Hear David Lynch introducing "Eraserhead" at a screening in 1978

From the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive:

Through the project “Saving Film Exhibition History: Digitizing Recordings of Guest Speakers at the Pacific Film Archive, 1976 to 1986”, BAMPFA is digitizing a decade’s worth of guest-speaker recordings, filmmaker presentations, panel discussions, and Q&A’s from the early years of the Pacific Film Archive, making them available online for the first time.

This episode features David Lynch introducing Eraserhead in March of 1978.

This project is supported by a Recordings at Risk grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources.

The grant program is made possible by funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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A children's book recipe for "No-Bake Spice Cookies," inspired by David Lynch's DUNE

36 years after the release of David Lynch's film adaptation of Dune, that famous flop is still finding new ways to surprise me. Like this Dune Activity Book — not to be confused with the Dune Coloring Book, or the Dune Color and Activity Book, all of which were apparently released in a failed attempt to market the film to kids.

Today, I'm particularly fascinated by this recipe for Dune "No-Bake Spice Cookies."

Was melange supposed to taste like cinnamon and coconut? That doesn't strike me as a very exotic, out-of-this-world spice flavor. Was this supposed to tantalize children like a gateway drug to lead them towards the addictions of hallucinogenic-induced space navigation skills and telepathy? And why should the Kwisatz-Haderach need parental assistance to melt the butter in a saucepan? Children must not fear! Fear is the mindkiller!

Perhaps these cookies are the little death that brings total obliteration. Only one way to find out.

(If you want to get a closer look inside these weird childrens' books, check out this post from Coilhouse)

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David Lynch shows how to make a microphone stand

KCRW Radio station sent a microphone to David Lynch to improve the audio of his wonderful daily weather reports. In this video, he shows a wood stand and a protective box he made for it.

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David Lynch tells the story of a small bug

David Lynch took a break from giving his daily weather report to describe the activity of a caterpillar he observed outside his house.  Eraserhead-like sound effects were added to the short film, which heightened the dread of what followed.

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Something is different about David Lynch's weather report today

As a YouTube commenter said, "David doesn't even need to be in his own video for me to enjoy it." Read the rest

David Lynch's latest 10-minute animated short "FIRE (POZAR)"

David Lynch has finally uploaded FIRE (POZAR), the experimental animated short he did in 2015, to his new David Lynch Theater on YouTube.

To create it, Lynch shared the still drawings he'd done for the piece with composer Marek Zebrowski (who did the music for Lynch's Inland Empire) and didn't share any further details. After Zebrowski had composed the music, animator Noriko Miyakawa put together the final animated short.

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And now over to David Lynch with the weather

This was yesterday, but it'll be now for a long time. This appears to inaugurate a new YouTube channel from David Lynch, master filmmaker and artist. Read the rest

Dale Cooper shows up on TikTok entering Twin Peaks at the exact moment he drove into the town 31 years earlier

From the Welcome to Twin Peaks fan site:

Always eager for fun on social media, Kyle MacLachlan today (Feb 24) decided to launch his brand new TikTok account in the most Twin Peaks way ever. At exactly 11:30 AM (Pacific Time) on Twin Peaks Day, the actor shared a video of him reenacting FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper’s arrival in town at the very same time, only 31 years later with a few more grey hairs. This time, he’s not behind the wheel of his 1981 Dodge Diplomat… but on his exercise bike in front of a hand-painted cardboard backdrop full of Douglas firs. Yes, they’re really something.

@kyle_maclachlan

Diane, it’s 11:30 am, February 24th. Entering the town of #TwinPeaks…and TikTok.Tag me in your duets today and I’ll share some of my favorites 🌲☕️🚗

♬ original sound - kyle_maclachlan

With his first TikTok video, the actor is inviting Twin Peaks fans on the popular short-form video-sharing platform to share their duets using Coop’s famous opening monologue for a chance to get featured. There’s a Laura Palmer wrapped in plastic and a number of fans holding a damn fine cup of coffee, but so far, this duet by @withdropsofjupiter as Audrey Horne in the backseat takes the cake!

@withdropsofjupiter

#duet with kyle_maclachlan Audrey’s a little restless... are we there yet, Agent Cooper? 🌲🌲🌲 #twinpeaks #twinpeaksday #FrostedFeelings #fyp #coop

♬ original sound - kyle_maclachlan

Read the full post here. Read the rest

David Lynch's bizarre new Netflix short is a perfect companion to this quinoa recipe

David Lynch celebrated his 20th birthday by dropping a delightfully bizarre new short film on Netflix called WHAT DID JACK DO? The 17-minute-long murder mystery, which originally premiered at the Fondation Cartier pour l'Art Contemporain in Paris in November 2017, stars Lynch as a grizzled detective interrogating a capuchin monkey named Jack.

It's weird, and wonderful, and totally worth watching. After all, it's only a 17-minute investment.

But the black-and-white footage and incongruous tonality of hard-boiled grit and strange comedic circumstances also reminded me of one of my favorite Lynchian gems: this 20-minute video of Lynch cooking quinoa.

That's it. That's the whole movie. A surreal, moody, atmospheric cooking show for something as simple as quinoa, in a way that only David Lynch could do.

WHAT DID JACK DO? [David Lynch / Netflix]

Thumbnail Image via JVoves/Flickr (CC BY 2.0) Read the rest

David Lynch-directed advertisement for Playstation welcomes you to The Third Place

Once upon a time, people had so much free time that they needed a place to go that wasn't work or home. A third place. Sony was one of the companies competing for that space, and created an entire campaign around the concept. They hired David Lynch to direct a commercial for the Playstation 2 because "He's been living in The Third Place for quite a few years."

The commercial is predictably surreal, makes no detectable reference to video games, and could easily be reused for other products with equal success:

Lynch received some pushback on choosing black and white, but artistic version prevailed over the color version:

There is also a short documentary on the making of the commercial that feels suitably Lynchian--moments of levity amidst a murky, ominous set:

You can see more commercials in the campaign here. Read the rest

David Lynch's Mystery Man's place in the horror pantheon

The "Mystery Man" scene from Lost Highway (embedded above) has become a YouTube classic, a bite-size précis of everything distinctive about the director's unique style and tone, that weird unnerving place between terrifying and cheesy. Here's Sean T. Collins on "David Lynch's scariest scene"

Our hero’s an avant-jazz saxophonist; it’s possible this isn’t the oddest person he’s met this week. Nevermind that he’s had nightmares about his wife Renee, whom he can no longer satisfy sexually, in which she had this man’s face. Nevermind that this guy is saying they met at Fred and Renee’s austere house, where an unknown intruder has been breaking in to film them as they sleep and then dropping off the videotapes at their front door. Nevermind that all the music and party chatter has faded out and all we hear beneath the dialogue is the proverbial ominous whoosh. We may know we’re watching something frightening, but Fred doesn’t, not yet.

“As a matter of fact,” the Mystery Man says regarding the house, “I’m there right now.”

Blake's perverse intensity gets instantly under your skin even if you think it's silly, which it is. In the real world, dangerous people are often ridiculous and I wonder if this is why David Lynch let Robert Blake design the character and do his own makeup.

See also Collins' article about monumental horror images. Read the rest

Curtains Up, a short film on movies and meditation featuring David Lynch

Stella McCartney profiles David Lynch in this moody piece on the joys of cinema and transcendental meditation. Read the rest

David Lynch's Rabbits has come to rob you of all the comfort in your life

If you're into non-sequiturs, existential angst or having a creeping hand of dread gently caress you in all your secret places, you'll adore David Lynch's Rabbits.

Filmed in 2002, Rabbits is a brooding work of art that only Lynch could call a sitcom with a straight face. Over the course of 45 minutes, Lynch, through the use of disjointed dialogue presented by three humanoid rabbits, oppressive lighting, a laugh track, demonic visitations and a haunting musical score by Angelo Badalamenti, manages to outdo all of the nightmares that I've ever been a part of... with the possible exception of those three days I spent in Burgos hopped up on painkillers, orange Fanta and gin.

I don't think I'm quite ready to talk about that one, yet. Read the rest

And now, 35 minutes of commercials directed by David Lynch

It's the only mainlined injection of capitalism worth your time this week. Read the rest

David Lynch has a cool line of 'Meditating Eye' jewelry

Expandable Necklace

Director David Lynch is an avid meditator. His twice daily Transcendental Meditation (TM) practice spans over 40 years. In fact, he's such a fan of TM that he started a foundation in 2005 to "ensure that every child anywhere in the world who wanted to learn to meditate could do so."

He writes:

It has given me effortless access to unlimited reserves of energy, creativity and happiness deep within. This level of life is sometimes called “pure consciousness”—it is a treasury. And this level of life is deep within us all.

But I had no idea how powerful and profound this technique could be until I saw firsthand how it was being practiced by young children in inner-city schools, veterans who suffer the living hell of post-traumatic stress disorder and women and girls who are victims of terrible violence.

The David Lynch Foundation now serves both children and adults around the world, teaching them the healing power of meditation. Through the end of the year, 20% of the proceeds from his line of "Meditating Eye" jewelry goes to the foundation to help them with their mission.

The entire gold and silver tone collection is available at online retailer ALEX AND ANI.

Charm bangle

Men's cuff

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Sorry, David Lynch's Dune sucks (or does it?)

David Lynch's 1982 Dune wasn't well-received at the time, but over the years has become a cult classic—perhaps even a good film. With a few nods to the lavish sets and striking set-pieces, Emily Asher-Perrin takes a weirding module to the latter claim: David Lynch’s Dune is What You Get When You Build a Science Fictional World With No Interest in Science Fiction.

Any attempt at cohesion on a more granular level, which is where worldbuilding is most essential in science fiction, is shrugged off in favor of another inexplicable style choice that brings a bit of form and zero function. With the exceptions of military collars and crests, there is nothing that communicates how these things and people connect—some have tried to christen it “noir-baroque” which is a cute thought, but it’s hard to believe that any detailed reasons for the aesthetics were considered beyond “this looks cool.”

Dune wants to be phantasmagorical and it wants to be offensive to your senses, and those things can work in cinema, as Lynch’s career communicates incredibly well. But this film does not carry off that off-kilter creepiness as anything more than a parlor trick. It fails to be authentic because these cues are not entrenched in the universe projected on screen. They are there to shock the viewer, to disgust them, but they don’t mean anything. The Guild member floating in its chamber of gas is strange and otherworldly and grotesque, but communicates nothing besides that. It is not integrated into its setting, its surroundings.

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Twin Peaks tarot cards

Last year, Benjamin Mackey designed an inspired collection of digital Twin Peaks Tarot cards. Now, Mackey is making the deck real through an Indiegogo campaign! From the project description:

The Magician Longs to See Tarot is a complete 78-card deck with 22 Major Arcana and 56 Minor Arcana in full color. The deck combines the mystical world of Twin Peaks with visual evocations of Pamela Colman Smith's iconic tarot illustrations. The Major Arcana have manifested as some of the primary movers and shakers in Twin Peaks, while the Minor Arcana tend towards depicting infamous scenes and moments in the series. My goal is to strike a delicate balance between accurately representing the respective characters while still maintaining readability as a deck.

"The Magician Longs to See Tarot" (via Daily Grail)

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