A gritty Netflix-style documentary on the Tide Pods epidemic

The folks at Reality Check Documentaries took the trailer for Netflix's gritty drug-crime docuseries DOPE and made it into a clever parody for the "Tide Pods epidemic." It works a little too well, imo.
The official trailer for #TideDoc a documentary exploring the struggles and lives of pushers and the police in their never ending cat and mouse game.

Previously: Now there's Tide Pods sushi and, yes, it's edible Read the rest

Review: Bright (2017)

The introductory sequence of Bright is enchanting: signs and street art in Los Angeles that describe a world where the races of historical high fantasy stuck around into the present day to become the mocked or honored subjects of political graffiti.

But once characters start talking, this geeky cool evaporates into a mediocre buddy-cop movie. The swirling fantasy tropes are a trash gyre on the seas of racial allegory.

Bright's contemporary LA is also anchored in the past, all sterotypical gang violence, decrepit public services and despotic crime lords. At the top of society are elves, whose fortified enclaves echo South African apartheid more than Jim Crow. At the bottom are orcs, an underclass repressed due to their former allegiance to a long-defeated Dark Lord.

In the middle is humankind, whose own internal racial consciousness and strata are supposedly absent or muted in the world of Bright—but whose humans constantly exhibit our world's racial conscioussness and strata.

When star Will Smith's character kills a verminous bat-like fairy, for example, he declares that "Fairy lives don't matter today." The "today" warps a quip into darker territory: it suggests that fairies are sentient enough for there to be a slogan opposing the moral insignificance of their lives and that he is sick of hearing about it. Smith apparently ad-libbed the line, and offers a similar one later, telling an Orc to get his "Shrek ass" out of the way.

Imagine the cultural signifiance of Shrek in the world of Bright! Read the rest

If Santa had a raunchy Netflix comedy special

Hey Santa, 1983 called. Eddie Murphy wants his tight red leather suit back.

This Team Coco bit imagines Santa Claus telling off-color jokes for a stand-up comedy special on Netflix called, "Sack Up! Santa Live!" It's so wrong. Read the rest

Kevin Spacey made 'House of Cards' set 'toxic' with sexually 'predatory' behavior, sources say

Eight current or former "House of Cards" employees claim they were sexually harassed and/or physically sexually assaulted by Kevin Spacey.

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Review: Voltron, Legendary Defender

My people raised me on the greatness of Voltron Lion Force. So when I discovered there was a remake on Netflix, I was excited. Scared. The bland unpleasantness of the Thundercats reboot lingers still with me. Last night I caught the first episodes, and I have to say I 👏 was 👏 pleasantly 👏 surprised. Read the rest

Go watch Netflix' 'American Vandal'

Rarely do I enjoy new television. American Vandal is absolutely wonderful.

I listened to about 10 minutes of Serial and shut it off. I've always preferred to see the irony in life, rather than be reminded how terrible everything is. American Vandal is what Serial and all true crime docudrama horeshittery should be! MUNDANE, silly, outrageous, and mildly offensive! This is some of the best new comedy I've seen in ages.

It is all about the dicks.

Ganj #1 Read the rest

Raising Dion, sci-fi comic about child with superpowers, greenlit as Netflix series

Raising Dion released a trailer and comic in 2015 (previously). Now Netflix has ordered 10 episodes about raising a 7-year-old son with superpowers. Read the rest

How big is the market for DRM-Free?

It's the Day Against DRM, and EFF is celebrating by publishing the first public look at How Much Do Consumers Value Interoperability? Evidence from the Price of DVD Players, a scholarly economics paper that uses clever techniques to reveal some eye-popping number on the strangled market for DRM-free gadgets. Read the rest

I can not wait for 'Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance'

Netflix brings us a prequel series to the Jim Henson Company's epic The Dark Crystal.

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How Netflix is driving permanent, terrible, standards-defined insecurity for billions of browser users

The New Scientist has published a good piece on Encrypted Media Extensions (previously), the World Wide Web Consortium's proposed standard for adding DRM to video streams; they're creating their first-ever standard that is encompassed by laws protecting DRM (such as the DMCA), and in so doing, they're creating new liability for security researchers, who'll face unprecedented criminal and civil liability just for reporting defects in browsers. Read the rest

The Netflix library has half the titles it did four years ago

Consumer site Extreamist confirms what many suspected: Netflix has sharply reduced its streaming library titles by over 50% from an estimated 11,000 in 2012 to about 5,300 today. Read the rest

Check out the meta first trailer for Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events

The first teaser trailer for Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events features Patrick Warburton as Lemony Snicket himself. All eight episodes of the highly anticipated upcoming series drop on Netflix on January 13. Enjoy the cruel whimsy and whimsical cruelty of what’s to come. Read the rest

HTML standardization group calls on W3C to protect security researchers from DRM

The World Wide Web Consortium has embarked upon an ill-advised project to standardize Digital Rights Management (DRM) for video at the behest of companies like Netflix; in so doing, they are, for the first time, making a standard whose implementations will be covered under anti-circumvention laws like Section 1201 of the DMCA, which makes it a potential felony to reveal defects in products without the manufacturer's permission. Read the rest

Mascots, a new mockumentary from Christopher "Best in Show" Guest

After the astounding success of Spinal Tap, Christopher Guest directed a string of brilliant mockumentaries in the same style, like "Best in Show" and "Waiting for Guffman"; now he's created "Mascots" for Netflix, about "the ultra-competitive world of sports mascots." Read the rest

Boars, Gore, and Swords podcast talks Netflix's Stranger Things

Netflix's Stranger Things

This week on the podcast, Boars, Gore, and Swords takes a break from the A Song of Ice and Fire book club to watch the first episode of Netflix's Spielbergian horror sci-fi series Stranger Things. In this installment of What You Should Be WatchingIvan and Red discuss the shows's many references, what constitutes a solid creeping monster jump scare, and ill-fated emotional attachments to burly diner cooks.

To catch up on previous television seasons, the A Song of Ice And Fire books, and other TV and movies, check out the BGaS archive. You can find them on Twitter @boarsgoreswords, like their Facebook fanpage, and email them. If you want access to extra episodes and content, you can donate to the Patreon. Read the rest

Mur Lafferty's "Shambling Guide to NYC" is coming to Netflix!

Mur Lafferty, an amazing author and podcaster, had her mainstream publishing debt in 2013 with the wonderful Shambling Guide to New York City, about a travel writer who gets tapped to write a guidebook for spooks, haints, vampires and werewolves. Read the rest

Cinesift is a handy way to find great movies by platform

Whenever I think I've exhausted the possibilities of Netflix or Amazon Prime, I jump on Cinesift and use their handy filters for a deep dive into the vaults.

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