Racist, sexist, gross and weird: THANKSGIVING


From the late 1800s to the early 1940s, many Americans celebrated Thanksgiving by dressing up as "ragamuffins" in masked costumes and then thronged the streets, basically trick-or-treating for money and gifts. Read the rest

Woman adds vaginal yeast to sourdough starter, Internet flips out


When Zoe Stavri woke up with a yeast infection, she had a strange and intriguing idea: what about adding some of her vaginal candida to sourdough starter? Read the rest

What's the difference between sweet potatoes and yams?


After watching this video, I realize I've never eaten a yam. According to the President of the Sweet Potato Council, yams in the United States are only found in "specialty stores." Yams have been a staple in some African countries for centuries, and when slaves were brought to the US, they referred to sweet potatoes as "yams." The name stuck. Read the rest

Watch this Indian street vendor slice vegetables like a damn boss


I could literally watch this all day.

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Green tea doesn't promote weight loss

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A meta-analysis of green tea's impact on metabolism and weight-loss, undertaken by the Cochrane trust, finds no statistically significant correlation between drinking green tea and losing weight. Read the rest

Try this addictive coconut cocoa drink


I've been trying to cut back on the amount of caffeine I drink. I stopped drinking coffee, except on weekends, and have switched to mainly to tea (herbal and black tea). I feel less jittery. Recently I started making a hot drink out of cocoa powder and coconut oil and I love it. It has a bit of caffeine in it, but much less than a cup of coffee. According to this site, a glass of chocolate milk has about as much caffeine in it as a cup of decaf coffee.

I use 1 rounded teaspoon of Now Foods Organic Cocoa powder that I buy on Amazon, and 1 rounded tablespoon of Organic Coconut Oil (unrefined, because it has that great smell and taste). I add them to about 10 ounces of hot water, and mix it with an immersion blender. The result is a creamy cup of coconut-flavored unsweetened cocoa. When I make for my daughter I use a little hot milk with the water. Read the rest

Realistic chocolate dinosaur fossil teeth: choco-megaladon/T-Rex


Sarah Hardy's megaladon (£28) and T.Rex (£28) teeth are full size, convincing, and made from gorgeous, single-origin chocolates. Read the rest

McDonald's China debuts a cement-gray bun


The barely-edible cattle-slurry battles are heating up in Asia!

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How to make "Dracula's dentures" cookie sandwiches


They've only got four ingredients and unlike many elaborate, fondant-based Hallowe'en treats, they taste good. Read the rest

RIP, Paul Prudhomme: TV chef popularized Cajun and Creole cuisine, invented turducken

Chef Paul Prudhomme. photo: shutterstock

If it weren't for Chef Paul Prudhomme, we wouldn't have turducken, and Cajun/Creole cuisine would not have become the global sensation it is today. When the charismatic television chef popularized blackened redfish, it became such an obsession the species nearly went extinct.

Chef Paul

Prudhomme died today, at 75. His restaurant, K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen, confirmed the news to CNN, and said he died after a “brief illness,” the nature of which was not further specified.

If you read only one obituary, make it his hometown paper: The New Orleans Times-Picayune. If you're not old enough to remember when he was a fixture on public television, here's a primer on why Chef Paul was so awesome.

At its peak in the 1980s, Prudhomme's profile cast a shadow even over such culinary legends as Julia Child and James Beard, and there was no restaurant-world precedent for the celebrity he enjoyed. The portly chef starred in several cooking shows and home videos, was a regular on local and national TV, appeared on magazine covers and became a best-selling cookbook author a decade before chefs such as Emeril Lagasse, his heir at Commander's Palace, ushered in the age of the celebrity chef. His first of eight books, 1984's "Chef Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen, " is still widely considered a classic.

“I think that Paul Prudhomme has had the greatest influence on American cooking, in cultivating the public interest in American food, of anybody I know,” said New York Times food critic Craig Claiborne in a 1988 interview. Read the rest

Adorable little Star Wars desserts offered at L.A. restaurant


The Star Wars merchandise machine is in full death-march, and we're already sick of the Force-sploitation. But this offbeat little gimmick has us smiling--and jonesing for some sweets.

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Howto make Zombie Mouth cupcakes


The severed, animated, flopping zombie appendage is a staple of horror films, and these zombie-mouth cupcakes look like someone has decorated an amuse-bouche with a bouche coupé. Read the rest

HOWTO make a realistic brain-cake for your zombie parties


How To Cake It's "Deep Red Velvet Brain Cake with Fondant Brain Tissue and Raspberry Jam Blood" is pretty much exactly what it sounds like, only it has to be seen to be believed. Read the rest

Eat these 5 things and live to be 110 years old, says 110 year old guy


This 110-year-old man says he managed to keep living for more than a hundred years in part by eating sensibly. Read the rest

Simple way to make popcorn on the cob

This looks fun and delicious! (I'd definitely listen to Scott Joplin while eating it too.) Read the rest

Meet the reclusive heir in charge of the In-N-Out burger dynasty


When the beloved West Coast burger chain In-N-Out opened a new store in Oregon recently, loyal fans showed up at 7 a.m. to get in line. Read the rest

Photos of sweet treats carefully arranged into pyramids and abysses


Photographer Sam Kaplan organized candy, cookies, sandwiches, and other tasty snacks into astounding architectural forms and wondrous wormholes of food. The series is titled "Pits & Pyramids." (via Laughing Squid)

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