Ridley Scott unpacks the original Alien chestburster scene

Ridley Scott pauses his iconic in-camera chestburster scene in several places to show the tricks he used to make it so memorable. Read the rest

Ridiculously detailed typographical analysis of Blade Runner

If you love Ridley Scott's sci-fi masterpiece, Blade Runner, the minutia of film, and nerding out over typography, prepare to have your neck bolts blown. Dave Addey runs Typeset in the Future, a website dedicated to the typographic elements found in sci-fi films. He has previously examined the titling, signage, logotypes, text messaging, and visual displays found in 2001: A Space Odyssey, Moon, and Alien. Here, he turns his typographical attentions to Ridley Scott's 1982 sci-fi classic, Blade Runner.

In 5,000 words and hundreds of screen caps, Dave goes through every scrap of textual content seen in the film. What's equally amazing to the point of the piece-- typographic analysis--is how much you learn about every other aspect of the film. This one narrow skew of the movie reveals so many other angles and tangents. Blade Runner is a film I already know too much about and I still learned so much more and had numerous "ah-ha" moments.

The first time we meet Deckard, he’s sat in the Los Angeles rain, idly reading a newspaper. The headline of this newspaper is FARMING THE OCEANS, THE MOON AND ANTARCTICA, in what looks like Futura Demi:

Here’s a close-up shot of that newspaper prop, from an on-set photo of Harrison Ford and Ridley Scott:

The subtitle reads WORLD WIDE COMPUTER LINKUP PLANNED, in what looks like Optima Bold. While the idea of a World Wide Computer Linkup might seem passé as we approach 2019, it was still very much unusual in 1982 when Blade Runner was released.

Read the rest

'Alien' piñata

Hecho en Mexico.

Prometheus trailer reveals Alien prequel

The high-definition trailer for Ridley Scott's forthcoming science fiction movie, Prometheus, is bound to impress. [iTunes] Read the rest