Boing Boing 

David Pescovitz

David Pescovitz is Boing Boing's co-editor/managing partner and leads Medium's creative studio. On Instagram, he's @pesco.

Brand new van wrapped to look like an old rustbucket

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A customer commissioned Glasgow, Scotland vehicle graphics company Clyde Wraps to make a 2014 Volkswagen van look like it had been devoured by rust. The vehicle is actually covered in beautifully designed vinyl stickers of corroded car parts.

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Blosom, the World's Tallest Cow, RIP

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Blosom, the world's tallest cow at 6'2" from hoof to withers, died in May at 13-years-old, according to Guinness World Records. Watch a touching tribute video below.

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Astonishing smokable blunt sculptures

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Highly creative blunt sculptures as seen on ValleyRecreational420's Instagram account.

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Flatworms inject sperm into their heads to self-fertilize

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When alone, a hermaphroditic flatworm is known to stab itself with its needle-tipped penis and inject sperm to self-impregnate. It's called "hypodermic insemination."

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Watch the first trailer for new Steve Jobs biopic

That's Michael Fassbender as Jobs and Seth Rogen as Woz. Directed by Michael Boyle and written by Aaron Sorkin based on Walter Isaacson's book. Due out October 9.

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Watch Colbert interview Eminem on public access TV

Yesterday, Stephen Colbert was the guest host on "Only in Monroe," a public access television show in Monroe, Michigan. His guest was Eminem.

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Incredible weather photos

4D8999AD-165D-4FCE-A6A853AC147E8657-1 The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association announced the winners of its "Weather in Focus" photo contest. Here are two of the absolutely marvelous honorees. Above, Brad Goddard captured this tornado in Traer, Iowa. Below, Ken William's photo of a "proton arc over Lake Superior." "NOAA photo contest winners announced" (via Scientific American)

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Courthouse closed due to "grenade" that was actually perfume

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The Hamilton County Courthouse in Cincinnati, Ohio was shut down yesterday when an object suspected to be a World War II "pineapple" grenade was found in a suitcase. Turns out, it was a bottle of perfume belonging to a homeless woman who was carrying all her belongings in the bag.

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School lockers painted as book spines

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A creative group of teachers at Mississippi's Biloxi Junior High are painting book spines on an entire hallway of unused old lockers at the school. Fantastic idea!

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WATCH: What is the resonant frequency of googly eyes?

433 Hz. Now you know.

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Watch this wonderful video celebrating colors!

Daniel and Katina Mercadentes' new short film "Colors" is a delightful piece of montage moviemaking. It's the feel-good film of the day!

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Today we gain a leap second. Why?

At 23:59:59 (UTC), time will "stop" as the National Institute of Standards and Technology in the US and other official timekeepers around the world add a second to our clocks. They last did this in 2012.

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Watch: montage of people in movies flipping the bird

To quote Jerry Seinfeld, "It seems like such an... arbitrary, ridiculous thing to just pick a finger and you show it to the person. It's a finger, what does it mean? Someone shows me one of their fingers and I'm supposed to feel bad."

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Crashed truck releases millions of bees on highway

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A trailer loaded with millions of bees in 400 hives overturned in Coeur D'Alene, Idaho on Sunday.

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The real state of neuromarketing

Remember the hype about neuromarketing, the use of brain imaging and other technologies to directly measure consumer preference or the effect of advertisements on our unconscious? In The Guardian, Vaughan "Mind Hacks" Bell looks at the latest in neuromarketing and breaks it down into "advertising fluff, serious research, and applied neuroscience." From The Guardian:

First, it’s important to realise that the concept of neuroscience is used in different ways in marketing. Sometimes, it’s just an empty ploy aimed at consumers – the equivalent of putting a bikini-clad body next to your product for people who believe they’re above the bikini ploy. A recent Porsche advert (video above) apparently showed a neuroscience experiment suggesting that the brain reacts in a similar way to driving their car and flying a fighter jet, but it was all glitter and no gold. The images were computer-generated, the measurements impossible, and the scientist an actor.

In complete contrast, neuromarketing is also a serious research area. This is a scientifically sound, genuinely interesting field in cognitive science, where the response to products and consumer decision-making is understood on the level of body and mind. This might involve looking at how familiar brand logos engage the memory systems in the brain, or examining whether the direction of eye gaze of people in ads affects how attention-grabbing they are, or testing whether the brain’s electrical activity varies when watching subtly different ads. Like most of cognitive neuroscience, the studies are abstract, ultra-focused and a long way from everyday experience.

Finally, there is the murky but profitably grey area of applied neuromarketing, which is done by commercial companies for big-name clients. Here, the pop-culture hype that allows brain-based nonsense in consumer adverts meets the abstract and difficult-to-apply results from neuromarketing science. The result is an intoxicating but largely ineffective mix that makes sharp but non-specialist executives pay millions in the hope of maximising their return on branding and advertising.

"The marketing industry has started using neuroscience, but the results are more glitter than gold" (via Mind Hacks)

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Live in Frank Sinatra's 1960s mountain hideout, now for sale

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For just under $4 million you can live in Frank Sinatra's Villa Maggio, a five acre home on a mountain above California's Palm Desert.

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