Be on the lookout for lizard men, South Carolina

The South Carolina Emergency Management Division warned eclipse watchers to be on the lookout for lizard men during the astronomical event.

"Obviously this was done very tongue-in-cheek," the middle-aged co-anchor solemnly explained to his young female colleague, who was until that point having fun with the segment.

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Man sues Heineken after finding two dead geckos in his beer can

George Toubbeh of Fountain Valley, California is suing Heineken and grocer The Kroger Co. after allegedly finding two dead geckos in his 24-ounce beer can back in 2015. Apparently they weren't supposed to be in there. From the Los Angeles Times:

According to the suit, Toubbeh noticed that the beer had a foul taste and he immediately began having abdominal pain and started vomiting. His daughter examined the can of beer and found two juvenile leopard geckos inside, the suit states. Geckos are a type of lizard.

“When discovered, the geckos had not been decomposed at all and were likely alive when the beer was poured and sealed into the cans in the bottling and/or canning facility,” the lawsuit states.

Heineken USA, a subsidiary of the Dutch brewing company, said in a statement that it “holds the safety and integrity of the products we import to the highest standards. We have investigated this isolated claim, and based on a number of factors, we confidently believe there is no merit to this claim.”

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Watch pink legless lizards, mysterious dongs of the desert

The dongs of the deep have nothing on the hearty Mexican mole lizard, aka dongs of the desert. Read the rest

Restaurant server drags giant lizard out by the tail

Working in an Australian restaurant has some region-specific duties, like dragging giant goannas off the patio dining area. Samia Lila was up to the task, earning the name Goanna Girl thanks to the viral video. Read the rest

This is why chameleons are so amazing

National Geograph explores the magic and mystery. Read the rest

Chameleon enjoys popping bubbles

Now someone is going to tell me that blowing bubbles near a chameleon is even worse than tickling a slow loris. Read the rest

Gecko Feet Inspire Wall-Climbing Gloves

I love it when nature inspires technology. A group of researchers has developed a glove that will allow humans to stick to and scale walls. This bit of amazingness is being modeled on the feet of geckos.

Unlike tree frogs, whose sticky toe pads give these amphibians the ability to cling to surfaces, gecko toes instead use friction created by microscopic hair-like structures called setae that hold up the animal's body weight.

This adaptation has been studied before, but so far physics and gravity have prevented any practical application for human use. We're simply too large and heavy. That has all changed now based on the work of Michael Elliot Hawks of Stanford University, who has developed a synthetic nano-fiber "setae" that can hold the weight of a human.

If and when these become available to the public, I'm definitely adding them to my wish list! Read the rest

Songs for Unusual Creatures: The Jesus Christ Lizard!

Michael Hearst launched his Songs For Unusual Creatures series on PBS Digital with an episode about the Jesus Christ Lizard. To accompany the story of this unusual creature, Michael wrote a tune for toy piano virtuoso Margaret Leng Tan! Michael says upcoming episodes will feature giant anteaters, magnapinna squids, tardigrades, glass frogs and sea pigs. For more of Michael's quirky brand of animal education, check out his book Unusual Creatures!

  Michael Hearst: Ode To Odd Instruments Kronos Quartet and the secret life of lemurs Read the rest

"Dragon" found in toilet

A shopper fled from an Asda supermarket in Edinburgh, Scotland, after being confronted by a "dragon" in the toilet—a creature that turned out to be a harmless monitor lizard. The lizard was rescued by animal welfare officers, who have named it Lulu. [The Scottish Sun] Read the rest

Re-grown lizard tails are cheap knock-offs of the original

A new study suggests that the "miracle" of re-growing a lost tail is less awesome than it might first appear. Sure, growing a new tail is cool and all. But the new tails have completely different anatomy — a tube of cartilage in place of vertebra, for instance — and are likely less flexible than the original model. (Via Brian Switek) Read the rest