Cease and Desist enamel pin

The Cease and Desist enamel pin—a hauntingly familiar soup can mounted on hauntingly familiar robot legs—is $7 on Kickstarter.

CEASE and DESIST will be Packaged Action Figure Style. With very thick Archivist Backing Cards and Custom Sized Miniature Blisters holding the pin in place.

The Enamel Pins themselves will shiny Chrome Metal finish where all the Grey areas Fall. With Black, and White Enamel Fills and one of 4 Different Standard Color Fills, Seen Below, for that extra layer of Tribute, or Infringement, depending on your point of view. PIN SIZE: 1.64 inches tall X 1.125 inches wide

I've been making making excited beeping sounds and rocking laterally since I saw it.

Diver attempting to swim in ash-covered lake

It's like something from an expedition to an alien world: "scuba diver attempts to swim in Argentina's Nahuel Huapi Lake, which has been recently covered in ash after the eruption of the Puyehue Volcano in nearby Chile."

The eruption was in 2011. Here's higher-quality video (with loudly clipping wind noise) of the undulating blanket of ash atop the waves: Orilla del lago Nahuel Huapi, Bariloche, ceniza volcán Puyehue

Here's a clip of ash and pumice washing ashore:

Here's what Nahuel Huapi normally looks like:

Here's a lake covered in dogs:

Horse not alarmed by wolves

In this footage, a wild horse is apparently unbothered by the presence of several wolves, and perhaps even quite friendly with them. Perhaps it has already sufffered a crippling injury and is going mad as the predators continuously stalk and harass it into fatigue and despair, after having already suffered brain parasites or some other tragic malady of horses. Or maybe it just doesn't give a shit.

In search of an awesome general interest gaming magazine

Last year, I went on a bit of a quest. For years, as a tabletop gamer who played Warhammer 40K almost exclusively, I subscribed to White Dwarf (or "White Dork" as my late wife used to call it). This is the slick and expensive Games Workshop publication that exclusively covers WH40K and other GW games. But as my ravenous game appetite expanded to wanting to pig out on all manner of miniature, board, RPG, and card games, I began to look for magazines that covered all of these. To my surprise, I discovered that there weren't any. Or, at least, I couldn't find one.

There are a number of excellent and beautifully-produced tabletop wargame magazines, such as Wargames Illustrated and Wargames, Soldiers, and Strategy. And there are mags that cover board and family games, such as Casual Game Insider. And then there is GTM, Game Trade Magazine, a magazine targeted at your FLGS ("friendly local game store). But where was the magazine that covers all forms of analog gaming? There's a tabletop gaming revolution going on. So where is the house organ?

Here it is. Tabletop Gaming magazine. This very handsome UK-based monthly covers all manner of board games, RPGs, card games, historical wargames, miniature games, dice games, party games, you name it. I didn't even have high expectations for the contents of such a magazine, but Tabletop Gaming delivers a very well-designed and well-written publication that examines every aspect of the gaming hobby. Feature articles cover new games being developed, aspects of game history, culture, art, design, the gaming industry, even the psychology and science of gaming. There are interviews with game designers, peeks at historical games of yore, instructional articles for game design wannabes, even hobby articles on painting miniatures, building terrain, and the like. And, as you would expect from a gaming magazine, there are loads of thoughtful reviews of the latest and greatest games in each issue.

I have read the last two issues nearly cover-to-cover. Here is some of what was inside: (January, 2018) A deep dive into the forthcoming Fallout miniatures game, 10 RPGs to play in 2018, the making of Dominion, a look at Stuffed Fables, a new storybook game from Jerry Hawthorne, designer of Mice & Mystics, a look inside the counterfeit game market, and an article on Hnefatafl ("neffa-taffle") an ancient Viking board game. (February, 2018) A detailed look at Batman: Gotham City Chronicles, the hotly anticipated miniatures board game by the creators of the Conan tabletop game, a piece on how gaming miniatures are made, what is in store for the return of Masks of Nyarlathotep, arguably one of the greatest RPG adventures ever written, and finally, a guide to painting up the miniatures for the Star Trek Adventures RPG.

Every issue also comes with a free promo card for a popular new game. You can sometimes sell these on eBay to help defray the cost of your subscription. That subscription doesn't come cheap, by the way. A 12-issue print sub, sent to the US, is £120. An annual digital sub is half that. But you can also likely pick up a copy at your FLGS. If they don't carry it, encourage them to do so. I personally am happy to pay such a price for a magazine this good that covers all of the gaming itches that I want to scratch.

South African audience celebrates 'Black Panther'

After a Friday night screening of Black Panther, Marvel's new film that celebrates African culture and pride, a group of South African moviegoers ecstatically danced outside of the theater.

That celebratory vibe was felt here in California too.

My daughter and I saw the movie in Alameda at its first showing Thursday evening and the energy in the room was wild! The theater was packed and there was lots of cheering and clapping all throughout the film.

Also here in the Bay Area, the film's director and co-writer Ryan Coogler surprised the audience before Friday night's show at Oakland's Grand Lake Theater (where lines wrapped around the block):

Born and raised in Oakland, Coogler delighted more local fans by making surprise appearances at select movie premieres in San Francisco and Emeryville.

(reddit)

Here’s what it’s like to live in an eco-friendly “Earthship”

As part of their ongoing YouTube series Homebuddies, in which they try out different forms of living (and attempt to become better friends in the process), Buzzfeed’s Niki Ang and Garrett Werner spent a few days in an “Earthship” in Taos, New Mexico. Pioneered by architect Michael Reynolds, Earthships are “sustainable, off-grid, independent, autonomous buildings” made from upcycled materials. Though Niki and Garrett go in expecting something a bit kooky and rustic, they discover that in addition to be sustainable, Earthships are also unexpectedly comfortable too.

You can learn more about Michael Reynolds’ work on the Earthship Global website or read more about Earthships on Wikipedia.

An archive of every LGBTQ character in 20th century American TV History

On his website Boy Culture, writer Matthew Rettenmund has put together an exhaustive list of LGBTQ characters, people, mentions, and moments on American primetime TV from the 1950s to 2000. Writing for The Advocate about the months-long project, Rettenmund explained:

I’d come up with the idea after stumbling upon a Wikipedia list that suggested the first gay reference of any kind of TV was a gay-panic joke on I Love Lucy in 1951. Earlier gags (if they existed at all, they were likely gags, not news breaks) may be unknowable since so much of early TV no longer exists, but thought a list similar to Wikipedia’s—with many more entries, organized strictly chronologically in order to tell a story—would engender clicks in a more fulfilling way than pictures of guys in underwear would. It felt like a way to document what was a decades-long process of slowly introducing the American public to LGBTQ topics and people in such a way as to engender “clicks” (of the channel) for TV stations while keeping tune-outs to a bare minimum.

Also, current social justice movements have presented us with the strange new pasttime of looking at recent history and judging how the people who came before handled complicated issues like race, sexual assault, and, yes, queerness. I felt a list that embraced LGBTQ representation in all its forms (the good, the bad, the you-sure-is-ugly) would perhaps provide a permanent, living record of the awkward queer-visibility movement on TV over time, allowing us to recall that some shows that were approaching the topic offensively may not have been doing so maliciously.

You can find the full list on Boy Culture.

[Photo: Will & Grace, NBCUniversal]

News of the Times Flashback: Pearl Harbor Attacked; FDR Doesn't Know Who Did It

FOLLOW @RubenBolling on the Twitters and a Face Book.

JOIN Tom the Dancing Bug's subscription club, the Proud & Mighty INNER HIVE, for exclusive early access to comics, extra comics, and much more.

GET Ruben Bolling’s new hit book series for kids, The EMU Club Adventures. ("Filled with wild twists and funny dialogue" -Publishers Weekly) Book One here. Book Two here.

More Tom the Dancing Bug comics on Boing Boing! (more…)

This French baker cruises around delivering fresh-baked goods to boaters

Here's a guy who's found his niche market.

Out of a humble panga, there is a French baker who goes boat to boat selling his fresh-baked wares to those docked (primarily gringos) in Jalisco, Mexico's Barra de Navidad marina and lagoon area.

Chef Emeric Fiegen opened up shop, with his wife Christine, in this small laidback beach town over 15 years ago after a stint in Montreal. Early each morning, Chef Emeric still personally delivers his many breads, baguettes, croissants, pies, and quiches by boat. Not surprisingly, his pastries sell out by the time he's done making his rounds.

My friends Andrea and Nick are currently on an epic cruising adventure with their teen daughter Pari, and were lucky to sample the breakfast pastries while anchored in Barra de Navidad. Andrea told me that they've never come across a delivery service like this before on any of their many boating trips.

Here's a look at the menu. Keep in mind that those prices are in pesos and that it's currently about 18.50 pesos to the dollar:

Landlubbers, fear not, the French Bakery (aka El Horno Francés) has an onshore eatery for you in town.

photos by Andrea Cook

Get a great deal on Trainz, the world's leading train simulator

Trains may not be the most popular means of conveyance nowadays, but chances are you grew up playing with toy trains or building a model set to wrap around the Christmas tree. In either case, it's safe to say that locomotives have long carried a unique sense of awe and scale, especially when they're hundreds of cars long and roaring across the countryside. Trainz: A New Era lets you experience this feeling again with a 21st-century spin, and its Platinum Edition Bundle is on sale for $19.99 in the Boing Boing Store.

Trainz is a train simulator that brings famous locomotives to life as they travel across historical and modern routes in mind-blowing realism and with a powerful graphics engine. You can create your own routes with in-game editing tools and combine your efforts with other players to build and operate a working rail line. Plus, this edition includes 16 additional routes, three bonus trainsets, and a host of other downloadable content.

The Trainz: A New Era Platinum Edition Bundle is on sale today for $19.99.

Fashion insider offers creative ways to tackle the industry's big pollution problem

These stats are just staggering.

According to Amit Kalra, the fashion industry is the second largest polluter in the world, right behind oil and gas.

He says that in the United States alone, 85% of unsold apparel, a whopping 13 million tons a year, ends up in landfills instead of being donated or recycled.

In his November 2017 TED@Tommy Talk, he offered three creative ways to deal with this issue. Kalra suggests methods for making garments more recyclable and even compostable, and for using spices and herbs to dye fabric instead of the harmful chemical colors that are currently being used.

"There's no fix-all, and there's no one-step solution. But we can get started by designing clothes with their death in mind. The fashion industry is the perfect industry to experiment with and embrace change that can one day get us to the sustainable future we so desperately need."
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