Learn how to wrap ten unusual shaped items

Most of us are pretty good at wrapping a cube or cuboid box, but this handy video shows how to wrap a bunch of weird shapes, including pyramids, cylinders, and those annoying cardboard-backed blister packs for things like tools and action figures.

I needed to wrap a popcorn tin the other day, and this was very handy. It looked way better than my gifts usually do! And as for opening the package itself, that's another matter.

How to Wrap 10 Challenging Shapes! (YouTube / Paper Guru) Read the rest

This artist alters books into haunting 3D sculptures

Isobelle Ouzman turns altered books she finds in SEattle dumpsters into fantastical nightscapes and placid forest scenes. Read the rest

Enjoy some of the most satisfying pop-up card designs ever

Peter Dahmen is a world-renowned pop-up book designer. In addition to books, he makes cards, sculptures and displays. Here he picked ten of his most satisfying. Read the rest

Delightful Game of Thrones papercuts

Robbin Gregorio created this papercut portrait of Olenna Tyrell, as well as many other fan favorites from Game of Thrones. Read the rest

Waiter collects 8,000 tiny artworks made from chopstick sleeves

Artist Yuki Tatsumi created Japanese Tip, an installation of the 8,000 origami "tips" left by customers at restaurants. Read the rest

Blocks of laser-perforated note-cards that reveal architectural models as leaves are torn away

Triad's Omoshiro Block ("fun block") are blocks of notecards from architectural model company Triad that have been pre-scored by a laser-cutter so that the pages separate to leave behind -- and gradually reveal -- detailed, delicate and exquisite models of Japanese architectural landmarks. Read the rest

This mini fireworks stand has real working explosives

Not sure what inspired Mav Vasquez to craft this miniature fireworks stand but I'm glad he did. He not only took the time to make each tiny papercraft firework look realistic, he also made them fully functional. Yes, each one is packed with powder and blows up!

Want to make your own? See his behind-the-scene photos over at Imgur.

Though, for $155, he'll make a replica of the stand for you (although its fireworks won't be functional). (MAKE) Read the rest

Charming papercraft reimagining of book covers

Kate Kato repurposed the popular Observer's Book series to include lovely paper sculptures of each book's subject. Above is The Observer's Book of Fungi. Read the rest

Charming interview with the creator of super-fancy paper cranes

Origamist Leyla Torres of Origami Spirit interviews paper crane enthusiast Cristian Marianciuc, and their lovely conversation covers a cool project that Marianciuc started over 1,000 days ago: creating a super-fancy paper crane each day. Read the rest

Origami keyboard

Not only is geckopfote's keyboard an amazing work of papercraft, it's one of those bizarre 40%-size ortholinear ones: "Yes, it's a fully functional Planck keyboard, from olkb. And yes, I like the feeling of paper under my fingertips." [via]

Adds geckopfote, when asked if they just covered keys in paper: "No it wasn't that easy. It was a long journey of trial and error. I wanted to make DSA style keycaps and so I did some QCad drawings where I tried to fit the right dimensions. Then, in short, print, spray, cut, fold, clue - ready!"

It being Reddit, someone was soon along to inform the creator that his work was kirigami, not origami. Read the rest

Papercraft haunted dollhouse furniture, housewares and decor

Spanish Etsy seller EasyPrintAndCut makes tiny, printable papercraft furniture, housewares and decor for haunted dollhouses: grimoires, vampire hunting kits, spooky wallpaper and wainscotting, tiny taxidermy, adorably tiny engravings from tiny gothic antique books and much more -- all for instant delivery. Read the rest

How to make an origami umbrella that opens and closes

"This rainy season not only play with paper boat but also a paper umbrella. How to fold an origami umbrella."

Here's Priti Sharma using scissors, which technically makes it not origami, I believe.

Origami Umbrella : That Open and Closes (new) (YouTube / Surprise Toys) Read the rest

Haruki Nakamura's kinetic paper toys

Kelly Richman-Abdou reports on the fabulous animal puppets made by Haruki Nakamura. Beautifully-animated cartoon surprises—but made of paper!

Crafted from paper and cleverly constructed, each whimsical creature puts a paper twist on karakuri, or mechanized puppets. Like traditional karakuri, each figure's movements are prompted by human touch. This means that when pressed, poked, or prodded in certain places, the puppets come alive. Whether they're shedding surprising disguises, showcasing amazing acrobatics, or coming out of their shells (literally), the animals exhibit both the capabilities of the kirigami craft and Nakamura's creative approach to paper dolls.

While Nakamura sells his delightful dolls in his online shop, they only ship within Japan. However, if you're overseas and would like to get your paws on your own paper puppets, you can learn how to create your own with Karakuri: How to Make Mechanical Paper Models That Move. Or, if it's kirigami that has piqued your paper interest, check out Kirigami: The Art Of Folding & Cutting Paper.

Read the rest of Kelly's article for many more GIFs like the one here. Read the rest

Fabulous papercraft models of antique cameras

Korean artist Ji-Hee Lee makes all sorts of classic cameras as paper models, like this 1989 Rolleiflex. Here's a photo of the actual camera: Read the rest

Watch: a gifted and personable napkin folder who makes "botanically correct flowers"

Arnold Drake World is a talented paper artist who sits at a communal table at the cafe in Portland's legendary Powell's City of Books and turns paper napkins and towels into "botanically correct flowers" with many flourishes and grace-notes. Read the rest

Intricate paper cutouts of animals, colored by nature

Faye Halliday recently started making variants of her intricate animal drawings with cut-out sections. She then held them up in beautiful locales to create a delightful effect. Read the rest

Watch this timelapse of creating incredibly tiny origami cranes

YouTuber David Kawai makes impossibly small origami cranes. After watching this timelapse, check out his Instagram:

I start with a square approximately 5 by 5 mm. Each crane takes about 45 minutes to fold if I’m very focused and accurate, but I still occasionally fail and need to start over from the beginning, which can be frustrating. For the most part, I use my fingertips to roll and press the paper into position, which requires sight and touch sensitivity in combination. Then, to make the folds sharper, I use a surface like a table and my fingernails. When folding, at times, I’m holding the paper with just my fingernails. The most important thing is to be very precise when laying the initial folds. Even half a millimetre of inaccuracy can affect the end result dramatically. Also, don’t handle the paper too much, especially with moist or sweaty hands, or the paper will get mushy and the folds won’t react properly. I often let the paper rest and dry for 30 minutes after making the first 16 folds. Though it can be exhausting and time-consuming, I find the process meditative, challenging and super satisfying.

Tiny Origami Crane Folding Timelapse (YouTube / dkktube via Instagram) Read the rest

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