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Vehicles as dinosaur skeletons


Jitish Kallat's 2008 piece "Aquasaurus" is a massive replica water truck made to look like a great prehistoric leviathan's skeleton, with great bowed ribs and enormous grinding teeth. It's part of a series of pieces that includes a bone motorcycle as well. His work is currently displayed on the India stage at Art Stage Singapore.

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Bugle alarm clock

Dominic Wilcox made this Bugle Alarm Clock for a window at Selfridges department store in London: "This prototype alarm clock is fitted with mini air compressor and thin vibrating rubber membrane to mimic lip vibrations."

4: Bugle Alarm Clock (via WTBW)

(Photo: Piotr Gaska)

World's largest K'Nex ball machine

K'Nex master Austron is constrcting the world's largest K'Nex ball machine. It's located at Bloomington, Minnesota's The Works museum. Austron says:

The machine stands 23.5 feet tall and 40 feet long, and contains over 100,000 pieces. It has 2 lifts, 3 motors, and 8 paths, including a 20 foot free-fall, an 8 foot tall big-ball-factory spiral, and a 60 foot long path which hangs from the ceiling. It takes 3 and a half minutes for a ball to climb to the top of the tallest tower.
"World's Largest K'nex Ball Machine - Teaser" (via Smithsonian)

Skull chair with brain ottoman


Vladi Rapaport's Skull Chair isn't the first one we've posted (cf: stacking chair; armchair), but it's my favorite so far. Love the subtlety of the skull, the eamesoid styling. Works especially well accompanied by the brain ottoman, made from leather and foam.

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Art of Math (and vice versa)

Sculptinggeometry

125 Tetras

Carlo Séquin is a computer science professor and sculptor at UC Berkeley who explores the art of math, and the math of art. He lives in a world of impossible objects and mind-bending shapes. Séquin’s research has contributed to the pervasiveness of digital cameras and to a revolution in computer chip design. He has developed groundbreaking computer-aided design (CAD) tools for circuit designers, mechanical engineers, and architects. Meanwhile, his huge abstract sculptures have been exhibited around the world. Visiting the computer science professor emeritus’s office is like taking a trip down the rabbit hole. Paradoxical forms are found in every corner, piled on shelves, poised on pedestals, hanging from the ceiling—optical illusions embodied in paper, cardboard, plastic, and metal.

I wrote about Séquin for the new issue of California magazine and you can read it here: Sculpting Geometry

Mecha-inspired casemod is a diorama depicting a gritty, gorgeous battlescene


Hiroto Ikeuchi is a Japanese casemodder who builds spectacular dioramas into PC towers, turning them into dystopian, futuristic military battlescenes. The Raku-Taro Tumblr has some flat-out gorgeous photos of an Ikeuchi project that's on display at the Ars Electronica center in Vienna Linz.

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Jaunty, Xmassy steampunk assemblage clock sculpture


The latest piece from Roger Wood's Klockwerks studio is this brave, fire-engine-red number that's just put me over the edge into a full-on bout of Christmas cheer.

Chihuahua skeleton made from typewriter parts


Assemblage sculptor Jeremy Mayer (who makes pieces out of deconstructed typewriters) teases us with a single shot of his latest piece: a chihuahua skeleton made from a disassembled, ancient writing-machine.

Chihuahua skeleton. Proper studio photos in a day or two.

Hammer nunchuks


Etsy seller Thesmartaleck made these hammer nunchuks out of "two hammers connected by found object nunchaku chain." It looks absolutely insane. $300.

Nunchaku hammer sculpture. (via Neatorama)

Dan Hillier piece as a 3D print


We're big fans of Dan Hillier's work around here -- the iconic, instantly recognizable grotesque Victorian collages. Now he's branched out into 3D printing. He writes: "I recently collaborated with a 3D printing design consultancy called Modla, for The Other Art Fair. Having met with their Creative Director, Jon Fidler, we worked on the creation of a 3D version of my work, 'Nothing Matters'. The piece is now available in a limited edition of 20." (Thanks, Dan!)

Hand-carved replica Campagnolo derailleur in walnut


Brook sez, "My cousin Max made this amazing replica out of walnut of a Campagnolo bicycle derailleur."

Aluminum castings of ant-nests


Anthill Art fills ant colonies with molten aluminum, creating massive, intricate castings of the architecture of the ants' nests. They're for sale on Ebay (surprisingly cheap, too), and they're spectacular.

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Alexander Calder, the artist who redefined sculpture

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Alexander Calder with [Paul] Matisse and a maquette of his last mobile. The maquette was enlarged 40 times in the final piece. (Source: Alexander Calder Special Collection Photo)

Alexander Calder's (1898-1976) father was Alexander Stirling Calder (1870-1945), who sculpted George Washington as President on the Washington Square Arch in New York. His grandfather, Alexander Milne Calder (1846 – 1923), sculpted the 37-foot tall William Penn statue, which stands atop Philadelphia City Hall. His great-grandfather was a tombstone carver.

So it's not surprising that Calder become a sculptor as well. But unlike his forebears, Calder was not interested in traditional sculpture. Instead, he invented a new art form -- kinetic sculpture -- the most famous of which were his "mobiles," (a word coined by his friend, the artist Marcel Duchamp). These delicately balanced sculptures consist of biomorphic shapes cut from sheet metal and painted in black, white, orange, red, white, yellow, and blue, and which hang from metal rods and wire.

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Giant cat sofa


From "Habitat," a 2010 installation in the Luchtbal district of Antwerp, UNFOLD's "Felis Domesticus." It's a 3.5 meter soft sculpture of a sleeping cat that visitors can lounge upon (finally, the lap-sitting tables are turned!). Pity this never went into production as a piece of furniture; it'd make a fabulous beanbag alternative.

Habitat: Felis Domesticus (via Geekologie)

HUDSON: a one-eyed junkbot


From San Diego's Dan Jones (aka Tinkerbots), a rather lovely junkbot called HUDSON, found in the Boing Boing Flickr Pool. He's also the guy who gave us these bots and these stellar rayguns. He's got a shop, but it's presently empty (let's hope it gets some stock for Christmas!).

HUDSON