Homebrew Cadillac limo/snowcat for sale

Robert Falck from Vancouver built a 1989 Cadillac Brougham limousine onto a Bombardier Skidozer snowcat. You can own this fine vehicle for $6,000. According to the Craigslist ad, it was "last used 2 years ago." From Jalopnik:

Falck said he built this contraption for a movie, which featured a rich guy who owned a ski resort. When filming was done, the Vancouverite decided to buy the Caddy back. Now it’s up for sale on Craigslist for a price that, he says, doesn’t reflect what he’s put into the vehicle.

Falck says the thing will move, but it’s not likely to climb a mountain or blaze its own trail; the vehicle is best left on groomed trails, and it’s not likely to exceed 15 mph.

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Magic cocaine rides the wind into Florida woman's purse

As Rick James would be the first to tell you if he weren't dead, cocaine's a helluva drug. Aside from providing an intense high that can be followed by an even more intense bout of depression, tons of fun paranoia, anger, breathing issues and maybe if you're really into the stuff, death. Until today, I have to admit that I was unaware that it also has the power of flight.

According to the New York Times, Floridian (of course she's from Florida) Kennecia Posey was found by officers from the Fort Pierce Police Department to have a goodly amount of marching powder in her purse. The pouch of nose candy was discovered during a traffic stop after seeing the car that Posey was a passenger in was swerving all over the road. The cops decided to search Posey's purse after smelling marijuana in the car. I can't tell you what Posey had to say about her left-handed cigarettes, but her theory on how the bag of rail ended up in there is amazing: she claimed that with it being a windy day, the stuff must have blown in there.

I guess it goes without saying that Posey is getting dinged up on charges of cocaine possession and a misdemeanor count of marijuana possession. I really hope that she fights the charges in court – hard. I want expert witnesses called in to able to talk about the flight qualities of a bag of blow. I demand to hear the arguments over the aerodynamics of an ounce of Yeyo. Read the rest

Freaky orange snow falls on parts of Eastern Europe

Pats of Russia, Bulgaria, Ukraine, Romania, and Moldova was covered with orange snow this weekend. The odd hue was caused by sand blown into the atmosphere from the Sahara Desert that mixed with snow and rain. The same Saharan dust also resulted in a very orange tint to the Greek island of Crete, seen below.

"African Dust Turns Snow Orange in Eastern Europe" (Weather.com)

Второй день после выпадения загадочных осадков. Самочувствие хорошее, аномалий не обнаружено, третья рука не выросла. Полагаю версии о токсичных отходах/цементе/или чего-то там ещё, о чем холят слухи в интернетах, можно отсечь. Самый что ни на есть настоящий песок⛰ #sandboarding #nofilter #moodygrams #justgoshoot #aov #artofvisual #artofvisuals #heatercentral #agameoftones #fatalframes #hypebeast #pic #citysquad #gameoftones #createexplore #all_shoots #madrussians #rosakhutor #gorkygorod #krasnayapolyana #горкигород #розахутор #вотэтода #snow #mothernature #naturelover #goodvibes. #инструкторкраснаяполяна #инструкторсноуборд #инструкторпосноуборду

A post shared by Алексей Козин (@slivi4) on Mar 24, 2018 at 4:23am PDT

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Watch this scientist make identical snowflakes

Southern California might seem like a strange place to study snowflakes, but that's where Ken Libbrecht perfected his technique for making identical snowflakes. Read the rest

Watch this very good boy fearlessly escape a pack of wolves

While bopping around Italy's Abruzzo National Park, zoologist Paolo Forconi witnessed a pack of three young wolves assaulting a garden variety house pooch. While it takes a few nips from the wolves, their young jaws, according to Forconi, weren't able to do much damage. Tthe dog was able to make its escape through a small hole in a fence. Read the rest

See the marvelous colors "inside" snowflakes

Don Komarechka captures astonishing photographs of snowflakes. His book Sky Crystals is a survey of snowflake science, a monograph of his macrophotography masterpieces, and a tutorial on the techniques. At Petapixel, Komarechka explains the surprising pop of color sometimes seen through the lens when he's shooting a snowflake:

As a snowflake grows it often creates a cavity or bubble inside of it where the inner side of the crystal grows slower than the top and bottom edge. This forces the layers of ice on either side of the bubble to be incredibly thin, so much so that light will interfere with itself.

Some light will reflect off the surface of the snowflake, but some will also enter the ice (slowing down due to the density of ice compared to air) and reflect off the inner ice/air boundary back towards the camera. If the ice is thin enough, the distance between the two rays of light is close enough to force them to interfere with each-other now that they are out of sync. Some wavelengths get amplified and others get reduced, resulting in a distinctive color emerging based on the thickness of the ice.

"How I Capture Vibrant Colors Inside Snowflakes" (PetaPixel)

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This 101-year old woman is having a good time making snowballs

This 101-year-old knows how to have fun. She also throws a lot better than I do.

This man caught his 101-year-old mother playing in the snow and making a snowball on camera and it is the sweetest reminder that it is the simple pleasures in life that make us happy.

Armand Foisy from Lillooet lives with his wife and his old mom Albina. Armand says that it is amazing how Albina’s strength and joy of living is contagious. She laughs at everything and is so giving. Way to live your life, sweet lady!

It is good that Armand keeps his camera around in order to capture the special moments like this. It was snowing outside so Armand decided to take his elderly mother for a ride and give her the joy of a lifetime. Fortunately, the snow level was really low so they managed to pull over and stop the car in order to enjoy the snow.

Watch Albina’s face expression when she is out in the snow. She is overjoyed with excitement and her story can serve as a reminded that it is the simple pleasures in life that give a special meaning to it.

!function(){function t(){for(h=[],n=document.getElementsByTagName("iframe"),i=0;in?360:n)+"px")}var n,i,o,a,h=[],c="";(a=window.addEventListener)||(a=window.attachEvent)&&(c="on"),a(c+"load",t),a(c+"resize",e),t()}(); Read the rest

Exhilarating highlights from a year of pro snowboarding

Heart-pounding snowboard footage set to the original version of "Major Tom"? Yes please! Read the rest

Watch these two guys in Japan remove a great deal of snow from a roof

The Japanese word for snow is 雪 (yuki). I'm teaching myself kanji through a program called wanikani (just made it to level 10), and I memorized the word by associating snow with "yucky." This video strengthens my association with the word. Read the rest

Video of man falling over for 9 seconds has surprise ending

I shalln't spoil it for you. [via] Read the rest

Amtrak vs snow, in slow-mo

An Amtrak train pulls into a station somewhere up east. The only problem? The tracks are already occupied by snow, piled a good six inches higher than the platform itself. Commuter Nick Colvin knows what's about to happen and has his iPhone set to record slow-mo footage, but as he writes, there was "a more spectacular arrival than expected." Read the rest

Hand stuck to freezing metal? Urinate on it.

The US Navy's Polar Manual from 1965 may come in handy during this week's blizzards. From the list of "Polar Do's And Don't's":

1. Dares are neither offered nor taken. Necessary risks are bad enough.

25. Heavy and bulky polar clothing makes you clumsy and prone to accidents from lack of normal agility. Plan NOT to have an accident.

26. Do not touch cold metal with moist, bare hands. If you should inadvertently stick a hand to cold metal, urinate on the metal to warm it and save some inches of skin. If you stick both hands, you'd better have a friend along.

PDF: Polar Manual, Fourth Edition, 1965 (via Weird Universe)

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How to clear a road buried 60 feet in snow

Japan's Mt. Tateyama in the Hida Mountains is considered one of the snowiest spots on the planet. More than 125 feet of snow can fall on the region in a single year. Route 6 runs right through the Mt. Tateyama but just before you enter the tunnel, there's a 1/4 mile piece of highway called yuki-no-otani, or in English, Snow Canyon. The Toyama Prefectural Road Public Corporation is responsible for plowing the road after winter. It takes about a month. From Atlas Obscura:

At the Snow Canyon, the non-human star of the show is the HTR608, a rotary snow blower made by the Nichijo company—the 608 refers to the 608-horsepower engine. The HTR608 can plow through snow up to six feet high. The rotating bar helps pull snow into the machine, and a powerful propeller ejects it out of an aerodynamic pipe that can spray the snow nearly 50 feet high and half a football field to the side. But before this monster can even begin its job on the Snow Canyon, a series of prior snow-clearing events must take place.

Mt. Tateyama receives too much snow and is too remote to receive continual snow plow treatment, thus for much of the winter snow is allowed to bury the pass. Sometime in early March, a bulldozer specially equipped with both a GPS and a mobile satellite phone is sent up the mountain and over the Snow Canyon. The GPS and sat phone work in tandem to provide the driver a detailed video screen image of the dozer’s location in relation to the center of the snow-buried highway.

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‘Tis the season for 'Chicago dibs' on snow-shoveled parking spaces

With winter officially here, it’s time to revisit the unique practice that is “Chicago dibs.” Read the rest

Mysterious snowballs appear on Siberian beach

The Gulf of Ob is a remote Siberian reach of the Russian empire, and its beaches are covered in gigantic snowballs up to a meter across. The BBC reports that they're the result of a "rare environmental process where small pieces of ice form, are rolled by wind and water, and end up as giant snowballs." (Photo: SERGEI BYCHENKOV) Read the rest

Mount Washington Observatory shares video of man being blown away by 109-mph winds

The Mount Washington Observatory published this insane video from weather observers Mike Dorfman and Tom Padham demonstrating the effects of strong winds on top of a New Hampshire mountain. Read the rest

Backyard transformed into snow maze for dogs

Reddit user anneewannee shoveled a backyard snow labyrinth for dogs to play in! I hope they don't run into Jack Torrance.

(r/pics)

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