Fox News has filed a trademark for "OK Boomer" — and they're not the first ones to do it

Rupert Murdoch has never met an irrational fear of the Boomer set that he couldn't exploit for cash. Which is why Fox News filed a trademark for "OK Boomer" earlier this month, just weeks after the current media meme trend of the term took off.

There's nothing unique about Fox's move here. In all honesty, it's probably a rational money-making decision for a lecherous media conglomerate that feeds on the souls of Baby Boomers to make a profit. They're not the first ones to try it, either. On Halloween—twelve days before Fox filed their paperwork—Kevin Yen of Little Neck, NY filed an "OK Boomer" merchandise trademark. Rustbelt Creations joined the party on November 12, in hopes of making some stickers, decals, and temporary tattoos; this application even includes the trademark "…," which Boomers love to use in place of all other punctuation, particularly when discussing the insidious machinations of George Soros. On November 13, William Grundfest of Los Angeles filed a trademark for "OK BOOMER!" with an exclamation point, which is obviously going to be a ticketed evening of live entertainment including plays, concerts, and lectures.

There's a good chance that none of these trademarks will be approved—like Lebron James's "Taco Tuesday" trademark attempt, the office might deem the phrase to be too ubiquitous. Read the rest

Sanders campaign accused of "trademark bullying"

Daniel McCall of Liberty Maniacs, an online jokey t-shirt and mug shop, received a nastygram from the Sander's campaign. It would appear Sanders is turning to intellectual property thuggery in an attempt to silence voices it does not like, even cute pictures with Karl Marx.

McCall's lawyer has answered the Bernie 2016 folks with a letter of their own.

Via BuzzFeed:

Paul Levy, McCall’s lawyer, responded to Hawkins, accusing the Sanders campaign of “trademark bullying.”

In his letter, Levy wrote to Hawkins: “It is your contention, apparently, that an ordinary and reasonably prudent consumer would tend to be confused about whether it is the Sanders campaign that is promoting Sanders’ candidacy by associated him with the 19th Century theoreticians of the communist movement as well as with three ruthless Communist Party dictators.”

Levy called the contention “absurd,” adding that the Sanders campaign “cannot use trademark theories to silence members of the American public who disagree with your client’s views and oppose his candidacy.”

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