HOWTO make incredibly resilient DIY liquid glass putty

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If you enjoyed our previous post on Liquid Glass Putty, a fun and amazing material with all kinds of interesting uses, you'll love this update.

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Make your own Secret Wood Rings with these DIY tips

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Secret Wood Rings are pretty cool-looking, so Peter Brown decided to experiment with making his own using some resin and hand-splintered wood. Not bad for the first try! Read the rest

HOWTO wrap cables like a pro: Roadie Wrap

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Todd Hobin demonstrates the technique every roadie, gaffer, and electrician will teach you the first day of the job: how to wrap cables. If you deal with long cords, ropes, or cables, this will change your life! Read the rest

This insane DIY fan-made Daft Punk helmet even comes with WIFI

1 - First GM01 Unit My hand-made robotic Daft Punk helmet

LoveProps has indeed crafted a “Perfect Daft Punk Helmet,” and I dare say it's better than the original worn by the band.

“The designing, building and programming of the GM01 unit took more than one year of daily work,” says the maker, who is a fan. “Finishing it with the desired quality was a huge odyssey.”

Damn. This thing is no joke. Read the rest

Jailed driver used frying pan as replacement steering wheel

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A fellow in Adelaide, Australia was arrested for several traffic offenses including using a modified (and magic-markered) frying pan as a steering wheel. From the South Australia Police:

Further checks revealed the car was unregistered and uninsured and had recently been defected and the defect label had been removed.

The 32-year-old from Adelaide was charged with driving unregistered, uninsured, drive contrary to defect, remove defect label, alter number plate and breach of bail. He has been bailed to appear in the Adelaide Magistrates Court on 11 October.

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Makeshift candles from household items

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If the power goes out, Willow Haven Outdoor reminds us you might have some household items that would make a good candle. Read the rest

Meet the Megaprocessor: a 16-bit CPU the size of a room

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Chipmaking is a relentless competition to make transistors smaller and smaller. Such refined technology is as inscrutable to users as angels dancing on the head of a few hundred copper pins, so James Newman set out to make a working CPU whose every connection can be explored and understood by students.

"Like all modern processors the Megaprocessor is built from transistors," he writes. "It's just that instead of using teeny-weeny ones integrated on a silicon chip it uses discrete individual ones... Thousands of them. And loads of LEDs."

The resulting machine took two years to construct and recalls the earliest room-filling electronic computers, with banks of blinking lights and ropes of cable linking each refridgerator-sized peripheral. But this time, it's by choice rather than limitation: with a light on every connection, you can see the logic and movement of data through the chip in person.

Ten meters wide and 2 meters tall, the 16-bit Megaprocessor is deliberately simple and slow. Clocked at 20kHz, it could feel at home in an airport-sized Commodore Amiga or classic Mac, though it's not quite as complicated as the Motorola 68000 that inspired it.

There's already software to play with, though, including a rough implementation of Tetris. You can download an emulator to get started on making your own.

"I didn't plan on ending up here. I started by wanting to learn about transistors," Newman writes. "Things got out of hand. Read the rest

Junkyard flintnapping: arrowheads made from old glass and porcelain

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On Historic Hunter, Shawn Woods repurposes materials he finds in a local dump into arrowheads using antlers and simple metal objects. The ancient technique, called flintknapping, will be handy to know after the zombie apocalypse. Read the rest

See a coffee maker rebuilt into a "bionic" hand

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Maker Evan Booth transformed a Keurig K350 coffeemaker into a "bionic" hand. As William Gibson once wrote, "the street finds its own uses for things."

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Fantastic DIY miniature Nintendo Entertainment System

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Daftmike made a fantastic miniature Nintendo Entertainment System that's 40% the size of the original. It consists of a Raspberry Pi inside a 3D-printed case that he designed and a selection of mini-cartridges containing NFC tags that are read by the Raspberry Pi. Beautiful work!

NESPI (daftmike)

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See this inventor's odd bicycles from the 1930s

This engineer, active in Kidderminster, England in the 1930s, appears to be the artistic ancestor of San Francisco's Cyclecide bike rodeo. (British Pathé via Weird Universe)

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This 90-year-old man is building a cathedral by himself, by hand

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For more than 50 years, Justo Gallego has spent his days building his own beautiful cathedral outside of Madrid, all by himself.

"When I started to build this cathedral, the word on the street was that I was crazy," Gallego says.

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Pallet skating on a city's trolley tracks

And they said the Segway would change the way we moved through cities! Video of pallet skating in Bratislava, Slovakia by Tomáš Moravec.

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This man is building the business of DIY assault rifles

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Remember Cody Wilson, the founder of Defense Distributed who caused chaos last year with his design for a 3D printed gun, The Liberator? Now, Wilson and engineer John Sullivan have developed a $1500 desktop CNC mill, called the Ghost Gunner, that cranks out the key component in assault rifles. Now you can make your own AR-15! There's a waiting list to buy one and the money is going to Wilson's lawsuit against the State Department. From Rob Walker's excellent feature in Bloomberg Businessweek:

Most people can purchase a pretty good factory-built gun for $1,000. Even so, Wilson got 10 orders on Day One and started raising the price, soon cutting off pre-orders at 500. Sullivan submitted redesigned specs to suppliers by mid-December, with Wilson, Sullivan, and Denio building the earliest units themselves. They started shipping in April 2015.

Gradually, Wilson put together an assembly team—contacts from his network, random supporters who reached out via Twitter, and so on. “It’s torture man, getting going,” he says. “But here we are. It’s been a full year of Ghost Gunner shipping.” The enterprise just surpassed 2,000 units shipped. (An upgraded Ghost Gunner 2 debuted on June 21 at $1,500; you can get on a waiting list for $250.)

Sullivan has since transitioned to a “consulting role.” He spoke to me, somewhere en route to Oklahoma City, from his van, which is where he and his fiancée essentially live, having sold most of their possessions. He’s opted for a low-expense, permanent-vacation lifestyle, he says, and can now pick and choose the projects that interest him.

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How to make a spare padlock key at home

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This guy used sticky tape, a candle, a tin can lid, and scissors to make a spare key. He skipped the part where he cut the business part of the key, though. Read the rest

Ingenious idea for a Thor toolbox

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If you were a Norse god/superhero who moonlighted as a carpenter, this Thor Hammer Tool Kit would hit the nail on the head. Unfortunately right now it's just a concept design from Dave's Geeky Ideas!

When not being carried around for Asgardian cosplay, this hammer opens up to reveal all the tools stored inside. The handle is shared with an actual hammer, which is fastened into a removable tray. Beneath the tray is a reservoir for loose tools and nuts/bolts.

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Living room "wallpapered" top to bottom in books

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Deece27 bought 4,000 random books from Books by The Foot and fastened them to the wall by nailing each one to the book underneath followed by two nails angled into the wall. Check out more images of the project here. (via r/DIY)

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