Emotional labor watch: "Closers" flirt on behalf of men who use Tinder

Closers are paid $1.45/session to log into (usually) men's dating-app accounts and flirt with the women in their queue for 10 minute stretches, as part of a gig-economy company called Vida (Virtual Dating Assistants). Read the rest

"Pickup artist" douche uses copyright to sue Youtube critics, fans raise $100K defense fund

Ewan McGee writes, "Creators of the YouTube channel H3H3 productions are being sued by the creator of the YouTube channel MattHossZone for showing/talking about one of his 'pick up' videos. YouTuber Philip DeFranco talks about the story in his YouTube show, sets up a GoFundMe page for the creators of H3H3 to help them with their legal fees, and donations come pouring in, including support from well-known names like Mark "Markiplier" Fischbach, Markus "Notch" Persson and others. In just 12 hours over 3,000 people have already donated more than $95,000 in total." Read the rest

Red Pill, Blue Pill: if Dr Seuss wrote about Men's Rights Advocates

Jaya Saxena and Matt Lubchansky roast the Red Pill men's rights movement in a scathing, scintillating, rhyming Dr Seuss parody that features such gems as: "They’re in the friendzone!/What a pity/Stuck in the orbit/Of a girl that’s pretty." Read the rest

WATCH: Fat Albert learns about consent

In a very special episode, Rudy teaches Fat Albert that getting friendzoned doesn't mean no, thanks to "Rudy's Little Helper." Hope this doesn't trigger the Cos! Read the rest

A beginner's guide to the Redpill Right

The gnostic paradox of young, tech-savvy traditionalists, who see through everything except their own conspiracy theories

Kickstop: how a sleazebag slipped through Kickstarter's cracks

Pick-up artists are, sadly, a community. It even has a handy three-letter abbreviation: PUA. It dates back to the 1970s and has been enabled and expanded, like all affinity groups, by the Internet's network effect. In the last week, I suspect that tens of millions of people, if not more, have become aware of the extent of the subculture due to a Kickstarter campaign for a book about applying PUA stratagems.

A guy not involved in that community spotted the project and raised an objection in a blog post in its closing hours due to what he said was material intended for the book but not posted on Kickstarter that advised forms of sexual assault. Kickstarter declined to halt the campaign; it funded; Kickstarter then apologized and made changes. Was the writer correct about sexual assault? Are PUAs misunderstood? Did Kickstarter under-, then overreact? Read the rest