Unscii: a new unicode font set for old-school text-art

Viznut created a set of bitmapped Unicode fonts for use on your bulletin boards.

Years ago, I noticed that Unicode had a bunch of pseudographic characters that could be used to enrichen Ansi art. However, no one seemed to use them. Even MUDs that used the 256-color Xterm palette and had no issues with Unicode still preferred to stick to the blocks available in the MS-DOS codepage 437.

After looking into existing Unicode fonts, the reason became obvious: the implementation of non-CP437 graphics characters was shaky at best. Unicode Consortium doesn't even care how pseudographics are implemented. It was a kind of chicken-and-egg problem: No commonly accepted Unicode graphics font, no Unicode art scene; no art scene, no font support. The idea of an art-compatible Unicode font was born.

They're based on fonts from the Commodores 64 and Amiga, the Amstrad CPC, the IBM PC's original ROM font, and iconic Atari arcade fonts. Read the rest

Star Wars fans: You have to see this animated ASCII remake of Episode IV

It was 1997 when Simon Jansen started his remake of the first Star Wars film -- Episode IV - A New Hope -- as an ASCII animation (or "asciimation," as he coined it). Read the rest

ASCII weather page

Igor Chubin's wttr.in shows the weather in non-proportional ASCII-art form. It's beautiful, clean and completely legible, unlike almost every modern weather service on the web. On my terminal (Windows, Chrome) the rendering of Lucida Sans Typewriter seems not quite perfect: a pixel too wide here and there. I think it's because of the unicode directional arrows for the wind, perhaps in combination with me browsing on Windows. Read the rest