Using a dutch oven really improved my sourdough loaves

The biggest single improvement to my sourdough baking hobby has been using a pre-heated dutch oven. Read the rest

Baking Skullzones, skull-shaped calzones, for Halloween or any time

Awesome baking project for Halloween. Read the rest

How rainbow sprinkles are made

From Food Insider:

Rainbow cake sprinkles have been around since the late 18th century, when French candy chefs used them as decorations. Today, liquid food coloring, shortening, and sugar are mixed in hot water to form the sprinkle's colorful dough. Long strands of the dough are broken into the tiny shapes we see on cakes, doughnuts, cookies, and ice cream.

(via Laughing Squid)

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SpongeBob bread and other carb-based delights

Konel Bread specializes in bread that depicts animals, cartoon characters, and other fun stuff when it's sliced. Read the rest

These deliciously geometric pies are almost too pretty to eat

Lauren Ko of LOKOKITCHEN in Seattle bakes up pies and tarts that are so creative that fans might feel bad slicing into them. Read the rest

Little Red Velvette, a Prince-inspired book of baked goods

Inspired by the Purple One himself, this cookbook is the work of Cat Food, a "super small, super busy, super tiny bakery" in South East London. Inside its pages you'll find Prince-ly recipes for Purple Rain ombre cakes, Raspberry Beret tarts, Darling Stikki toffee puddings, Most Beautiful Swirl in the World brownies, and more.

The book is available to preorder now for £9.00 from Belly Kids. It's set to ship in March.

I have to wonder though, as cute as this is, how long it will be before the Prince estate shuts it down?

Purple Rain ombre cake

Little Red Velvette cupcakes

Previously: Prince and his purple piano inspired this new Pantone Color

(Nerdist) Read the rest

Baking fantastic bagels is supremely simple

I love bagels. I wanted to learn to make delicious ones at home. I was surprised at how simple it really is. Read the rest

Halloween Brimstone Bread

Instructables member Tye Rannosaurus has baked something special for Halloween, blood-red-on-the-inside and black-as-soot-on-the-outside Brimstone Bread:

Rumor has it, when demons in Hell make this bread, they roll the dough in the deep pits of sulfur and soul dust and cook them in the hot brimstone vents. Unfortunately, as you are mortal and have neither access to soul dust or brimstone vents, I’ve had to make a few adjustments to the recipe for you.

While these rolls aren’t actually “Hell Authentic,” they’re close enough to get the job done.

More of Tye's horrible Halloween recipes can be found at Necro Nom-nom-nomicon. Read the rest

This pan does a heck of a job making brownies!

Do you like brownies with crispy edges all around? Gooey in the middle? This is the brownie making pan for you!

My daughter continues to point out things that must be perfected with what I cook. She is, in her own words, "very particular." Brownies, she told me, would be so much better if every tasty bite was like a treat cut from the corner of the pan. So, we found a pan that is all corners!

Kinda like a cupcake pan for brownies, this one comes kid endorsed.

Chicago Metallic Professional Slice Solutions Brownie Pan, 9-Inch-by-13-Inch via Amazon Read the rest

Houston bakers trapped by floods made bread for two days straight

El Bolillo's late shift bakers found Houston's streets impassable during the hurricane, but since the power was still on, they got to work turning two tons of flour into pan dulce for the two days they were stuck inside. Read the rest

Poop emoji brownies

When life hands you shit, make poop emoji brownies. YouTuber Rosanna Pansino shows you how.

First you're going to need one (or more) of her 6-cavity poop swirl treat molds.

Then you'll need to follow the recipe, which is here:

"Ta-Doo-Doo! Poo never smelled so good!"

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New oven to bake bread in space

A German start-up has prototyped a bread oven that operated in microgravity that may someday enable astronauts to enjoy fresh-baked goods in space. Currently, astronauts eat tortillas because they aren't crumbly and have a long shelf-life. (See the below photo of a rather unappetizing tortilla cheeseburger on the International Space Station.) From Space.com:

On Earth, bread needs to be baked at a temperature of about 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Once it’s done, the bakers remove it from the heated oven. But that would not be possible in space. Processes such as thermal convection, which helps to mix up air on Earth, don't work in space. If a bubble of air that hot were to escape from the oven in orbit, it could stay floating inside the station for quite a while, posing a serious health risk to the astronauts, (Bake In Space CEO Sebastian) Marcu said.

Marcu said the team has found a way to overcome this challenge.

"We basically put the baking product, the dough, inside the cold oven and start heating it up," he said. "Once it's almost done, we start cooling it down. But at that time, any product will start to get dry, and that's why we need to design the oven so that some water is added during the baking process."

The oven also needs to be able to operate with only 270 watts of power — about one-tenth the power used by conventional ovens on Earth. Marcu said the team hopes to have a prototype ready by the end of this year.

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DIY apple rose pastries

A simple but elegant dessert inspired by the new Beauty and the Beast movie. Read the rest

How to make a giant carrot-shaped carrot cake for Easter

Yolanda Gampp of the YouTube channel How To Cake It demonstrates how to make a giant carrot-shaped carrot cake that's perfect for Easter or just for a spring party. Read the rest

Glowing, UV-reactive Tron pie

Jessica Leigh Clark-Bojin, storied nerd piemaker, created this fluorescing Tron pie, doped with tonic water for extra UV-reacting goodness. Read the rest

Adjustable thickness rolling pin for perfect crusts and pasta

I bought this adjustable thickness rolling pin for my mother last year and she told me it is excellent. I just bought one for our home, too. It's a long wooden rolling pin with removable discs of different diameters so you can make dough 1/16, 1/6, 1/4, or 3/8-inch thick. Or don't use any rings and roll bareback. It's $(removed) on Amazon.

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Nesting bowls with spill-guards and spouts obviate funnels and reduce mess

Megan McArdle's annual kitchen gift guide hipped me to these POURfect Mixing Bowls ($45/6 bowls), which have spill-guards and spouts, and of which McArdle writes, "after you’ve sifted your dry ingredients, you can pour them straight into the mixer bowl without getting a cloud of flour everywhere. Or strain your fry oil into one, then easily pour it into a container for either storage and reuse, or disposal -- I don’t even know where my funnels are, because I haven’t used one in years." Read the rest

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