Should the Vulcan greeting replace the handshake in the coronavirus era?

In this CNet piece, Gael Fashingbauer Cooper poses the question: should the "Live Long and Prosper" Vulcan greeting replace handshakes in the coronavirus era?

Hell, yes! Let's do this thing.

I've also seen the suggestion that we do the Hindu "Namaste" greeting. I like the Vulcan salute much better.

One of the things you may not know about the Vulcan greeting is that Leonard Nimoy himself came up with it, based on a secret benediction he had witnessed in Temple as a child. He was not supposed to look. He looked and saw the Rabbis giving the congregation this salute. He later found out that it represents the Hebrew letter, Shin, and that it is an invocation of the Shekhinah, the female aspect of God.

When it came time on the set of Star Trek to dream up some Vulcan greeting the first time Spock returns to his home planet, this V gesture was the first thing Nimoy thought of. Here he is telling the story of these origins.

It is amazing to realize that, all of these decades, we have been invoking the female aspect of God whenever we flash the Vulcan greeting. I don't know about you, but I think we could use more of such blessings right about now.

May you wash your hands (20 seconds, people!), not touch your face, and may you Live Long and Prosper. Image: YouTube Read the rest

Star Wars-themed furniture to furnish your Tardis with

Na-nu, na-nu fellow trekkies! The Kenneth Cobonpue Star Wars Collection features Dark Side-themed chairs and end-tables, a wookie "rocking stool" (hot tip: ask for a sample before you get the whole stool!), and the standout, a powder-coated metal light-saber-battle lamp in two sizes. Read the rest

At first I thought this Ka-Bar Tactical Spork was an artisanal Spork

My friend sent me a photo of his uber tuff tactical Spork.

Perhaps it is the burlap couch upholstery, but my aged eyes missed the KABAR and thought this was a handcrafted Spork that some Seattle-area artist must have designed just for my pal. Because who doesn't want a super cool Spork?

I was told to wait for it. Then I was sent this photo and it became clear the Spork was made by famed US Military hardware enthusiast fan-favorite Ka-Bar, and not some artisanal Spork maker.

I am sort of disappointed the fleetingly imagined trend where Game of Thrones enthusaists are all eating with their own custom version of a Casterly Rock Spork, just like Tywin used, died so quickly. I am ordering a KaBar Spork for my camper van.

Ka-Bar Tactical Spork via Amazon Read the rest

Women are the backbone of the Star Trek fandom

Star Trek celebrated its 50th anniversary last week and one of the sci-fi series' biggest legacies is shaping our modern concept of “fandom." The original 1960s series inspired everything from conventions to fan magazines to fanfiction. And as Victoria McNally writes for Revelist, “Unlike the classic male nerd archetype that most people tend to picture in their heads, the quintessential Star Trek fan is a woman.” Read the rest