Johnny Knoxville on every injury in his career

To promote his new film Action Point, professional jackass Johnny Knoxville made this video with Vanity Fair to share how he got every injury he's had in his career. As you can imagine, it's a painful watch.

From pepper spray and taser guns, to breaking his ankle crossing the LA river, to getting shot by a rocket over a lake and getting landed on by a motorbike, listen to Johnny break down the timeline of his injuries...

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Doctors diagnose the bad guys' injuries in 'Home Alone'

Remember how the bad guys got battered on by little Kevin's (Macaulay Culkin) booby traps in the Home Alone series?

Well, in these videos from 2015, a group of real-life doctors watched clips from both early 1990s holiday flicks and gave their professional opinion on what life-altering injuries the movie's burglars, Marv (Daniel Stern) and Harry (Joe Pesci), would have sustained. It ain't pretty.

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The products most associated with emergency room visits

Nathan Yau created an interactive visualization of Consumer Product Safety Commission data on emergency room visits spurred by product-related injuries. At the top are floor and stair injuries followed by various sports and bed injuries.

"Why People Visit the Emergency Room" (FlowingData) Read the rest

The science of faceplanting

Maggie Koerth-Baker on meme culture's most human failure--and the surprisingly awful injuries the real thing inflicts

US military continues to abuse and abandon wounded soldiers

In 2010, The New York Times uncovered systemic abuse within units meant to help wounded Army soldiers transition through months-and-years-long treatment and rehabilitation. Today, The Colorado Springs Gazette has a profile about one of the soldiers who stood up for Warrior Transition Units back then. The abuses exposed by the Times weren't fixed and Jerrald Jensen ended up becoming a victim himself. After questioning the mistreatment in the system, he was nearly given a less-than-honorable discharge, which would have cost him long-term Veteran's benefits — a pattern that the Gazette has found happening over and over among the most-vulnerable wounded Army men and women who need the most care in order to rehabilitate from their service injuries. The treatment described here is disgusting, all the more so when you compare it to Jensen's service in Iraq and Afghanistan. Exposing this kind of crap is why journalism exists. Read the rest