museum, Charles Edwin Wilbour Fund; "Mehen" by Anagoria (CC BY 3.0 Read the rest

I'm loving this Reggae, Dub, Ska and Rocksteady internet radio station

LISTEN: 'Heavyweight Reggae.' Yep, the name is right, and the channel delivers. Read the rest

LEGO step-by-step build: Ultimate Millennium Falcon

Oh this is gloriously satisfying. Read the rest

First 'baked in space' cookies: 2 hours at 325º in zero-g oven

SPOILER: Nobody got baked. Not that kind of space cookies. Sorry.

“How do they taste? No one knows.” Read the rest

Wonderful video: blowtorch + hair dryer = popcorn

Filmmakers Zita Bernet and Rafael Sommerhalder, aka CRICTOR, created this delightful short as a cinematic holiday card. Read the rest

The Pursuit of Capyness is a capybaras-only coloring book

The Pursuit of Capyness [Amazon] is a coloring book featuring capybaras, the large and eminently peaceable rodents often observed just chilling, occasionally in hot tubs. The book is by psychiatrist John Terry, who knows what you need right now. Which is capybaras. To color in.

There are more than 50 within, with lots of capybara facts, and a range of complexity to make it fun for kids and adults alike. Here's an inteview with Terry:

Capybaras, in general, but especially on the internet, are associated with being very tolerant. There are all those photos of other animals hanging out and sitting on them. Their reputation is that they get along with everyone, making the emissaries of this really nice message.

There was a day that was a particularly rough day in the world of news, and a lot of negativity online. In response to it all, I was compelled to post this photo of a capybara stretching, and the response to the photo was just unbelievable. I didn’t really expect anyone to notice, but I suppose it was the distraction a lot of people needed because it gained so many likes and shares.

Moreover, it's for a good cause:

What are some examples of how funds from this book will be used? • Toward a free medical clinic that provides care to 200+ people every Saturday. The clinic was recently featured on national news • Book donations to mental health clinics and shelters; we are currently discussing donating 300+ books to children at a women and children’s shelter • Free services for the uninsured, underinsured, students, and impaired professionals • Consultation to nonprofits serving mental health and primary care causes • Education for health sciences students, pre-meds, and more, with the goal to improve access and investment in our communities in the long-term • During furloughs and disasters, we have seen federal employees and displaced people for free • International disaster relief (such as recent volunteering with the World Central Kitchen after hurricane Durian)

Read the rest

It's theoretically possible to beat Minecraft without picking up a single item

In this video, an astoundingly dedicated player demonstrates how to complete Minecraft without ever picking up an item. Read the rest

An escape room where you have to remove your booby-trapped pants before they explode

Pants//Off is a mobile escape room based on the concept that you're a secret agent who tried on cutting edge pants only to discover they've been sabotaged and rigged to explode. Can you get them off within 10 minutes?

After getting locked into the pants, the player has to solve all sorts of puzzles using the odd array of tools stuffed in their pockets.

Here's a glimpse of the action:

(Via Max Temkin.) Read the rest

Card Tricks: 'How To Flick a Card Boomerang' [VIDEO]

Here's a fun card trick video that shows you “How To Flick a Card Boomerang.” Read the rest

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