How to make a mallet from milk jugs

Peter Brown made a serviceable mallet from melted down plastic wood jugs.

HDPE is the plastic used in many household containers including gallon sized milk jugs. I melt down about 7 milk jugs and 3 powdered lemonade containers to get enough HDPE to make my mallet head.

The handle of the mallet is made from a cherry board and adds a nice warm contrast to the plastic! This mallet packs a punch and is quite heavy given it smaller size!

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Watch: nature documentaries are phony

Nature documentaries: the sound is fake, the scenes are concocted, some of the animals are computer animations, and the music is emotionally manipulative. But that's the only way we will sit through them, says Simon Cade, host and creator of this explainer video. Read the rest

On the "fakeness" of nature documentaries

Few are scandalized by the BBC adding sound effects to documentary footage, as it's somewhat obvious and the intent is to bring the viewer to a truth that might otherwise be obscured. A lot of other storytelling magic is at hand, though, not all of it so ostentatious. Simon Cade illustrates some of the techniques, among which editing is among the most powerful. Read the rest

Why are so many cartoon characters yellow?

The Simpsons, SpongeBob Squarepants, Minions, Pikachu are yellow. So are many, many other popular cartoon characters. Why? The answer lies at the intersection of psychology, color theory, and, of course, aesthetics. (ChannelFrederator)

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Fantastic Commodore 64 glitch-music-art demo in just 256 bytes

Lunus Sakesson's 256 byte Commodore 64 demo "A Mind Is Born" took first place at the Oldskool 4K Intro compo at the Revision 2017 digital art festival. From his program notes:

The demo is driven by its soundtrack, so in order to understand what the program needs to do, it helps to have a schematic overview of the various parts of the song.

The three voices of the SID chip are used as follows: Voice 1 is responsible for the kick drum and bass, Voice 2 plays the melody and Voice 3 plays a drone that ducks on all beats, mimicking the genre-typical side-chain compression effect.

All in all, the song contains 64 bars in 4/4 time. It is played back at 112.5 bpm by means of a 60 Hz timer interrupt. The interrupt handler is primarily responsible for music playback, while the visuals are mostly generated in main context.

"A Mind Is Born" by Linus Akesson

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Good cop delivers instant justice to driver tailgating a cyclist

If you hate videos depicting karmic road revenge where both parties are at fault, you may enjoy watching this one of a tailgater receiving instant justice. A cyclist realizes he's being menaced by a tailgater only when a Skokie PD cop car pulls in, then pulls them both over. He says "I want you to know that I care" to the cyclist, and busts the driver. Read the rest

DoggoLingo explained

In An Internet Language Built Around Love For The Puppers, Jessica Boddy traces the emergence of dog-flavored memetalk on the Internet.

Some dogs are doggos, some are puppers, and others may even be pupperinos. There are corgos and clouds, fluffers and floofs, woofers and boofers. The chunky ones are thicc, and the thin ones are long bois. When they stick out their tongues, they're doing a mlem, a blep, a blop. They bork. They boof. Once in a while they do each other a frighten. And whether they're 10/10 or 12/10, they're all h*ckin' good boys and girls. Are you picking up what I'm putting down? If not, you're probably not fluent in DoggoLingo, a language trend that's been gaining steam on the Internet in the past few years

It's like the cats thing, but we do the talking instead of them. The key vectors seems to be Dogspotting, the biggest Facebook group for dog lovers, and Dog Rates on Twitter. I wondered a while back if DoggoLingo—and the sudden victory of heartwarming dogs over unpredictable cats in general—has something to do with Trump. As Boddy quotes one professor of Doggo studies: "How can the world be evil when dogs exist?"

Honestly, I could watch Careless Bork all day.

Previously: A guide to doggo names Read the rest

Ernie K. Doe has his heart set on "A Certain Girl"

What her name is, however, he can not tell you. Read the rest

Automotive tires sent down a ski jump

Incredibly satisfying to watch. Read the rest

Some idiot left a coastal wall right in front of a ferry

In Las Palmas de Gran Canaria in the Canary Islands, some total moron designed, financed and constructed a large coastal wall right where a ferry was headed.

Videos and photos of the accident appeared quite serious, although no injuries have been reported.

The ship involved was the Volcan de Tamasite and, according to information received by The Canary, 140 passengers were on board at the time, though nobody seems to have been seriously hurt, some reports have mentioned up to four people with minor injuries.

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Rachel Bloom’s “Lady Boss” is an anxiety-ridden feminist empowerment anthem

In this new collaboration with Vanity Fair, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend creator and star Rachel Bloom delivers an anthem for female power—and female anxiety. Read the rest

Digging into the surprisingly mysterious life of Bob Ross

The YouTube channel Today I Found Out takes a look at the life of famed PBS artist Bob Ross—a beloved public figure whose biography is surprisingly opaque. Read the rest

Watch the Florida Gators mascot save a kid from a foul ball

First Albert Gator saves the kid, then the kid “saves” Albert with CPR. Read the rest

Pupper vs Bananner

Gruesome stuff, don't watch if you're under 18. Read the rest

This is your brain on drug policy - remake of classic PSA with Rachael Lee Cook

In 1998 actor Rachael Lee Cook starred in the "This is your brain on heroin" PSA, smashing up a kitchen with a frying pan: Read the rest

The Journey/Wilson Phillips mashup you've been waiting for

A friend sent me this gem, as vengence for some other Wilson Phillips related post. Read the rest

NYU grad student goes undercover in Chinese iPhone factory and it ain't pretty

NYU grad student Dejian Zeng worked undercover at an iPhone factory in Shanghai, China for six weeks, and "grim" is a nice way to describe it.

Zeng was in charge of one screw per phone, fastening the speaker to the back of the iPhone case. He had to show up at the factory at 7:30 and work 12 hours per day, but was only paid for 10 1/2 hours per day since breaks are unpaid. And his work week consisted of 6 days per week, for which he only gets paid $450/month, including overtime.

The workers live in prison cells, er, I mean dorm rooms that are as bleak as hell. They have only one uniform to wear all week, as well as a pair of slippers. But they do not receive an iPhone as a perk – it's rare to see anyone with a personal iPhone at the iPhone factory. Most workers have a phone that is cheaper.

The thing that shocked Zeng the most was the managers' attitudes - "yelling at the workers is kind of routine in the factories." But the good thing is that the company has installed nets around the stairs to prevent people from committing suicide. Oh, and the windows have cages around them so no one can jump out and kill themselves.

There are more fascinating details in this video. Good undercover work, Zeng! Read the rest

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