Animator PES crafts a taco with his flea market haul

Most of PES' videos showcase his amazingly stylish stop-motion animation skills. While his most recent upload is a departure from that, it's equally as compelling. In the video, he heads to his local flea market in Long Beach, California and shows us not only what kinds of things he fancies but also shares, in some cases, why they grabbed his attention.

We also get to see how he combines seemingly-unrelated elements to make something creative and new, which is what he does in his animated shorts (like Submarine Sandwich, Western Spaghetti and the Oscar-nominated Fresh Guacamole).

Now watch as he turns a vintage baseball glove into a crispy taco shell stuffed with crystallized "meat," shredded money "lettuce," dice(d) "tomatoes," and golf pencil "cheese."

Rancher takes feds to court over camera they placed on his property without permission

Ricardo Palacios, a 74-year old rancher, had gotten used to Customs and Border Protection officials tromping across his south Texas ranch lands without permission over the years. But finding a wireless surveillance camera set up in one of his trees? Not OK. Upon discovering the device, Palacios removed it immediately. It wasn't long after that he started receiving calls from CBP and the Texas Rangers demanding that he turn the camera over to them or face charges.

Having taken enough of their shit, instead of turning the camera over, Palacios gave the feds something else instead: a lawsuit.

According to Ars Technica, Palacios, who's been a lawyer for 50 years,  named the two agencies and a CBP agent in a lawsuit that accuses them of violating his constitutional rights, by trespassing on his land, and setting up cameras where ever they damn well please. It's an important case: CBP claims it has a right, within a 100-mile radius of the American border, to stop people (including U.S. citizens, which flies in the face of the Fourth Amendment,) search cars and personal belongings in the name of border security, without a warrant. But this doesn't allow them to go traipsing on to private property in the name of their duties without permission. They're only allowed to  do that within 25 miles of the border.

Palacios' ranch? It's 35 miles away from the edge of the U.S./Mexican border. This alone would be enough to warrant a suit against the government. But there's more:

As Palacios alleges in the civil complaint, his interactions with CBP began in April 2010 when his two sons were stopped at a checkpoint along I-35. When one son, Ricardo Palacios Jr., refused to answer questions, he was taken to a secondary inspection where he was assaulted by a CBP officer. Eventually, after being detained for 90 minutes, he was driven home to the ranch just a few miles away.

Over the next several years, CBP agents roamed "freely about, day or night" on the Palacios ranch, despite his numerous efforts to protest. He even sent a formal letter to a regional CBP supervisor on April 9, 2010. However, the letter doesn't seem to have made any substantive difference.

Palacios' suit has yet to be heard by a judge, but the ask is very simple: he wants state and federal agents to stop creeping on to his property without permission or probable cause. Were the courts to side with the rancher, it could have far reaching ramifications for how border agents go about their duties.

Image via Pixabay

Here's the Harlem Globetrotters' Rube Goldberg 'trick shot' machine

Yep, the Harlem Globetrotters are still doing their thing and as evidenced by their YouTube channel (don't miss their "one take" video from last year), these basketball-spinning darlings are doing it better than ever.

These courtside jesters recently teamed up students from Georgia Tech's colleges of Industrial Design and Music to make this Rube Goldberg 'trick shot' machine. Watch as their starred, red, white, and blue basketball makes its way through a complicated path from a Globetrotter to an impressive hole-in-one.

It's a fun watch (despite all those editing cuts).

(Sploid)

Share your big emotional moment on this crowdsourced map of NYC

Ever had something life changing happen to you in the Big Apple? Here's your chance to mark that emotional occasion on a crowdsourced map of the city.

To contribute to Kate Ray's "Crying in Public" map, you'll need to first sign up (no signup required to gawk at other people's hot messes). Then, pick an appropriate emoji that matches your life moment (a peach for "NSFW," crying face for "cried in public," swirly lollipop for "peaked at an altered state", etc.) and place it on the map along with its abbreviated story.

P.S. Don't go to the Chipotle at 6th Avenue and W. 13th.

(Waxy)

This vintage-looking speaker produces cutting-edge sound

Many of us enjoy the aesthetic of vintage electronics, but trying to use most hardware from the 1950's isn't necessarily practical. This is especially true where speakers are concerned. While most of us can appreciate the old-school feel of retro speakers, they have a hard time matching the convenience and power delivered by today's Bluetooth speakers. The Lofree Poison bridges this gap by offering a cutting-edge speaker wrapped up in a nostalgic design, and it's on sale for $79.99 in the Boing Boing Store.

Packaged in a retro, 1950's frame, this Kickstarter success boasts an enhanced bass driver and ultra large diaphragm, allowing it to pump out powerful and full-bodied bass without sacrificing mids and trebles. It utilizes 20-watt amplifiers to boost its sound potential, and it's rated to last up to six hours at a time thanks to its 2000mAh rechargeable battery. 

Normally retailing for $119, the Lofree Poison is on sale for $79.99 in the Boing Boing Store.

Prince Charles’ love child, Jack Ruby’s faked murder, and Jennifer Aniston’s shattered world, in this week’s tabloids

If you think that Tinkerbell won’t die if you believe hard enough in fairies, then you’ll have no problem believing this week’s tabloid stories, which rely heavily on wishful thinking.

Princess-to-be Meghan Markle and disgraced NBC morning anchor Matt Lauer’s “dressing room hook-up” dominates the ‘National Enquirer’ cover, which reports that their “sleazy” rendezvous has left the “Royal wedding thrown into chaos!” An unnamed NBC source claims that Markle and Lauer disappeared into his dressing room and closed the door when she appeared on the ’Today’ show - twice! And what debauchery went on inside? The ‘Enquirer’ has no idea, admitting: “it went on behind closed doors.” But reporters can dream, can’t they? Sleazy, indeed. (more…)

Before standing for the Democratic nomination in a NY congressional race, Patrick Ryan was in business spying on union organizers and left-wing activists

Patrick Ryan wants to be the Democratic nominee for New York's 19th district in the Hudson Valley, a Republican seat that Dems hope to flip; he's gone on record stating that he can do the job because of his entrepreneurial success -- but he didn't mention that he built his career at Berico Technologies by pitching a product to help businesses spy on union organizers and left-wing activists, a plan that included spying on left-wing Democrats and planting fake documents in order to discredit labor unions. (more…)

Fully Automated Small Screen Luxury Communism: Amazon is making a TV show out of Iain Banks's Culture novels

The late, lamented Scottish writer Iain Banks (previously) was several kinds of writer, but one of his main claims to fame is his role in developing the idea of fully automated luxury communism, in his beloved Culture novels, a series of wildly original space operas about a post-singularity, post-scarcity cooperative galactic civilization devoted to games, leisure, and artistic pursuits, populated by AIs, city-sized space cruisers, spy networks, and weird bureaucracies. (more…)

Astronauts share their experiences seeing Earth from space

What's it really like to gaze at Earth from space? Does an offworld view of the Pale Blue Dot shift your perspective forever? For the cover story in the new issue of National Geographic, talented science writer Nadia Drake talks to astronauts about how the rarified experience of seeing our planet from space changed them forever. “You’ve got this planet beneath you, and a lot of what you see, especially during the day, does not necessarily point to a human presence," Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti told Drake. "If you look at it on a geologic timescale, it’s almost like we are this flimsy presence, and we really have to stick together as a human family to make sure we are a permanent presence on this planet and not just this blink of an eye.”

It's a beautiful and moving story. Nadia writes:

For the bulk of human history, it’s been impossible to put Earth in cosmic perspective.

Bound by gravity and biology, we can’t easily step outside it, above it, or away from it. For most of us, Earth is inescapably larger than life. Even now, after nearly six decades of human spaceflight, precious few people have rocketed into orbit and seen the sun peeking out from behind that curved horizon. Since 1961, a mere 556 people have had this rarefied experience. Fewer, just 24, have watched Earth shrink in the distance, growing smaller and smaller until it was no larger than the face of a wristwatch. And only six have been completely alone behind the far side of the moon, cut off from a view of our planet as they sailed in an endlessly deep, star-studded sea...

It’s an inherently unnatural thing, spaceflight. After all, our physiology evolved specifically to succeed on this planet, not above it. Perhaps that’s why it can be difficult for astronauts to describe the experience of seeing Earth from space.

"They Saw Earth From Space. Here's How It Changed Them." (National Geographic)

Some free short stories from Soviet-era science fiction author Anatoly Dneprov

This week I found several stories by Anatoly Dneprov, shared free on the series of tubes we call the internet.

Anatoly Dneprov, a science teacher, wrote wonderful, fast-paced, and oh-so very representative of Russia science fiction in the 1950s and 1960s. Not only does Dneprov masterfully communicate the headspace of living in a dystopic society, but his ideas about self-replicating machines, 3D printing and number of other things-to-come are eerie to the point of disbelief.

The Purple Mummy is a fantastic story about first contact coming from someplace completely unexpected. In just a few pages, as these stories are short, Dneprov launches quite a few huge ideas, and brings the story to a conclusion that doesn't feel lacking. Advances in medicine, the birth of 3D printing, and some very Russian existentialism over an anti-Universe are all strung together in a way that makes more sense than it should.

I also enjoyed his short The Maxwell Equations.

Links are via the Internet Archive and offer all the e-versions you might want.

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