David Pescovitz

David Pescovitz is Boing Boing's co-editor/managing partner and Medium's head of creative services. On Instagram, he's @pesco.

The world's biggest boulder, UFOs, and the weird American West

Cabinet Magazine's Sasha Archibald cracks open the cultural mystique of the Mojave Desert's Giant Rock, considered the largest boulder in the world until 2000 when a chunk fell off.

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When Prince passed on "We Are The World"

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“He’d buy ice cream cones and wore sneakers,” says The Revolution keyboard player Wendy Coleman of Prince's Purple Rain days, “but the next minute, he’d be like ‘Hey, muthafuckas — ’ ” “He’d be fucking George Jefferson. And you’d be like, ‘Oh, God.’”

Over at Cuepoint, a great excerpt from Alan Light's forthcoming book, "Let's Go Crazy: Prince and the Making of Purple Rain."

Fabian Oefner's ferrofluidic cover for Guster's new album

Watch artist Fabian Oefner manipulating ferrofluid (magnetized liquid) and watercolors into a stunning psychedelic pattern that appears on the cover of alt.pop trio Guster's forthcoming album Evermotion.

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Video: Wondrous pygmy seahorses

KQED takes a Deep Look at pygmy seahorses, recently bred in captivity for the first time thanks to biologists at the California Academy of Sciences.

Transcontinental train ride about the future of food

This summer, my pal Sarah Smith at Institute for the Future took a ten-day transcontinental train trip to explore the future of food systems and wrote about it at National Geographic. In this piece, she profiles how the train's chefs, who considered the experience a “renegade culinary adventure," experimented with waste management, local sourcing, daily food practices, and decadence.

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Buildings as a font

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Art director Yousuke Ozawa created "Satellite Fonts" sourced from Google Earth images of letter-shaped buildings.

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LEGO jewelry

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Artist emiko oye has been making Lego jewelry since 2006.

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Black Dynamite, the instrumental versions

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Black Dynamite is Scott Sanders' 2009 action comedy that parodies 1970s blaxploitation films. Adrian Younge composed the psychedelic soul score that's as good as almost anything from the era it attempts to mimic, and now he's released a vinyl LP containing the instrumental versions of those killer cuts. Above, a documentary about the making of the score.

Isaac Asimov on creativity (1959)

In 1959, Isaac Asimov penned an essay about the nature of creativity that was never published until it was recently discovered in a file by an old friend.

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Rick Rubin looks back at the birth of hip hop

In this Rolling Stone interview, Def Jam founder and legendary producer Rick Rubin returns to the New York University dorm room where his career began in the early 1980s and reminisces about the birth of hip hop. For more on this history, might I suggest...

Stunning photos of San Francisco from the mid-20th century

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In the 1940s and 1950s, photographer Fred Lyon, now 89, magnificently captured the enticing noir decadence of San Francisco's Barbary Coast and the majesty of the rest of the city.

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Air puppets: their strange past and stranger future

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Over at Re:form, Sam Dean tells the fascinating history of air puppets, from their invention and 1990s golden era to the laws that banned them in urban locales to their rebirth as scarecrows.

Video: trick for drawing a perfect circle

by DaveHax.

Bryan Cranston responds to petition against Breaking Bad toys

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A mother in Fort Myers, Florida is leading a petition against Toys R Us selling Breaking Bad action figures, to which Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston responded perfectly:

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Comic sans typewriter

Artist Jesse England modified a typewriter to use a Comic Sans typeface. "If I'd made it in Helvetica people would've just observed it as a little design experiment," he says of his device, called the Sincerity Machine.