Boing Boing 

David Pescovitz

David Pescovitz is Boing Boing's co-editor. On Instagram, he's @pesco.

Father and son take same photo for 27 years

Quite moving, really.


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Watch this reporter scared stiff on live TV

Photobomber scares the wits out of a TV reporter in downtown Los Angeles.

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The mysterious Face on Mars was first spotted in 1959

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Comic master Jack Kirby showed us the mysterious "Face on Mars" decades before it was imaged by the Viking 1 orbiter in 1976 and ultimately became an iconic example of pareidolia or proof of an ancient civilization on the red planet.

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New DEA head: Marijuana "probably not" as dangerous as heroin

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Chuck Rosenberg, the new acting administrator of the US Drug Enforcement Administration: “If you want me to say that marijuana’s not dangerous, I’m not going to say that because I think it is. Do I think it’s as dangerous as heroin?

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Watch an orangutan kiss a pregnant woman's belly

A lovely orangutan kissed this 37-week pregnant woman's belly through the glass at England's Colchester Zoo. The woman's partner Jay Clarke writes

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Watch this parrot sing "Everything is Awesome" and other tunes

Amazon parrot singing sensation Princess Yellowfeather resides at the Birds on Safari store in Stuart, Florida.

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Suspected robber wore "Crime Pays" t-shirt

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This gentleman dressed for the occasion of robbing a Baltimore pizza shop, wearing a "Crime Pays" t-shirt. It didn't though.

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A fucking interesting history of swearing on television!

I distinctly remember my glee as an 8-year-old watching Hawkeye say "Son of a bitch" on M*A*S*H in 1979, the first time that phrase was used on US television.

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X-Files was inspired by Chris Carter's observation of alien abductees' hypnosis

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In the early 1990s, Harvard psychiatrist John Mack studied hundreds of people who claimed to have been abducted by aliens and wrote multiple books about his research. He invited Chris Carter to sit in on one of Mack's regression hypnosis session with a self-proclaimed abductee, an experience that Carter says informed his vision for the X-Files.

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See Lego robot controlled by DIY exosuit

Danny Benedettelli built a Lego NXT humanoid robot that he controls with a sensor-laden exosuit, known as a "waldo." For example, when he moves his arms, so does the robot.

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Treasure hunters find $1 million in 1715 shipwreck

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Treasure hunters on a boat called the Aarrr Booty (seriously) found more than $1 million in gold coins from a 1715 shipwreck off the Florida coast. Apparently 20 percent of the booty goes to the state of Florida with the rest split between the historic shipwreck salvage company, 1715 Fleet-Queens Jewels LLC, and the subcontractors who recovered it. Half of the value is in just one coin, the so-called "Tricentennial Royal," meant to be delivered by the sunken fleet to Spanish King Phillip V.

"We're very respectful of the people who lost their lives in these shipwrecks. Unfortunately, they didn't make it," said Eric Schmitt who was on the team that found the gold. "We're able to continue their story on by continuing to bring these artifacts up."

"Sanford treasure hunters find $1M in gold off Florida's coast" (Orlando Sentinel)

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Dollhouse dungeon of BDSM miniatures

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Jenny Nightfall handcrafts BDSM dollhouse furniture and other macabre and goth decor miniatures, all available in her Etsy shop.

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Cooking rice in a coffee pot flushes out arsenic

Rice contains more of the carcinogen arsenic than other grains, but researchers at Queen’s University Belfast, UK found that cooking rice in a simple coffee pot removed about half the arsenic.

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Watch Bugs Bunny's first official cartoon from 75 years ago

Bugs Bunny turns 75 this year. His first "official" cartoon, seen here, is titled "A Wild Hare." Watch as Bugs is pursued by Elmer Fudd for the very first time.

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Photos of 1970s cheap motels

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In the 1973, subversive street artist Mike Mandel would take snapshots of the cheap motels where he stayed while traveling the country. He's posted the series on Flickr.

Working on the Baseball Photographer Trading Cards, traveling throughout the country, my girlfriend at the time, Alison Woolpert, and I would stay at some, shall we say, "economy" motels. We pulled into one in Texas on a wintry night and upon waking in the morning we realized that the sheets had not been changed after the visit of the previous motel guest. When we indignantly complained to the owner he shot us back a dirty look, "What do you expect for five dollars?" What we did expect was that no matter how shabby, beaten down or forgotten a motel might have become, there was always a motel postcard to be had: a memento of a one night stop, a promotional calling card, a free mailable note card to report back on the progress of a vacation to those back home. We would often take the back roads, sometimes follow old Route 66, and we would find those sad, forsaken motels that had been sucked almost out of existence by the newer corporate chains situated just off an exit ramp on the newer highways. We bypassed Motel 6, Travelodge and Howard Johnson's. After all, their postcards were usually just the same design with a different address. But we'd go out of our way to stop at every independent motel we could find in hopes of finding a postcard that would be even more banal than the one we had just found down the road.

This led, inevitably, to my photographing the motels themselves: interiors, pool sides and architecture. The project was always there whenever there was an opportunity to travel.

"70's Motels" (Flickr, via Dangerous Minds) screenshot

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Massive steel labyrinth

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Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh built this phenomenal steel labyrinth in Genk, Belgium at the C-mine arts center located on the site of a former coal mine. The 37.5 square meter maze has a kilometer of corridors.

A series of Boolean transformations create spaces and perspectives that reinterpret the traditional Labyrinth is a sculptural installation that focuses on the experience of space. These Boolean transformations convert the walk through the labyrinth into a sequence of spatial and sculptural experiences.

More at Deezen and Gijs Van Vaerenbergh. (via Juxtapoz)

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The Pogues have a new brand of whiskey

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Celtic punk bank The Pogues have launched a signature brand of Irish whiskey.

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