This is the best $2 I've spent on a cat toy

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The Cat Dancer is a 30-inch piece of wire with some little cardboard cylinders on the end. My cats go crazy for it. I stuck it on the wall with the adhesive mount, but I ended up taking it off so I could hold it and play directly with my cats. That way they won't get bored as quickly. Now they start meowing when they see me take it out of the drawer. It's $2 on Amazon. Read the rest

The raccoon learned not to dunk cotton candy in water

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A couple of days ago I posted a video of a raccoon that dipped a block of cotton candy in water and became confused when it dissolved instantly. What I didn't know is that the video was part of a longer video that shows that the raccoon learned on the third time not to dip cotton candy in water. Read the rest

Taxidermy "gooseneck" lamp

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Sculptor Sebastian ErraZuriz rescued a damaged stuffed goose from a taxidermy museum's trash and turned it into a "gooseneck" lamp.

Rescued from the trashcan of an old taxidermy museum, the taxidermy bird with a broken neck get’s given a new life as and reconstructed to become an iconic classic. The Duck Lamp by New York based artist and designer Sebastian ErraZuriz is an eerie, yet funny and beautiful object that explores the borders between sculptural and functional of both art and design.

DUCK LAMP II [Sebastian ErraZuriz]

(via Neatorama) Read the rest

Raccoon tries to wash cotton candy, but it dissolves instantly

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This raccoon found a chunk of cotton candy. When the animal dipped the cotton candy into a puddle to wet it, the chunk dissolved, and the raccoon was like, wtf?

Why do raccoons dip their food into water? It's not to clean it, and it is not to soften it. How Stuff Work says raccoons wet their food as a way to give them "a more vivid tactile experience and precise information about what they're about to eat." Read the rest

Some are upset by a photo of a dog with a slice of ham on its face

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Stephen Roseman posted this photo of his dog with a slice of ham on its face to Facebook on December 23, with the comment:

This poor dog was badly burned and disfigured trying to save his family from a house fire

One like = one prayer

One share = ten prayers

The post has gotten over 100,000 shares on Facebook. Some people apparently did not understand that Roseman was kidding, and prayed for the dog. When people learned that the dog was not injured, some thought it was funny and others became upset.

Buzzfeed attempted to contact Roseman to get his comment on the uproar, but he appears to be in Portugal on vacation. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

This poor dog was badly burned and disfigured trying to save his family from a house fireOne like = one prayerOne share = ten prayers

Posted by Stephen Roseman on Wednesday, December 23, 2015
Read the rest

What can animals read from human faces?

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A smile can speak a thousand words but those words may remain in the wilderness if the recipient doesn’t speak human. Of course animals have many ways in which to interpret our emotions and intentions. They can listen to our voices, smell our bodily chemicals, touch us with their paws, hands and claws, taste us with their overworked tongues and they can see us with observant eyes.

They can see us.

This final sense is quite curious when we are thinking about animals watching us. What is it they are actually seeing? We know they understand many forms of visible body language but what about our faces? Is there any evidence they understand anything from our facial expressions and if there is, what would they be basing their understanding on? Is there anything we could do to aid their understanding of our facial expressions? Racing ahead, what would any inter-species facial communication between humans and animals mean for possible future meetings with extra-terrestrials?

Let’s begin by looking at some of the evidence available. In 2004, the Journal of Comparative Psychology published the results of a study that showed dolphins instinctively comprehend human gazing to the extent that they understand the difference between what the study called static gazing and dynamic gazing. Static gazing being an idle stare with no action required and dynamic gazing meaning a gaze that prompted the dolphins to interact with an object. No verbal commands or prior training were needed for the dolphins to comprehend the difference. Read the rest

Parrot admires self in the mirror

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A Caique Phoenix enjoying the thrill of seeing oneself in a mirror. [via] Read the rest

Steiff Japan's centaur teddybears

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The Teddytaur is an actual, $400 product, made from alpaca-wool, sold by high-end toymaker Steiff in its Japanese store. (Thanks, Fipi Lele!) Read the rest

Exercise wheel for cats

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While looking for a new wheel for our hamster, my wife spotted this cat exercise wheel, which began life (where else) on Kickstarter and is now an object in the stream of commerce. Read the rest

Funny photos of cats that pose like pin-up models

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Here are a few samples from one of the better cats-that-look-like-pinup-model websites out there.

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An animal filled a microwave antenna with over 300 pounds of acorns

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Who stuffed this microwave antenna to the bursting point with 300 pounds (about 35-50 gallons) of acorns?

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The littlest nope ever

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[via] Read the rest

A gecko in an AT-AT costume

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The creator offers a lot of sound advice on owning and caring for geckos, too. Images and build-log [Overlordofllama] Read the rest

Kick Litter is a 9-step program for recovering litter addicts

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See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Dogs get all the credit when it comes to training. Yes, they can fetch bones, sit on command, bark for food, play ball, walk on two legs, roll over, play dead, pull sleds, and probably perform about one hundred other chores and fun tricks. But can they sit on the loo while doing their business? I think not. Cats, however, can be trained to do this in as little as two weeks, as instructed in Perre DiCarlo’s nine-step Kick Litter manual.

I first met DiCarlo two months ago at Boing Boing’s Weekend of Wonder. He gave a Powerpoint talk on how to train your cat to use the toilet. Who knew such a peculiar topic could be absolutely mesmerizing? Perre masterfully blended loads of humor with practical how-to steps that kept even cat-haters completely engaged.

He ended up sending me a signed copy of his pamphlet-sized book, and I love it on many levels. The design is wonderfully whimsical, the toilet-training steps are clear with nice illustrations, and each page is adorably funny. As an added layer to the book, we also get a short story told in the first person, er, I mean first kitty, by Di Carlo’s cats Moxie and Cooper. We get to hear a charming account of the cats' training experiences, including the time Cooper fell into the bowl, and how Moxie, the female, was able to kick her litter addiction in only two weeks, while Cooper had a harder 2-month recovery time. Read the rest

Gentleman surprised that bull doesn't enjoy being taunted

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[via] Read the rest

SCIENCE! Louder monkeys have smaller balls

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A new study in Current Biology has found an inverse correlation between the volume of howler monkeys' notoriously loud hoots and the size of their testicles. Read the rest

Look at these parachuting beavers

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The Idaho beaver population explosion of 1948 was a big problem. Sarah Palin was still just a twinkle in her father-to-be's eye, so she couldn't be hired to shoot them from a helicopter. So Idaho's Fish and Game department resorted to Plan B: catching the critters, stuffing them into boxes, flying them to remote areas, and dropping them by parachute to their new home. The plan worked!

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